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Old 02-05-2014, 12:45 PM   #1
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14-2 wire


I used 14-2 wiring in my kitchen which I was told by the dept. Store That I went to purchase the wire from. After reading some questions and answers, I noticed that for outlets I should have gotten 12-2 wire if so do I have to rewire for all of my outlets.? And if not what can I do ? ( I have 3 outlets ran by itself ) and no more than 2 outlets on 1 breaker . I did that not wanting to overload at all .... And last what amp breaker should I use

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Old 02-05-2014, 12:56 PM   #2
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Going to have to go back and add your location to your profile when asking code questions. Just go to quick links to edit.
In the US you needed 12-2, 20 amp. breaker, GFI protection for outlets over the counter top, at least two circuits over the counter tops. Ref. can be on it's own circuit.
There's also a spacing code, I'm sure one of the electricians will be along.

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Old 02-05-2014, 01:00 PM   #3
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You must use a 15 amp breaker.
If there will be no inspection, it should be fine. I have no issues in my kitchen that is all on 15 amp breakers.

Now, before everyone banishes me, this is my opinion only on this situation.
The OP should probably not have attempted this project at all if he had to ask the aprons which size wire he needs or which size breaker to use. If he will continue, I would like to see the correct breaker is installed for that size wire.

I personally would rather see things done to code as renovations are taking place.
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Old 02-05-2014, 01:00 PM   #4
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Any circuits invloving 14-gauge wire should be protected by a 15-amp breaker; NOT a 20-amp breaker - that's very important! If the circuit in question is currently protected by a 20-amp breaker, then all wiring in that circuit should be (a minimum of) 12-gauge.

If the circuit is indeed on a 20-amp breaker now, and 14-guage wire cannot be replaced with 12-gauge, or if you cannot confirm for certain that all of the circuit's wiring is otherwise 12-guage, then the safest course of action (without having to tear out & replace wiring, that is) is simply to replace the 20-amp breaker with a 15-amp breaker.

If the circuit is currently protected with a 15-amp breaker, then you are fine using 14-guage (or 12-guage) wire anywhere in the circuit. In that case, just make sure that any outlets installed on the circuit are 15-amp (not 20-amp) outlets. The easy way to tell the difference visually is that a 20-amp outlet has a sideways "T" for the left-hand prong slot. If you do have any 20-amp outlets on a circuit currently protected by a 15-amp breaker, simply swap those outlets for a 15-amp version - no new wiring necessary.

ETA: As others have said, the kitchen outlets should be GFCI. GFCI protection can be accomplished by using either a GFCI breaker at the panel, or using GFCI outlet receptacles - the outlet option is typically cheaper.

Cheers, Chris

Last edited by Chris130; 02-05-2014 at 01:05 PM.
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Old 02-05-2014, 01:07 PM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by criplove View Post
I used 14-2 wiring in my kitchen which I was told by the dept. Store That I went to purchase the wire from. After reading some questions and answers, I noticed that for outlets I should have gotten 12-2 wire if so do I have to rewire for all of my outlets.? And if not what can I do ? ( I have 3 outlets ran by itself ) and no more than 2 outlets on 1 breaker . I did that not wanting to overload at all .... And last what amp breaker should I use
Do the right thing. Re-do it with #12 on a 20A breaker.
I don't care if it's being inspected or not, do it right.
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Old 02-05-2014, 01:19 PM   #6
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Code requires 2 or more 20 amp circuits for the Small Appliance Branch circuits in a kitchen. This requires 12 AWG wire on a 20amp breaker.

Additionally, countertop receptacles, one for every 12" width of countertop space, requires GFCI protection.

Don't rely on the Hardwareman for instructions anymore.
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Old 02-05-2014, 01:36 PM   #7
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Even without an inspection, using a microwave and one other device could easily trip a 15A breaker. Could be quite annoying! I agree with Speedy Petey.
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Old 02-05-2014, 01:37 PM   #8
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Thanks
The walls are still open so I can add the 12-2 wire but I just didn't want to buy all new wire over again .... So adding 2 or 3 lines with 12-2 wires should be good are do all outlets have to be ran with 12-2 by code ?
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Old 02-05-2014, 02:23 PM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by criplove View Post
Thanks
The walls are still open so I can add the 12-2 wire but I just didn't want to buy all new wire over again .... So adding 2 or 3 lines with 12-2 wires should be good are do all outlets have to be ran with 12-2 by code ?
Yes. I would just do the lighting with 12/2. Pick up some 12/3, so that you can run MWBC (Multi-wire branch circuit), vs a bunch of single branch circuits. It will save space in your panel.

For lighting say the light over the sink, it would be a Switch-Loop, so you will need 12/3, so that you have a Neutral at the box where the switch is.

You can still use the 14/2 for the fridge, disposal, dish-washer, but it is just easier to use all 12/2 & 12/3, or just use 12/3 period, instead of going with two different types.

You would just fold back that unused wire in the box, and leave the wire unstripped, if not using the extra wire.
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Old 02-05-2014, 03:53 PM   #10
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Originally Posted by sirsparksalot View Post
Additionally, countertop receptacles, one for every 12" width of countertop space, requires GFCI protection.
The spacing requirement is such that no space is more than 2' from a receptacle, not every foot. Any countertop over 12" needs a receptacle. There are more details also. Google Mike Holt kitchen receptacle spacing for a nice graphic.
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Old 02-05-2014, 03:55 PM   #11
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Quote:
Originally Posted by criplove View Post
Thanks
The walls are still open so I can add the 12-2 wire but I just didn't want to buy all new wire over again .... So adding 2 or 3 lines with 12-2 wires should be good are do all outlets have to be ran with 12-2 by code ?

With the possible exception of a dedicated fridge outlet all kitchen outlets should be on a 20 amp circuit using 12/2 wg wire.

Convenience outlets in other room are often on 15 amp 14/2 wg.
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Old 02-05-2014, 04:46 PM   #12
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With the possible exception of a dedicated fridge outlet all kitchen outlets should be on a 20 amp circuit using 12/2 wg wire.

Convenience outlets in other room are often on 15 amp 14/2 wg.
All newer homes in our area are being built with 20 amp circuits for all outlets. Lighting you may find 15 amp circuits. The wiring though you will find nothing but 12/2 or 12/3 for lighting & outlets. Cheaper to use one type of wire for branch circuits, regardless if 15 or 20, then pulling #12 & 14.
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Old 02-05-2014, 04:53 PM   #13
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Cheaper to use one type of wire for branch circuits, regardless if 15 or 20, then pulling #12 & 14.
That is not the reason. How would it be cheaper to use a more expensive product? It might be easier to stock only one type of wire, but not cheaper.

The reason is because of AFCI's. You could install 2 20A AFCI breakers instead of 3 15A AFCI's.
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Old 02-05-2014, 05:28 PM   #14
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This may not apply to your kitchen but worth mentioning,if you have a permanent installed microwave(like many above stove) it should be on its own dedicated circuit 20 amp circuit.
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Old 02-05-2014, 07:57 PM   #15
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ok the end result...install 12 wire with 20 amp breaker....inspected or not... only one way ....the right way.....ben sr

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