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Old 09-29-2012, 12:59 PM   #16
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is 14/2 ok for fridge ?


Newer refrigerators are now using less energy than the older appliances. I doubt that whoever wrote about the 20 amp plugs at the big box appliance section has ever taken a look or found a 20 amp cord cap.

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Old 09-29-2012, 01:03 PM   #17
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is 14/2 ok for fridge ?


Who cares if it has place for 500 pizza the cord end is still a normal 15A plug so 20A is a waste.

I have never seen a home appliance with a 20A cord end on it, I have only seen a few in the commercial work i do on a daily basis.
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Old 09-29-2012, 08:24 PM   #18
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I've seen, found, and used 20 amp cord caps. I've purchased them at big boxes and electrical supply houses, even Habitat for Humanity Restores, . I've seen them on new domestic microwaves and reefers. I've even seen electricians install 20A outlets on walls in kitchens I've remodeled. There is no need for you to get up on your high horse.

Yes, newer appliances appliances use less energy than older ones. A small "dorm sized" one only draws 4 amps, I should be able to run that one on bell wire and an in line fuse.

A quick Google will find lots of microwaves that require a 20 amp circuit, mostly built ins that are hardwired. Many more recommend it. A quick Google will find many reefers that recommend, if not require a 20A circuit. A quick ramble thru this or other DIY forums , DIY and electrical advice sites, many hosted by licensed electricians such as yourself , also shows lots of 20A recommendations.



Here's a guy, Degree in Electrical Construction & Maintenance (Dean's List), Master electrician,OSHA Safety Certified (10 & 30) runs two electrical companies “...with a short run of 12/2 ...Connecting the microwave this way....(to a new receptacle mounted to an old work box) - it will be tied into a 120 volt 20 amp circuit....and be properly protected.”
http://en.allexperts.com/q/Electrical-Wiring-Home-1734/Undercabinet-Oven-Microwave-wiring.htm


These guys say 12 on 20 is required, I never said that, http://electrical.about.com/od/wirin...ngcircuits.htm


Here's from my reefer manual, “A 115 volt, 60 Hz., AC only, 15- or 20-amp fused, grounded
electrical supply is required.”
https://www.whirlpool.com/digitalassets/MLPDF/User%20Instructions%20-%20W10407369.pdf
page 6


A microwave manual “A 120 volt, 60 Hz, AC only, 15- or 20-amp electrical supply
with a fuse or circuit breaker”
http://www.whirlpool.com/digitalassets/GH7208XRS/Installation%20Instruction_EN.pdf
page 3


I have never seen a home appliance with a 20A cord end on it” As I said, I have. I can't say what you see in commercial applications but 20A is not rare on commercial stand alone reefers and freezers here and take a look at 1200 watt and larger commercial micro waves.


A waste? 3 or 4 cent difference in price per foot between 14/2 and 12/2 NM-B. If you read my posts, you'd see that I agree that 15A is fine and no problem. You'll also see why I think 20A is better.


I can still build a house with 2x4 studs and meet code most places, but 2x6 despite the few dollars more is better. For one thing, and this is not me saying this but a structural engineer, “... when the electrician and plumber get through drilling their holes, at least some of the stud is left with the 2X6 stud."

http://www.eng-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=316468
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Old 09-29-2012, 08:45 PM   #19
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is 14/2 ok for fridge ?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jim Port View Post
Newer refrigerators are now using less energy than the older appliances. I doubt that whoever wrote about the 20 amp plugs at the big box appliance section has ever taken a look or found a 20 amp cord cap.
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Originally Posted by darren View Post
Who cares if it has place for 500 pizza the cord end is still a normal 15A plug so 20A is a waste.

I have never seen a home appliance with a 20A cord end on it, I have only seen a few in the commercial work i do on a daily basis.
Yeah you guys. Get down off your high horses!
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Old 09-29-2012, 08:59 PM   #20
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Yeah you guys. Get down off your high horses!
Sorry I saw Jim up there and wanted to go up as well.
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Old 09-29-2012, 09:22 PM   #21
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You are right Petey, I was getting a nose bleed up there.
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Old 09-29-2012, 10:25 PM   #22
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is 14/2 ok for fridge ?


Glad you're amused, if you've seen my posts you know i like to bring a bit of lightheartedness to the subject, as well as advice based on knowledge I've gained over last 50 years or so. I'll also throw in some opinions and disagree with other opinions. I've never talked down to anyone or called anyone a liar, which is what jim came very close to doing.
I have no beef with darren, merely a disagreement over whether up grading to 20 amp is a waste or improvement. He might convince me, but we'll probably never agree on that.
I'm sure Mr Port is very knowledgeable and proficient at his trade. If he wants to argue with manufacturers, other electricians, or even poor ignorant me, stumbling around the huge scary big box, not even knowing what I am looking for, he probably has points worth listening to. But ad hominem arguments rarely convince any one of anything.
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Old 09-30-2012, 01:55 AM   #23
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is 14/2 ok for fridge ?


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All the receptacles in a kitchen must be on 20 amp circuits except the refrigerator which can be on a 15 amp circuit with no other loads.
No, not all receptacles in a kitchen, regardless of the 15A or greater fridge circuit, are required to be on a 20A circuit-only SABCs.

Dishwasher, disposer, compactor, range hood, etc could also be on 15A circuits.
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Old 09-30-2012, 04:16 AM   #24
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No, not all receptacles in a kitchen, regardless of the 15A or greater fridge circuit, are required to be on a 20A circuit-only SABCs.

Dishwasher, disposer, compactor, range hood, etc could also be on 15A circuits.
Usually, the dishwasher, disposal, etc. are hard wired, aren't they?
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Old 09-30-2012, 04:40 AM   #25
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Usually, the dishwasher, disposal, etc. are hard wired, aren't they?
dishwasher - commonly hardwired but can be plug and corded to meet the requirement for a disconnect.

Disposer - more often plug and cord but can be hardwired.
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Old 09-30-2012, 06:51 AM   #26
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I am not trying to insinuate that anyone is lying. I do however have a healthy doubt of much that is written and does not seem to have much basis like the part about the big box information. Even the built-in Sub Zero in one kitchen I worked on had a 15 amp cord end.

I would consider the 20 amp circuit an improvement if the homeowner was getting a benefit from it. I looked at my refrigerator and it shows less than 7 amps. This is less than half of even the 15 amp circuit so not even the smaller circuit is close to being maxed out.
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Old 09-30-2012, 03:06 PM   #27
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Jim, I owe you an apology, here it is. I misread your post and jumped to conclusion, not 1st time for me. "...whoever wrote about the 20 amp plugs at the big box appliance section..." I see now you were addressing big box writer not me. If you wanta remount, I'll even give you a leg up. ( This is 2nd time I'm typing this, 'puter crashed just as i hit "Post" and who knows where, 1st attempt wound up. So you know i mean apology.)

None the less, more and more opinions and advice, some from more "authoritative" sites than these anonymous forums, is for 20A dedicated circuits for large appliances, especially hardwired ones and many manufacturers of combo range hood/ microwaves require it.

20A is overkill, but if price and other things are considered it may be "better," just as over building a wall may be. A "better" than 15A on 14 would be 15/12. No need to re-plug appliance or replace outlets. I've been using NM 12-3 for my new or re-wiring 'cause I get a great deal on partial rolls at Hab for Humanity Restore, less than 14 at big box.

Code05, ya got me confused, another common state for me. "...not all receptacles in a kitchen... are required to be on a 20A circuit-only SABCs." So SA's need to be on 20A? But larger ones can be on 15? Or am I misreading something again? Misinterpreting what is meant by SABC? When does appliance stop being small and become power hungry behemoth ?

In re-reading to see where thread got off track from Fixin's original query, I saw this,"i have enough 14/3... i will run the fridge off 1 wire, then the rest of the "whatever" off the other wire." I'm assuming he won't run both hots off same breaker, but wouldn't that require a separate or at least larger neutral?

Fixin, " owners emanual.... doesn't even say the power consumption" There may be a seperate installation manual, go to manufacturer's site and see if they have online manuals. There also may be a spec section for your model. ( Bet it says to connect to 15 or 20 amp circuit.)

OK were it goes, gonna push button. Wish me luck, good or bad, depending if you are on Percheron or Shetland pony.
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Old 09-30-2012, 09:45 PM   #28
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No problem.
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Old 10-01-2012, 08:14 AM   #29
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is 14/2 ok for fridge ?


this is the fridge i have. i still don't see where it states power consumption.
http://www.lg.com/us/refrigerators/l...r-refrigerator

but at any rate, with the newer models being more energy efficient, i believe i am ok with what i did. as the new wire is better quality. and the old wire has been running at higher volumes for decades.
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Old 10-01-2012, 09:23 AM   #30
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this is the fridge i have. i still don't see where it states power consumption.
http://www.lg.com/us/refrigerators/l...r-refrigerator

but at any rate, with the newer models being more energy efficient, i believe i am ok with what i did. as the new wire is better quality. and the old wire has been running at higher volumes for decades.
Fix'n's right. I followed every link I could on the LG site, and nothing about current consumption. Owner's manual, spec sheet, tech specifications page... the closest it came was saying 115VAC @ 60Hz, which wasn't exactly a surprise.

About the only place I could think to look would be on the back panel of the fridge itself for some kind of builder's plate.

By the way, fix'n, how did you fit the fork lift into your kitchen to position that monster?

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