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Old 08-23-2009, 02:03 PM   #1
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120 amp sub panel


I am running conduit and wire a total of 260 feet from the main fusebox to a subpanel. I was thinking of 2 60 amp fuses at the main fuse box but what would the best wire selection be for this type of instalation. once at the subpanel I will split it into 2 circuits with 6 stadium lights apiece running a little over 9 amps apiece. Any advice is appreciated.

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Old 08-23-2009, 02:50 PM   #2
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120 amp sub panel


What is your voltage? Watts per fixture(total watts?)?

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Old 08-23-2009, 03:42 PM   #3
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120 amp sub panel


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Originally Posted by Handyman93277 View Post
I am running conduit and wire a total of 260 feet from the main fusebox to a subpanel. I was thinking of 2 60 amp fuses at the main fuse box but what would the best wire selection be for this type of instalation. once at the subpanel I will split it into 2 circuits with 6 stadium lights apiece running a little over 9 amps apiece. Any advice is appreciated.
What do you mean by 120v sub-panel? You mean 120/240v, right?

I'd run three #2cu for the hots and neutral with a #6 ground, and use a 70 amp breaker/fuses.

Are you aware of the other codes involved and grounding electrode requirements?
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Old 08-23-2009, 04:21 PM   #4
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120 amp sub panel


I think we need to know what you are doing
Do you have a fuse box or breakers?

Title of thread is 120a sub panel
I've never heard of using (2) 60a fuses to power a 120a sub

(2) circuits with 6 stadium lights each

Each circuit uses 9a (don't think so)?
Or sounds like each lamp uses 9a ?? = ~1000w lights?
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Old 08-23-2009, 04:22 PM   #5
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120 amp sub panel


the lights are 1000 watt 110v apiece
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Old 08-23-2009, 05:13 PM   #6
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120 amp sub panel


Quote:
Originally Posted by Handyman93277 View Post
I am running conduit and wire a total of 260 feet from the main fusebox to a subpanel. I was thinking of 2 60 amp fuses at the main fuse box but what would the best wire selection be for this type of instalation. once at the subpanel I will split it into 2 circuits with 6 stadium lights apiece running a little over 9 amps apiece. Any advice is appreciated.
There's a misconception that a lot of lay people (as distinguished from experienced DIYers) have. That if there's a 60amp., 220v. Service or subpanel they will multiply the total capacity. As is obvious fr. poster #1! Where the caption reads "120 Amp. panel" and the details speak about utilizing Two 60Amp. circuits! The size of the Service can only be rated by the ampacity of the feeders @ 220v. Meaning, that if there are two ungrounded #2 wires, there's a capacity for 100 Amps. only! Even though we're utilizing both @ 120v. to ground! Eliminate confusion through Education! (Now more than ever)!!!
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Old 08-23-2009, 07:34 PM   #7
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120 amp sub panel


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the lights are 1000 watt 110v apiece
WOW! 1000w fixtures at 120v? Are they multi-tap? Can you wire them for 240v? Your circuits can either be smaller that way or you will need fewer circuits to run the same number of lights.
Plus, the load will be almost perfectly balanced that way.

Either way, running them at 240v is the way to go.
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Old 08-23-2009, 07:52 PM   #8
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120 amp sub panel


First of all, you should be aware that branch circuits larger than 50 Amps shall only supply non lighting loads. [NEC 210.23(D)]

So you are not permitted to install a 60 Amp lighting circuit.

It would appear from your additional information that you want to install (12) 1000 watt fixtures. That is a total of 12,000 watts @ 120 Volts. This amounts to a 100 Amp continuous load. If you used a 240 Volt feeder, and balanced the fixtures over both legs of the feeder, this amounts to a 50 Amp load.

But if you used a 50 Amp circuit, you would be operating at 100% of the load, and this would not work, as you are required to load your branch circuits to no more than 80% continuous capacity. Even a 60 Amp circuit if it were allowed would not meet that requirement.

At the sub-panel, I would utilize (3) multi-wire double-pole 30 Amp circuits, installing no more than (2) lights per leg on each circuit. Or (6) single pole 30 Amp breakers, feeding no more than (2) lights per circuit. They could be served by (12) individual 15 Amp circuits, if desired.

I concur with Speedy on using (3) #2 copper wires, with a #6 ground to such a sub-panel. A 1Ĺ" conduit would be sufficient for this installation.

You would also have to install a ground rod at the sub-panel location if it is mounted on a separate structure or pole.
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Old 08-23-2009, 07:57 PM   #9
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120 amp sub panel


I'd look into CFL floodlights
I have one that uses 65w & states it produces the light of a 500w bulb
It puts out a lot of light

And the bulbs are less $$ then Halogen/mercury vapor
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Old 08-24-2009, 12:29 AM   #10
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120 amp sub panel


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the lights are 1000 watt 110v apiece

What they are Halogen or Metal Halide or High Pressure sodium ?

If latter two options normally are mutitapped ballast can change over from 120 to 240 volts without issue.

Now if that is Quatz Halogen I know 1000 w 120 volt is semi rare item normally they are straight 208 or 240 or 277 V bulb one of the three voltage it can get.

Scuba Dave mention 65 watts CFL bulb that will work ok up about 15 maybe 18 feet high anything higher is not worth it unless you get mulit head set up like two or three even four on one pole then it will work.

Normally with 1000 w HID's you need keep them up at least 20 feet or more due they are very bright I know how bright it will be

Other way you can do is get couple 400 watters HID Metal Halides per pole it will have about the same light level as single 1000 watter but more compact sizewise.

But if you have Quatz Halogen in first place that is ok if you used for few minutes with once a while use but if you going to use it pretty often then go with CFL or HID they last far much longer than Quatz Halogen and use less power than Quatz halogen itself

For 1000 watts Quatz Halogen it will be about 22,000 lumines { brightness } and about 500 to 2000 hours life
For 400 W Metal Halide it will be about 32,000 to 44,000 lumines and up to 24,000 hours life {18 to 22K is most common range }
For 65 watts CFL IIRC i think about 7,000 lumines but not sure due I can not find the manufacter listing to verify it but I know it will be about the same as 175 W Mercury Vapour is and with 65 w CFL the life is about 12 to 18,000 hours

But don't bother with Mercury Vapour it pretty much done history anyway. { old school and kinda power hog per today terms }

Merci,Marc

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