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Old 10-07-2013, 05:43 PM   #1
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12-2 for 240v ?


Hey all, I'm installing a Cadet 240v heater in a bathroom I'm remodeling and I was planning on running 12-3 but I see on their site recommending 12-2. Is it common practice to run 2 instead of 3 for a 240v load when the load doesn't account for a neutral and a ground? Thanks, 1

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Old 10-07-2013, 05:45 PM   #2
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12-2 for 240v ?


That would be because it is just two hots and a ground. Wire per manufacturer instructions. If you do pull 12/3, just cap off the White Neutral wire on both ends, use the Red & Black for the hots.

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Old 10-07-2013, 05:45 PM   #3
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12-2 for 240v ?


Yes, 12/2 is fine, just re-identify the white wire with some black tape or something.
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Old 10-07-2013, 05:58 PM   #4
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12-2 for 240v ?


Great, thanks for the info. I've got another question on a close topic.

I just moved my dryer to another room and ran 10-3 from the original box to the new one in the next room. The run from the panel to the box is a stranded wire that looks like about an 8ga 3 wire so I just wire nutted the stranded ground with the neutral and ground wire of the 10-3. my question is can I just leave that connection in an accessible box or should I run a new run from the panel to the dryer outlet? Thanks again, 1
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Old 10-07-2013, 06:13 PM   #5
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12-2 for 240v ?


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Originally Posted by 1dumbquestion View Post
Great, thanks for the info. I've got another question on a close topic.

I just moved my dryer to another room and ran 10-3 from the original box to the new one in the next room. The run from the panel to the box is a stranded wire that looks like about an 8ga 3 wire so I just wire nutted the stranded ground with the neutral and ground wire of the 10-3. my question is can I just leave that connection in an accessible box or should I run a new run from the panel to the dryer outlet? Thanks again, 1
DO NOT join the neutral with ground. If this is just a junction box to extend a circuit, it will be red to red, black to black, white to white and ground to ground.
Make sure you wrap one of the grounds around the screw at the back of the box.

Ideally you run a 10/3 right from the panel to the dryer receptacle but if that's not an option, the junction box must remain accessible.

Edit: Also make sure that #10 is sufficient for your dryer. Ive personally never seen one requiring #8 but you want to make sure. What size is the breaker?

Last edited by tfo411; 10-07-2013 at 06:16 PM.
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Old 10-07-2013, 06:26 PM   #6
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12-2 for 240v ?


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DO NOT join the neutral with ground. If this is just a junction box to extend a circuit, it will be red to red, black to black, white to white and ground to ground.
Make sure you wrap one of the grounds around the screw at the back of the box.

Ideally you run a 10/3 right from the panel to the dryer receptacle but if that's not an option, the junction box must remain accessible.

Edit: Also make sure that #10 is sufficient for your dryer. Ive personally never seen one requiring #8 but you want to make sure. What size is the breaker?

The breaker is a 30A but honestly I didn't see what the dryer recommends I just went off of what is normal for dryers. It's one of those new fancy LG's that the ladies likes so I'd better make sure. The existing wire from the panel to the original box only has 2 wires plus a ground and they are all stranded with the ground being loose so I can't really nut white to white. I was hoping to avoid it but maybe I better step up and just replace from the panel. Thanks, 1
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Old 10-07-2013, 06:40 PM   #7
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12-2 for 240v ?


10-3 from panel is best.
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Old 10-07-2013, 06:40 PM   #8
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12-2 for 240v ?


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The breaker is a 30A...
How many OTHER electric baseboard heaters do you have?
How many are on the same circuit as this unit?
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Old 10-07-2013, 06:52 PM   #9
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12-2 for 240v ?


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Originally Posted by TarheelTerp View Post
How many OTHER electric baseboard heaters do you have?
How many are on the same circuit as this unit?
The breaker question was in regards to his dryer.

#10 is good on a 30A breaker. Running a new 10/3 from the panel to the dryer is the way to go.
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Old 10-07-2013, 06:53 PM   #10
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12-2 for 240v ?


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How many OTHER electric baseboard heaters do you have?
How many are on the same circuit as this unit?

my fault for mixing topics: The 30A is dedicated to the dryer and I'm running a new 20A dedicated to the new cadet heater. Sorry for the confusion, 1
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Old 10-07-2013, 06:55 PM   #11
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12-2 for 240v ?


I should add to my last post about your dryer...The current setup is a safety concern and should be addressed as soon as possible.
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Old 10-07-2013, 08:27 PM   #12
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12-2 for 240v ?


If your old dryer circuit was 3-wire (no ground), you cannot extend it. Historically the code allowed 3-wire circuits for stoves and dryers, with the chassis of the appliance being bonded to the neutral wire. This is no longer allowed, and has not been for years. It is a significant safety hazard. If you want to move your old 3-wire dryer, you will need to run a new 4-wire circuit from the panel.
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Old 10-09-2013, 05:57 PM   #13
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12-2 for 240v ?


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If your old dryer circuit was 3-wire (no ground), you cannot extend it. Historically the code allowed 3-wire circuits for stoves and dryers, with the chassis of the appliance being bonded to the neutral wire. This is no longer allowed, and has not been for years. It is a significant safety hazard. If you want to move your old 3-wire dryer, you will need to run a new 4-wire circuit from the panel.
So I'll be running a new 10-3 tonight to replace my old and my temp wire I've had up for the last week or so. I've got a question (and it may seem stupid) but what is the concern with nutting the ground and neutral together in a box? I ask this because when I run the new wire the neutral and the ground will be screwed to a shared buss in my 40 year old panel essentially doing the same thing. Am I missing something major? I'm all ears. Thanks, 1
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Old 10-10-2013, 12:39 AM   #14
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12-2 for 240v ?


What happens if the connection of the neutral and grounds comes loose, or the shared neutral/ground wire gets cut or damaged? Electrified dryer frame. Not good. What happens if, on a 4-wire circuit, the neutral or ground connection in the panel comes loose? Not a disaster, it just doesn't work right or loses grounding. The hazard of the chassis becoming electrified from a loose neutral is eliminated by running the ground back to the panel bus separately from the neutral.

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