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Old 01-11-2011, 04:58 PM   #1
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110v lamp wired to 220v circuit?


Hi all, I'm now to DIY and enjoy reading your advice. I am trying to hard wire a 110v goose-neck lamp on to my 220v bandsaw. The zip cord from the lamp is 2-wire (black, white and no ground). Is it okay to wire the black to black and white to ground in the bandsaw switch? Thanks for your advice. David

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Old 01-11-2011, 05:03 PM   #2
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110v lamp wired to 220v circuit?


Whilst technically it should work,
provided the earth is tied to neutral some where,
How ever it is not considered good practice,
and might not be legal,
you will need to check the electrical codes in your area.

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Hi all, I'm now to DIY and enjoy reading your advice. I am trying to hard wire a 110v goose-neck lamp on to my 220v bandsaw. The zip cord from the lamp is 2-wire (black, white and no ground). Is it okay to wire the black to black and white to ground in the bandsaw switch? Thanks for your advice. David

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Old 01-11-2011, 05:30 PM   #3
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110v lamp wired to 220v circuit?


Hi dmxtothemax, thanks. Yes, technically it does work. When I wired in the lamp this way last evening, 110v power reached the lamp when I closed the switch for the 220v bandsaw. I've connected the neutral from the lamp to the ground of the 220v circuit. Can you please elaborate on what the problems might be? Why is it not considered good practice? Thanks.
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Old 01-11-2011, 05:32 PM   #4
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110v lamp wired to 220v circuit?


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Originally Posted by David Webb View Post
Hi dmxtothemax, thanks. Yes, technically it does work. When I wired in the lamp this way last evening, 110v power reached the lamp when I closed the switch for the 220v bandsaw. I've connected the neutral from the lamp to the ground of the 220v circuit. Can you please elaborate on what the problems might be? Why is it not considered good practice? Thanks.
It is not good practice because you are now turning the ground of the 220v into a CCC
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Old 01-11-2011, 05:47 PM   #5
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110v lamp wired to 220v circuit?


It is more than not good practice, it is dangerous! If you were to lose the ground going back to the panel at any point, the frame of your saw would become live. The best would be a shock, the worst is electrocution.

Plug the lamp into a 120 volt circuit next to the saw and be safe.
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Old 01-11-2011, 05:51 PM   #6
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110v lamp wired to 220v circuit?


Quote:
Originally Posted by David Webb View Post
Hi all, I'm now to DIY and enjoy reading your advice. I am trying to hard wire a 110v goose-neck lamp on to my 220v bandsaw. The zip cord from the lamp is 2-wire (black, white and no ground). Is it okay to wire the black to black and white to ground in the bandsaw switch? Thanks for your advice. David
NO it is neither legal nor safe. You will be using the ground as a current carrying conductor. Not only can it cause an unsafe condition with the saw, it imparts current on the entire grounding conductor for that circuit which could cause problems anywhere that circuit runs.


what can happen with the saw is if you are in contact with the saw and touch another grounded item, if there is less resistance through you, the current will pass through you. This could realistically be lethal.

I did some work at a factory that had done a similar thing with some 3 phase equipment. They asked me why they often saw a spark when they passed sheets of metal down a conveyor and the metal touched a separate machine. It's because the path through the other machine allowed current to flow on the grounding conductor at that machine as well.
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Old 01-11-2011, 06:08 PM   #7
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110v lamp wired to 220v circuit?


Thanks all. This is very much appreciated. You've save me great danger, obviously. It seemed like such an elegant work around. But obviously not. Thanks again to you for taking the time to let me know. Best wishes, David.
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Old 01-11-2011, 06:31 PM   #8
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110v lamp wired to 220v circuit?


Simply plug that lamp into another 120 Volt outlet. Lacking that, a control transformer of sufficient wattage could be utilized.
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Old 01-11-2011, 10:28 PM   #9
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110v lamp wired to 220v circuit?


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Originally Posted by David Webb View Post
Thanks all. This is very much appreciated. You've save me great danger, obviously. It seemed like such an elegant work around. But obviously not. Thanks again to you for taking the time to let me know. Best wishes, David.
Yeah, you'll find lots of equipment with lamps and controls wired this way. It's a bad idea. It really is dangerous. If the ground wire ever breaks or loses continuity, the entire machine will become electrified.

If you really want the light to be powered by the machine, you can do one of three things:
1: Run a neutral wire to the machine, and power it from a four-wire (hot, hot, neutral, ground) circuit.
2: Use a small transformer (usually called a "control transformer") to convert the 240V to 120V. These transformers are available at electrical supply stores for about $20-$30.
3: Use a 240V light. Many fluorescent lights are available with multi-voltage ballasts that will accept 240V.
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Old 01-11-2011, 10:54 PM   #10
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110v lamp wired to 220v circuit?


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Originally Posted by mpoulton View Post
Yeah, you'll find lots of equipment with lamps and controls wired this way. It's a bad idea. It really is dangerous. If the ground wire ever breaks or loses continuity, the entire machine will become electrified.

If you really want the light to be powered by the machine, you can do one of three things:
1: Run a neutral wire to the machine, and power it from a four-wire (hot, hot, neutral, ground) circuit.
2: Use a small transformer (usually called a "control transformer") to convert the 240V to 120V. These transformers are available at electrical supply stores for about $20-$30.
3: Use a 240V light. Many fluorescent lights are available with multi-voltage ballasts that will accept 240V.
If you reconferaged to 240 volts lamp you have to make a warning label or a sign that the lamp is wired for 240 volts in case someone try to stick in 120 volt bulb in the 240 volts socket it can do pretty good damage.

The safest methold is run the luminarie on 120v indepent of the equiment otherwise a small transfomer something like 150va will work they should be about 20 to 25 Euros { you may end up put in a fuse holder for transfomer or the transfomer self protected or included a circuit breaker } which it will down step from 240 volts to 120 volts that useally slove most of the issue.

Merci.
Marc
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Old 01-11-2011, 11:31 PM   #11
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110v lamp wired to 220v circuit?


You could also put two identical 110v lamps in series. Not sure if doing something like this would be against code though, I can't say I've ever heard of someone doing that.
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Old 01-12-2011, 06:35 AM   #12
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110v lamp wired to 220v circuit?


Quote:
Originally Posted by dmxtothemax View Post
Whilst technically it should work,
provided the earth is tied to neutral some where,
How ever it is not considered good practice,
and might not be legal,
you will need to check the electrical codes in your area.
"not considered good practice"?
"might not be legal"?
"check the electrical codes"?

I'll reiterate the others comments.

- It's not "poor practice". It is DANGEROUS and stupid.
- It certainly is illegal (or more accurately non-compliant) and NEVER was!
- See last sentence.


Dude, if this is the kind of electrical advice you are going to be giving I suggest you refrain from giving ANY at all.
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Old 01-12-2011, 07:12 AM   #13
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110v lamp wired to 220v circuit?


Any saw that uses a lamp, uses a four wire connection, so that there is a Neutral to allow for 120vac.
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Old 01-12-2011, 08:46 AM   #14
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110v lamp wired to 220v circuit?


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Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
Any saw that uses a lamp, uses a four wire connection, so that there is a Neutral to allow for 120vac.
Many use a small transformer just for a lamp, and sometimes for a 120v control circuit if contactors are involved.
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Old 01-12-2011, 04:22 PM   #15
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110v lamp wired to 220v circuit?


Last time I checked it was a free country,
and I am allow to say what I want!
Weather you agree with it or not!
is completely irelivent.
Nothing I said was wrong!
I stand by what I said.



Dude, if this is the kind of electrical advice you are going to be giving I suggest you refrain from giving ANY at all.[/quote]

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