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Old 09-25-2009, 10:10 AM   #1
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100 amps on a stove wire?


Can cabling used for stoves actually support 100 amps? I had someone tell me that and I was surprised. Figured I needed like 2 awg cabling for 100 amps.

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Old 09-25-2009, 11:05 AM   #2
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100 amps on a stove wire?


My stove is #6 wire which I think is rated for 65a Max

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Old 09-25-2009, 11:11 AM   #3
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100 amps on a stove wire?


It will support it, but it's hard to say for how long. Start to have a little heat issue after a while. It's not code (NEC) compliant if that's what you are asking.

Last edited by jerryh3; 09-25-2009 at 11:14 AM.
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Old 09-25-2009, 11:23 AM   #4
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100 amps on a stove wire?


It's true that conductors can carry much more current that the NEC says they are RATED for. Rated is the keyword. Its a rule, not a fact. I have seen small conductors carry ten or twenty times the current they are rated for. That does not mean you can apply this high current to conductors, as the NEC sets the limits in Article 310.
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Old 09-25-2009, 01:28 PM   #5
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100 amps on a stove wire?


Yeah what the code says is basically what I needed. Technically a phone line cable could probably handle 50 amps if more, but for how long?

Though if stove cable can handle 65 amps would it be to code to use it to run a sub panel (60 amp in this case)?
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Old 09-25-2009, 02:11 PM   #6
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100 amps on a stove wire?


Yes, I used #6 to run a 60a sub to my pool cabana
2 #6 hots, white #6 neutral, #8 green ground
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Old 09-25-2009, 02:55 PM   #7
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100 amps on a stove wire?


Good to know, I may just in fact do this. It's ok if I use a 100 amp panel right? I would get a 60 amp breaker in the main panel so that breaker would trip if the load is over 60 amps.
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Old 09-25-2009, 03:00 PM   #8
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100 amps on a stove wire?


Yup, that's what I did
60a breaker in the main panel feeding a 100a panel with a 100a main breaker

I like subs with a main breaker
Even my 100a sub right next to the 200a main has a 100a main breaker
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Old 09-25-2009, 03:58 PM   #9
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100 amps on a stove wire?


xxxxxxxxxx

Last edited by Yoyizit; 09-25-2009 at 04:19 PM.
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Old 09-25-2009, 04:04 PM   #10
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100 amps on a stove wire?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Yoyizit View Post
16 gauge copper wire: Tmelt = 1083C, Area = 2581 circ mil, Time = 5 sec,diam = .0524 inches, Tamb = 25C

E= Area in CM
B = Tmelt - Tamb in deg. C
D = 234-Tambient in deg. C
T= time in seconds.
So, E = 2581, B= 1058, D=209, T=5
Then
Ifuse = E* SQRT {<LOG[(B/D)+1]>/(T*33)}
Ifuse = 2581* SQRT {<LOG[(1058/210)+1]>/165}
Ifuse = 2581* SQRT {<LOG(6.04)>/165}
Ifuse = 2581* SQRT {0.781/165}
Ifuse = 2581* SQRT {.00473}
Ifuse = 2581* 0.0688
Ifuse = 178A
What revelance does this have to the OP question, he was asking a simple question. He didn't want some drawn out equation that only engineers would learn about. This is way over my head, think how much further over the head of the OP it is.
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Old 09-25-2009, 04:10 PM   #11
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100 amps on a stove wire?


Quote:
Originally Posted by darren View Post
What revelance does this have to the OP question, he was asking a simple question. He didn't want some drawn out equation that only engineers would learn about. This is way over my head, think how much further over the head of the OP it is.
My bad.
This seems to be more relevant to JV's reply.

It will help you if you have to know how fuses work, though. . .IT ratings and all that.

Last edited by Yoyizit; 09-25-2009 at 04:22 PM.
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Old 09-25-2009, 06:32 PM   #12
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100 amps on a stove wire?


Quote:
Originally Posted by Yoyizit View Post

It will help you if you have to know how fuses work, though. . .IT ratings and all that.
Once again, unless you are en engineer, who cares???
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Answers based on the 2008 & 2011 NEC. If you're on the '14 already I feel sorry for you.
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Old 09-25-2009, 07:59 PM   #13
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100 amps on a stove wire?


If you had a stove (maybe you own a restaurant) that needed that much current, you would string the #2 or so wires. It would be the same thing as stringing service entrance cable.

In practice just about anyone needing that many BTU's would use natural gas or propane instead of electricity given the overall energy cost.
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Last edited by AllanJ; 09-25-2009 at 08:01 PM.
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Old 09-26-2009, 12:11 AM   #14
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100 amps on a stove wire?


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Originally Posted by Scuba_Dave View Post
Yes, I used #6 to run a 60a sub to my pool cabana
2 #6 hots, white #6 neutral, #8 green ground
That's good to know, I might go for a 60 amp sub. Now I only see 200 and 100 amp panels in the store. Would it be ok to use a 100 amp panel provided the breaker that feeds it is a 60? I can't see why not as the main may never trip but the one that feeds it will, so the cable will never be overloaded.
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Old 09-26-2009, 07:04 AM   #15
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100 amps on a stove wire?


Yup, that's what I did
60a breaker in the main panel feeding a 100a panel with a 100a main breaker

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