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Old 04-23-2009, 01:00 AM   #1
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woodstove exhaust question


hey all,

I am working in the basement of my cottage and would like to put in a woodstove. I am just wondering if it is possible and if it is ok to tie in the chimney pipe from that stove with the one upstairs?

The stove upstairs is a simple black pipe that goes through the roof and out. I am thinking about doing the same with the basement stove, but merging the two pipes (if it's possible)

thanks,
John

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Old 04-23-2009, 07:14 AM   #2
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woodstove exhaust question


No. It is against any code I've ever heard of.

Two stove (or two of any appliance) cannot use the same chimney (aka exhaust pipe).

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Old 04-23-2009, 07:38 AM   #3
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woodstove exhaust question


Do NOT run a single wall pipe through any wall or roof!

Gary
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Old 04-23-2009, 09:52 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by dac122 View Post
No. It is against any code I've ever heard of.

Two stove (or two of any appliance) cannot use the same chimney (aka exhaust pipe).
Code for both oil, and gas allow it.

Code allows both a gas and oil appliance to use the same chimney.

Wood, coal, your asking for trouble.

Soild fuel, use separate chimneys.
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Old 04-23-2009, 10:14 AM   #5
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woodstove exhaust question


It's called fire protection. If you have a single wall flue, properly assembled and surronded by air', it is considered non-combustible. If that same pipe touches ANY combustible product; wood, paper, plastic, gas, cloth, fur, etc. you won't have a cottage to work in very soon. THAT is why.
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Old 04-23-2009, 11:09 AM   #6
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woodstove exhaust question


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Originally Posted by fast1 View Post
may i ask why?
All pipes, stoves, or anything that carries hot gases has a clearance rating. Clearance is the minimum safe distance from combustibles. Violation of that distance means you run the risk of fire.

The clearance is usually listed in inches, varying from few to many inches. Double walled chimney pipe, wall thimbles for instance have very low clearance around 2 inches. Single wall chimney pipe has much larger clearances, and I've never seen it recommended for use when passing through a roof/ceiling or wall.

If that's your situation you need to correct it yesterday! Your local codes office should be a nice resource for doing it right.
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Old 04-23-2009, 11:16 AM   #7
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All pipes, stoves, or anything that carries hot gases has a clearance rating. Clearance is the minimum safe distance from combustibles. Violation of that distance means you run the risk of fire.

The clearance is usually listed in inches, varying from few to many inches. Double walled chimney pipe, wall thimbles for instance have very low clearance around 2 inches. Single wall chimney pipe has much larger clearances, and I've never seen it recommended for use when passing through a roof/ceiling or wall.

If that's your situation you need to correct it yesterday! Your local codes office should be a nice resource for doing it right.
Not only that but you will get more creosote build up in a single wall pipe when there is cold air around it. Also I have seen people install them the wrong way. Besides that they are thin and flimsy.

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Old 04-23-2009, 04:10 PM   #8
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ok, so to add a second wood burning stove I would have to run a chimney up the outside of the structure?

I am pretty sure the chimney is double walled. It goes up through the ceiling roof. the area above the woodstove is an open space/loft, about 20 feet up to the roof.
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Old 04-23-2009, 05:50 PM   #9
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ok, so to add a second wood burning stove I would have to run a chimney up the outside of the structure?
Yep, unless the original was sized for both.
I am pretty sure the chimney is double walled. It goes up through the ceiling roof. the area above the woodstove is an open space/loft, about 20 feet up to the roof.
Round here it is tripple wall
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Old 04-23-2009, 07:53 PM   #10
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Double wall pipe is not legal for solid fuel (wood, coal) due to temperature and most double wall is aluminum inside pipe. Triple wall is stainless steel.
Double wall piping cannot be run up the exterior of the structure without being insulated and boxed in.
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Old 04-23-2009, 08:07 PM   #11
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Everything here is double wall
My soapstone stove was installed with 2x wall & inspected
Single pipe to the ceiling thimble, 2x after that

This is what I have seen installed, 2x wall stainless

http://www.northlineexpress.com/category/6Simpson.asp

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DuraTech is a double-wall all-fuel chimney system with both U.S. and Canadian approvals for specific applications and is UL-103 HT listed
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Originally Posted by tk03 View Post
Double wall pipe is not legal for solid fuel (wood, coal) due to temperature and most double wall is aluminum inside pipe. Triple wall is stainless steel.
Double wall piping cannot be run up the exterior of the structure without being insulated and boxed in.
I've never seen 2x wall boxed in here
Plenty of installations up the outside walls

Last edited by Scuba_Dave; 04-23-2009 at 08:35 PM.
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Old 04-23-2009, 08:28 PM   #12
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I think he was thinking of B vent.

They make double stainless steel for wood stoves.

Double wall for wood stoves should be a sealed double wall, to aid in preventing creosote formation/deposits.
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Old 04-23-2009, 08:50 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by silky View Post
hey all,

I am working in the basement of my cottage and would like to put in a woodstove. I am just wondering if it is possible and if it is ok to tie in the chimney pipe from that stove with the one upstairs?

The stove upstairs is a simple black pipe that goes through the roof and out. I am thinking about doing the same with the basement stove, but merging the two pipes (if it's possible)

thanks,
John


If you are going to tie these 2 together. .. the vent pipe after the tie in would have to be large enough to handle 2 stoves at the same time & handle the x tra heat


single wall vent is 6'' clearence to combustible material is not to be conceald or used in uncondition space. ie, attic crawl space etc,
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Old 04-23-2009, 09:10 PM   #14
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woodstove exhaust question


im gonna be honest, I don't know what the pipe is. Next time I am there I will find out. I know for sure that it goes through the ceiling but that's about all i know.
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Old 04-24-2009, 09:06 AM   #15
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woodstove exhaust question


I see it is a double insulated pipe which is OK for your application. It still requires to be boxed it per the I&O manual.

Cold Climates: In cold climates, chimneys mounted on an outside wall
should be enclosed. Exterior chases reduce condensation and creosote
formation, and enhance draft. Include an access door by the Tee Cleanout
Cap for chimney cleaning. See the detailed drawing on page 18.

See figure 23 on page 18.
http://www.northlineexpress.com/Imag...structions.pdf

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