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-   -   Venting my bathroom - Should this be done? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f17/venting-my-bathroom-should-done-10911/)

fjacky 08-22-2007 07:12 AM

Venting my bathroom - Should this be done?
 
I want to vent my bathroom. If I vent through the ceiling to the attic and out the side of my house I'll have to travel over 20-25 feet. I think that's too far, and I also have very limited space in my attic. Here is what I want to do. I have an inline duct fan, which is powerful enough to vent the air. I want to directly vent it out the side of my house. It is located on top of the bathroom window. The fan is approx 6 inches long and it will fit perfectly. I will wire it to my light which is very close. I will make sure its done safely. On the outside I will put a dryer vent on the fan with flaps on it so critters and the cold wont come in. It seems to be easy enough, am I overlooking anything here?

Your thoughts?

KUIPORNG 08-22-2007 10:42 AM

My only concern with this approach is the ability to keep the cold air from coming in part.... depends on where you live... this may not be an issue... but if you live in freezing temperature area... the flaps from outside may not be sufficient...... Also some code requires venting fan be GFCI protected...

fjacky 08-22-2007 10:49 AM

The winters are quite cold. I was wondering about that part too. I was hoping that the flaps would help with that. As far as the GFI. It will have one. The system will also be hooked up with a 30 minute timer.

But really, it I vented thru the roof, the cold would be right there too right?

skymaster 08-22-2007 11:20 AM

FJ, If you are using a proper vent fan they all have a check valve right at the attach point for the vent pipe, plus as you said use the vents that have the "shutter" type closure NOT the old metal single flap.INSULATE around the pipe as much as possible, warm,humid air hitting ICE COLD pipe equals a disaster in winter
JackM

fjacky 08-22-2007 11:30 AM

2 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by skymaster (Post 58976)
FJ, If you are using a proper vent fan they all have a check valve right at the attach point for the vent pipe, plus as you said use the vents that have the "shutter" type closure NOT the old metal single flap.INSULATE around the pipe as much as possible, warm,humid air hitting ICE COLD pipe equals a disaster in winter
JackM

SO basically you are saying that my method of venting directly out over my window would be bad... since the distance from the inside to outside would only be 6 inches or so. And the fan I was going to use is an inline duct fan. it has no flap, only the louvre style vent. See attachment.

KUIPORNG 08-22-2007 02:23 PM

consider it is a bathroom which means being warm is an important factor... I wouldn't want to do what you said....

fjacky 08-22-2007 04:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KUI****G (Post 59012)
consider it is a bathroom which means being warm is an important factor... I wouldn't want to do what you said....

Believe me, that's what has stopped me from doing this so far. The hole (where the fan will be) is 7.5 feet from the floor. But if I vented through the ceiling, and through the roof, the duct would only run a few feet, so wouldn't the cold sneak in that way too?

MechanicalDVR 08-22-2007 05:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by fjacky (Post 59043)
Believe me, that's what has stopped me from doing this so far. The hole (where the fan will be) is 7.5 feet from the floor. But if I vented through the ceiling, and through the roof, the duct would only run a few feet, so wouldn't the cold sneak in that way too?

You would have a backdraft damper in the riser if going out through the roof.

fjacky 08-22-2007 06:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MechanicalDVR (Post 59056)
You would have a backdraft damper in the riser if going out through the roof.

I was hoping the louvre dryer vent on the outside was gonna do the trick.

Guess not. Back to the drawing board.

wooderson 08-22-2007 07:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KUI****G (Post 58966)
My only concern with this approach is the ability to keep the cold air from coming in part.... depends on where you live... this may not be an issue... but if you live in freezing temperature area... the flaps from outside may not be sufficient...... Also some code requires venting fan be GFCI protected...

Just wondering what article of the nec says a bath fan needs to be gfci protected? Unless the fan is within 6 feet of a water source which I doubt.

KUIPORNG 08-23-2007 08:07 AM

consider fan extracting moisture... gfci protected doesn't seem a bad idea... in fact.. it doesn't hurt doing so ... just put it to the downstream of the gfci outlet...

shawn T 08-23-2007 09:15 AM

The whole reason to install a bath fan is to remove moisture laden air. Bathroom exhaust fans are designed for this from the material its made from to the backdraft louver that is built into it. An inline duct fan is not designed for the high humidity air and may fail prematurely. Twenty five feet of duct should not be a problem for a good quality fan. Just dont get a builders model, they are louder, dont live as long, and dont work as well. The fans come with different cfm ratings, if you want more air moved get one that is rated higher.

skymaster 08-23-2007 12:38 PM

NUTONE:yes:

fjacky 08-23-2007 12:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by shawn T (Post 59198)
The whole reason to install a bath fan is to remove moisture laden air. Bathroom exhaust fans are designed for this from the material its made from to the backdraft louver that is built into it. An inline duct fan is not designed for the high humidity air and may fail prematurely. Twenty five feet of duct should not be a problem for a good quality fan. Just dont get a builders model, they are louder, dont live as long, and dont work as well. The fans come with different cfm ratings, if you want more air moved get one that is rated higher.

I'm not worried about the longevity. I have installed proper vents and they fail quick enough as it is, or at least the suction drops. I'm juts looking for an easier way to replace when this happens. I just am not sure about the cold air coming in

HouseHelper 08-23-2007 02:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wooderson (Post 59077)
Just wondering what article of the nec says a bath fan needs to be gfci protected? Unless the fan is within 6 feet of a water source which I doubt.

The NEC does not state that a bathroom vent needs to be GFCI protected. However, the installation instructions for the vent states that GFCI protection is required when installing inside a shower or bath area (as in directly over the tub). Since the NEC does state that equipment must be installed per manufacturers instructions, the GFCI would be required in that case.


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