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Old 08-12-2012, 11:02 PM   #1
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Utility room Heat issue


What should be done in a utility room that has a gas water heater and electric dryer and washer of course? To remove heat? There is no ac vent.

I understand that you cant use an exhaust fan do to the gas water heater?

What can be done?

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Old 08-13-2012, 08:38 AM   #2
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Utility room Heat issue


Natural venting is one way. Problem with an exhaust vent, is that without something to put air in there, yes you end up with a pressurization problem. Drawing of the floor plan, showing the utility room in relation to the outside wall.

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Old 08-13-2012, 05:48 PM   #3
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Utility room Heat issue


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Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
Natural venting is one way. Problem with an exhaust vent, is that without something to put air in there, yes you end up with a pressurization problem. Drawing of the floor plan, showing the utility room in relation to the outside wall.

So are you saying that, if the utility room is open to the kitchen and airflow can come from there, you could use an exhaust fan?

basically the following represents the layout


kitchen/breakfast area/utility room with backdoor
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Old 08-13-2012, 05:52 PM   #4
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Utility room Heat issue


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Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
Natural venting is one way. Problem with an exhaust vent, is that without something to put air in there, yes you end up with a pressurization problem. Drawing of the floor plan, showing the utility room in relation to the outside wall.
If there were going to be a pressurization problem, wouldn't it have already occurred when the dryer is running, provided its vented to the outside?
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Old 08-13-2012, 06:06 PM   #5
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Utility room Heat issue


Here is the area:

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Old 08-13-2012, 09:23 PM   #6
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Utility room Heat issue


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Originally Posted by digitalplumber View Post
So are you saying that, if the utility room is open to the kitchen and airflow can come from there, you could use an exhaust fan?

basically the following represents the layout


kitchen/breakfast area/utility room with backdoor
No, and where did you conceive that thought. Nothing of the kind was stated what you just interpreted from what I stated.
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:24 PM   #7
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If there were going to be a pressurization problem, wouldn't it have already occurred when the dryer is running, provided its vented to the outside?
Only if it is in the closed space with the furnace & water heater, and there is no way for make up air. And people wonder why the governing bodies in states have had to create laws to make it that CO detectors are required in residences.
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:27 PM   #8
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Utility room Heat issue


digital plumber, what is happening, is that any air leaks around doors, or through the duct work for the dryer, or even pulling through an hvac duct work that enters the space, the water heater will pull from that through convection drafting, for make up air.

There is a reason why the NFPA has created strict guidelines, along with states in that enclosed spaces have to have X amount of make up air, or fresh air exchange, so that a build up of Carbon Monoxide does not build up in a structure, because of combustible appliances, such as furnaces, water heaters, stoves, fire places.
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:29 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
No, and where did you conceive that thought. Nothing of the kind was stated what you just interpreted from what I stated.
Please chill!

I read your statement "without something to put air in there" so I thought this meant any air from anywhere so I simply asked. if the air coming from the ajoining kitchen would suffice.

But as you now have stated, no, I understand.

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Old 08-13-2012, 09:32 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
digital plumber, what is happening, is that any air leaks around doors, or through the duct work for the dryer, or even pulling through an hvac duct work that enters the space, the water heater will pull from that through convection drafting, for make up air.

There is a reason why the NFPA has created strict guidelines, along with states in that enclosed spaces have to have X amount of make up air, or fresh air exchange, so that a build up of Carbon Monoxide does not build up in a structure, because of combustible appliances, such as furnaces, water heaters, stoves, fire places.

I have no problem with anything you have said and or are suggesting. I came here to find out what to do, and will do it according to code if necessary.

So based on what I am reading so far we have 2 choices:

1.) natural open vent to the attic, which we wont do
2.) ac vent in the area
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:34 PM   #11
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Utility room Heat issue


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Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
Only if it is in the closed space with the furnace & water heater, and there is no way for make up air. And people wonder why the governing bodies in states have had to create laws to make it that CO detectors are required in residences.

the dryer is electric, if that matters.

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Old 08-13-2012, 09:36 PM   #12
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Utility room Heat issue


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Originally Posted by digitalplumber View Post
the dryer is electric, if that matters.

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Really irrelevant, because 99.99% of the dryers made are electric.
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:39 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by digitalplumber View Post
I have no problem with anything you have said and or are suggesting. I came here to find out what to do, and will do it according to code if necessary.

So based on what I am reading so far we have 2 choices:

1.) natural open vent to the attic, which we wont do
2.) ac vent in the area
None will do. With the utility room, because it has the water heater, it really should have venting to the outside, not attic. How do you think fires spread or CO spreads. Same happens with a/c vents. As for finding out what to do, suggest going downtown to talk to the local AHJ to find out what their take is on proper ventilation, but first start with a blower door test to see how air tight the house is. Most utilities will do it and then charge your utility bill, but helps to know which direction to go next.
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:39 PM   #14
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Utility room Heat issue


So the million dollar question is:

Which produces the most heat the gas water heater or the dryer, into the room?

Maybe move the water heater to the attic?
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Old 08-13-2012, 09:42 PM   #15
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Utility room Heat issue


Quote:
Originally Posted by gregzoll View Post
None will do. With the utility room, because it has the water heater, it really should have venting to the outside, not attic. How do you think fires spread or CO spreads. Same happens with a/c vents. As for finding out what to do, suggest going downtown to talk to the local AHJ to find out what their take is on proper ventilation, but first start with a blower door test to see how air tight the house is. Most utilities will do it and then charge your utility bill, but helps to know which direction to go next.


Confused as to what venting you are talking about, the gas water heater is vented thru the ceiling to the attic. Not looking to change that.

The vent I refered to was just on open vent in the room to allow the heat to escape, not vent the gas water heater into the attic. I no better than that.

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