Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > HVAC

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 10-01-2009, 06:39 PM   #16
Hvac Pro
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Winnipeg, Canada
Posts: 9,822
Rewards Points: 282
Default

Tiny elbows on meter?


7"WC from the meter to the furnace/appliance. Furnace gas valve reg drops it to 3.5"WC for the burner. That regulator drops it from 60 psi to the required 7-10"WC.

yuri is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2009, 07:07 PM   #17
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 26,080
Rewards Points: 3,820
Default

Tiny elbows on meter?


The meter and all other piping to the street is gas company property. DO NOT TOUCH IT.

House side pressure varies with gas companies. Many are 6 to 8"
Some are 2 PSIG.
There should be a tag on the meter.Saying what it is.
beenthere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-01-2009, 10:46 PM   #18
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 412
Rewards Points: 254
Default

Tiny elbows on meter?


I guess the whole house drops down to 1/2 PSI on the meter. It says 1/2 PSI on the meter, but does not say the inches of water column.

I have an appliance that is looking for 4" and not sure if I should put a regulator before it.

Last edited by pcampbell; 10-01-2009 at 10:50 PM.
pcampbell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2009, 05:12 AM   #19
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 26,080
Rewards Points: 3,820
Default

Tiny elbows on meter?


Is it looking for a 4" supply, or is that the min supply pressure.
beenthere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2009, 01:29 PM   #20
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 412
Rewards Points: 254
Default

Tiny elbows on meter?


It only lists 4" as the manifold pressure, no other numbers (except 10" for propane).
pcampbell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-02-2009, 05:04 PM   #21
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 26,080
Rewards Points: 3,820
Default

Tiny elbows on meter?


Manifold pressure is not supply pressure.
Manifold pressure is what the gas valve supplies to the burner.

You need to reread the install instructions.
They will tell you if you need an appliance regulator.
beenthere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2009, 03:24 PM   #22
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 412
Rewards Points: 254
Default

Tiny elbows on meter?


Could you clarify how a typical home gas system works? My undestanding was that at the meter, the pressure is brought down to 1/2 PSI. Not sure where that is done, via an internal or external regulator.

Otherwise all of the various shut off valves around my house that say MAX 1/2 PSI would be void. What about all of the various appliances (gas stove, water heater, etc). I don't see any regulators on these either.

As a result of this wouldn't my meter be regulating the flow to 1/2 PSI?

Do most household appliances have the regulator built in or do they go off of whatever " of water column come off the pipe?

The manual for the oven (it is a very simple commercial pizza oven, with gas input, shut off valve, thermostat, going to a simple burner) is incomplete. It talks about a regulator, but there is no mention of specifics of type or size. It just says the manifold pressure is 4" water column.

Thanks.
pcampbell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-05-2009, 03:38 PM   #23
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 26,080
Rewards Points: 3,820
Default

Tiny elbows on meter?


Depends on which meter you have. A few have built in pressure reducers. Some are external.

The " PSIG rating is the standard rating for max supply pressure to residential equipment, and appliance gas valves. Many gas shut off valve seals aren't designed to hold back more pressure then that. Residential appliances have gas valves that have built in regulators, the reduce the " PSIG(in reality usually 8" or less) to the 3.5" pressure of most manifolds.

Many commercial ovens only have an opening and closing valve.(pressure supplied to it, is the same pressure that comes out of it) It doesn't have a regulator. One must be provided and installed before the gas valve.

What BTU rating is this commercial oven?
Your current meter and may not be large enough to handle the volume of gas when other appliances are in use at the same time.
beenthere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2009, 07:42 AM   #24
Member
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: New Jersey
Posts: 412
Rewards Points: 254
Default

Tiny elbows on meter?


It is only 60,000 BTU on the data plate, but at 3.5" (again according to the manual). I was curious to understand this because if it specified to be 60k BTU @ 3.5", but I'm really at 7"-8" W.C. as you say, I believe this would be significantly more BTUs/hour (say, 90+k BTU/hour, as per http://www.andersonforrester.com/ori...s/default.html). It does not feel like 90,000 BTU though, but I don't know. My best comparison is a 100k BTU/hour cactus burner, which is intense heat.

I have it hooked up right next to the meter and nothing else is running at the same time. Meter is rated to 275 CFH.

The reason for all of this is I wanted to understand the true amount of gas it is using in present configuration, as I may need to increase the heat output by changing the orifice. Thanks again for the clarifications.
pcampbell is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 10-06-2009, 10:54 AM   #25
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 26,080
Rewards Points: 3,820
Default

Tiny elbows on meter?


If its UL listing is 60,000, DON"T try to increase its output.

If you need more output. Buy a bigger oven.

What is the combined BTU rating of all of your gas appliances.

beenthere is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Frozen water meter stubborn1 Plumbing 5 01-26-2009 07:35 AM
Basement water meter below floor level redfox1 Plumbing 5 12-10-2008 09:20 PM
Does it matter how close your panel is to your meter? jamiedolan Electrical 10 10-18-2008 05:38 AM
Meter ratings Stubbie Electrical 3 04-02-2008 11:12 PM
200A Upgrade - Meter Socket Location Question bjones Electrical 2 11-12-2007 04:03 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.