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Old 12-04-2006, 09:18 PM   #1
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Thermostat question


My son's room has been getting very cold in the morning, much colder than the hallway where our thermostat is.

To fix this, I think it would make sense to have the thermostat's temperature sensor in my son's room, but have the actual thermostat still in the hallway so that the thermostat kicks on the heat if it gets cold in my son's room, but I can still access the thermostat without having to go into his room.

Can anyone recommend the best and/or easiest/cheapest way to do this?

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Old 12-05-2006, 06:56 AM   #2
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Thermostat question


Its an air flow issue, not a thermostat issue. If you sense his room, the rest of the house will be too hot. Work on air flow not the t-stat. Look for a partialy blocked heat run, or a closed damper. You may need to install a "scoop and damper"take off st the trunk line to "grab" more air for that room.

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Old 12-05-2006, 08:11 AM   #3
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Thermostat question


I'm pretty sure it's not an airflow issue -- usually the problem is that in the mornings, the heat does not kick on as much in the upstairs of my house, where the bedrooms are.

I think this may be because in the morning, I have the downstairs set up to heat up about 6 degrees, and all the hot air is going up the stairwell into the upstairs hallway, where the upstairs thermostat is. But my son's bedroom door is closed, so the hot air is not making it in there, and the thermostat doesn't kick on the heat because the temperature has gone up in the hallway. Does my theory make sense?

I guess I could try setting the temperature in the upstairs to go up a couple of degrees in the morning to compensate for when the downstairs heat kicks on.
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Old 12-05-2006, 03:18 PM   #4
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Thermostat question


CTOWN asked:

Does my theory make sense?

It could make sense if you have two furnaces controlled by two separate thermostats. In that case, the hot air from the furnace downstairs could prevent the upstairs furnace to turn on. In that were the case, not only your son's room would be cold, so would be the rest of the rooms upstairs.

Have you taken actual measurements, or the problem was determined by mere human perceptions?

If you have only one furnace, it is now turned on by the thermostat downstairs (as you reported), regardless of the thermostat upstairs. Restricted air flow sounds more like a possible cause. Even if the vent delivers good flow, the return could be impaired by a closed door.

Good luck with the troubleshooting
Abel
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Old 12-05-2006, 03:26 PM   #5
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Thermostat question


Capaz-

Yes, I have two thermostats controlling two different furnaces. Sorry, I should have mentioned that from the start.

And yes, the other rooms get cold, though I think my son's gets colder than the rest since it's the only room that doesn't have a southern or eastern window. Also, the other rooms upstairs have their doors open, so the warm air from downstairs is able to reach those rooms (my son's door is closed).

I've put a thermometer in my son's room, and the temperature drops about 2-3 degrees in about an hour in the morning after the heat kicks on downstairs.
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Old 12-05-2006, 04:02 PM   #6
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Thermostat question


You wrote:

And yes, the other rooms get cold, though I think my son's gets colder than the rest since it's the only room that doesn't have a southern or eastern window. Also, the other rooms upstairs have their doors open, so the warm air from downstairs is able to reach those rooms (my son's door is closed).

So, it is a flow problem, the diagnostic from ACEFURNACEFIXER was accurate.

The problem will not be fixed by merely moving the thermostat to your son's room.

As ACE mentioned before, if you move the thermostat to his room, that is your son's not ACEFURNACEFIXER 's, (Gotta have some fun) the rest of the rooms upstairs would be much hotter.

There are many remedies to increase the air flow by, for example, restricting flow to the other rooms to balance upstairs ....although the most expeditious and cheaper one is to leave his door open....

Abel
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Old 12-05-2006, 04:25 PM   #7
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Thermostat question


Unfortunately, opening his door would probably result in him waking up earlier due to noise, and I'd like for him to be able to sleep in (he just turned 2).

I think I will try setting the temperature to go up a couple of degrees in the morning in the upstairs. If the other rooms are too warm, then that's no big deal since I'm usually downstairs at that time.
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Old 12-05-2006, 04:46 PM   #8
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Thermostat question


Well, in addition to opening the door ACE and I offered some other options, which you are not considering.

If the hot air is not going into the room, changing the thermostat is not going to make much of a change without changing the other rooms significantly. The upstairs is unbalanced, that the first problem to fix.

One more suggestion... a portable electric heater, the kind that looks like a baseboard heater, which are quiet and don't get very hot which would burn an inquisitive two year old.... you could set it up with a timer if you so desire.

Abel

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