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-   -   Small H2O line running up woodburing stove (http://www.diychatroom.com/f17/small-h2o-line-running-up-woodburing-stove-93121/)

mibson 01-22-2011 02:20 PM

Small H2O line running up woodburing stove exhaust?
 
I have a free standing wood burning stove (recently cleaned and inspected and meets code). The pipe that the smoke exits the house goes up and into the wall; once in the wall the pipe travels out of the house out of sight through a rectangular framed area about 2x3feet in size (the furnace exhaust also travels through this framed area.

There were speaker wires running through this rectangular framed area; so I used these old speaker wires to pull a small clear plastic water line (the type you use to hook up your humidifier) through so that I had a water line beside my fish tank in the loft.

We have not been using the wood stove since I ran this waterline, but since we are going to start using the stove I thought I would get opinions regarding having this water line in the same framed area as the wood stove pipe.

I think the water line runs through the holes in the metal spacers that keep the wood stove pipe away from the walls and framing.

Is this a really bad idea? I know it might seem obvious that this is a bad idea but I also think the space between the water line and the stove pipe would mean there is not enough heat build up to melt/damage this water line.

I hope all this is clear, it is not easy to describe; I can post pics if that helps. Any input would be appreciated.

Grampa Bud 01-22-2011 03:13 PM

The only part that needs addressing at this point -if the stove was preexisting and it was inspected as code compliant- is the water line. If you had a copper or aluminum or steel line passing through that cavity, no one would notice, but a plastic line? The spacers, as you call them, are thimbles meant to disipate the heat from your wood stove flue to help keep the wood structure of your home from scorching or igniting. The thimbles do sometimes have holes in them, but those are for the passage of air, not electrical wires or combustible tubing. You would be better off moving the water line to another spot outside of the woodstove flue chase.

mibson 01-22-2011 03:43 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Grampa Bud (Post 575671)
The only part that needs addressing at this point -if the stove was preexisting and it was inspected as code compliant- is the water line. If you had a copper or aluminum or steel line passing through that cavity, no one would notice, but a plastic line? The spacers, as you call them, are thimbles meant to disipate the heat from your wood stove flue to help keep the wood structure of your home from scorching or igniting. The thimbles do sometimes have holes in them, but those are for the passage of air, not electrical wires or combustible tubing. You would be better off moving the water line to another spot outside of the woodstove flue chase.

Yes, I figured this would be the way to go. It was inspected with the water line in it but It was not noticed by the inspector. I told him about it and he didnt think it was a good idea to have the water line in there; but he also inspected the stove the first time incorrectly and said it was not to code due to clearance issues. After finding out a fireman built this house 22 years ago I thought it was unlikely the stove was not to code and it turned out the inspector was wrong and my stove was to code.

Regardless I will move the water line.
Thanks.

hvaclover 01-22-2011 10:14 PM

Its the radiant heat that would be your main concern. The radiant heat from the stack will give off ultra violet radiation that can make most plastic tubing turn brittle and leak water.

In the HVAC trade we have access to Ultra violet proof plastic tubing for condensate removal to the outside. Just thought this extra tidbit might be useful to know.


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