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Old 06-14-2012, 10:41 AM   #1
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Radiator Removal


Hey fellas.

I am redoing a bathroom that currently has a small hot water two pipe radiator. I would like to lose this and add infloor electric heat.

I have room under the subfloor between the joists. I was thinking I could just add a coupe of 90s and run a pipe to connect the in/out pipes where the radiator used to sit underneath the subfloor.

Is this feasible? Everything tells me that this would work fine but I wasn't sure if there is a different way to do it.

Thanks

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Old 06-14-2012, 06:04 PM   #2
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Radiator Removal


Yep--you are thinking correctly---if the radiator is no longer needed---replace it with a pipe so the water continues on to the next unit.

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Old 06-14-2012, 06:07 PM   #3
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Radiator Removal


I moved this to HVAC--most likely to get the right answer here.--Mike---
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Old 06-14-2012, 06:34 PM   #4
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Radiator Removal


They make rad's that you can place against the floor. They use a reflective surface to keep the heat going up, instead of out. But usually it is PEX that is used, since it is easier to use, and allows for more and better heat transfer.

When you do this, if you do not already have, you may want to look into zoning, along with a thermostat to control the temp to the bath.
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Old 06-14-2012, 08:07 PM   #5
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Radiator Removal


http://www.warmboard.com/warmboard-explained

You could go this way. Just be advised that you don't just slap it in and think it will work properly. If you can do the calculations and set up for the boiler, it's unparalleled comfort. Or you could install it in the ceiling, nice heat that way too
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Old 06-15-2012, 11:08 AM   #6
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Radiator Removal


Check first and see if your radiators are series-piped or parallel-piped. What you are thinking about is the correct fix for a series piped system (IE where each radiator is piped in a chain to one another) Some homes have parallel-wired radiators (most of these are steam, not hot-water) In this system, you will find two pipes under the floor. One is a "hot" supply pipe from the boiler, and the other is the "cold" pipe returning to the boiler. Radiators are connected between the supply pipe and the return pipe, and there's typically a valve on the radiator so the system can be balanced easier. If you were to by-pass the radiator with a pipe in this system, you will be putting hot water directly back into the return pipe. If you have this system, I suggest just capping off the supply and return "T"'s to the radiator and turning the valve off.
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Old 06-15-2012, 11:38 AM   #7
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Radiator Removal


Thanks guys.

At first I was considering just capping each line since if you shut off the angle valve you are essentially doing the same thing....I presume.

But then I was concerned in case it was in series that I would need a continuous "circuit."

I will have to look into that.

Thanks again.

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