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Old 09-02-2013, 01:15 PM   #1
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radiant heat in new construction


I'm at the point of considering how to heat my 18'X18' 2-story addition. I currently have oil-fired hot water heat, and had been thinking baseboard or cast iron radiator. the rest of the house uses radiators (mostly smaller salvaged units I've installed during the remodel) and its really nice since they stay warm and keep rooms comfortable. but for the new addition Im thinking about radiant heat since I already have the hot water. Since its all new construction i have all the options open to me. the first floor of the addition will have a bathroom, laundry room and entry hall/mud room. I'm considering tile for all three which seems a natural for radiant heat. second floor will be a bedroom only. plan was sub-floor and carpet. I hate to add the height with the tubing added above the subfloor, and can install from below -- but does this make sense? is it less efficient from below? and while tile above on the first floor seems ideal for heat transfer what about the carpeting planned for the second? Im going to consult with an expert but at this poit I'd like to have a working knowledge and a POV on best approach. thanks in advance as always! jp

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Old 09-02-2013, 02:54 PM   #2
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radiant heat in new construction


You'll need to insulate the ceiling between the second and first floor.

The carpet will diminish how much heat you get. But you can install a small rad as a second stage heat to offset it on those real cold nights.

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Old 09-03-2013, 08:01 AM   #3
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radiant heat in new construction


sorry I'm up north in bergen county NJ! and I was afraid of that with carpet. same thing with hardwood over a subfloor? and why insulate the second floor -- so the heat rises?
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Old 09-03-2013, 03:37 PM   #4
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radiant heat in new construction


Radiant heat will follow the path of least resistance. Placement of insulation makes sure that the energy goes to the space you want it to go.

You do realize (?) that in most cases you can't use the same water temperatures for radiant that you do for the radiators and will need some means of your heating system to provide different temps. Also, different floor temps and installation types will required different temperatures of water.
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Old 09-03-2013, 04:55 PM   #5
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radiant heat in new construction


Most hard wood floors will transfer heat better then carpet does.
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Old 09-03-2013, 05:09 PM   #6
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radiant heat in new construction


Other than for sound deadening I'm not seeing the reasoning for any type of insulation between the two levels. Why wouldn't you want the warm air on the lower level ceiling to warm the floor on the upper level?
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Old 09-03-2013, 05:26 PM   #7
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radiant heat in new construction


You insulate between the pex and the first floor ceiling so the heat from the pex only heats the second floor. If you don't, then it heats the first floor also. And since 40% of the heat from the pex is going to the first floor, your second floor doesn't heat right.
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Old 09-03-2013, 06:38 PM   #8
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radiant heat in new construction


From what I've observed of in floor radiant I believe I'd be coming out of my down filled mummy sleeping bag in that upper level gasping for a breath of fresh cool air. As mentioned,I sure hope one level can be isolated from the other.
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Old 09-04-2013, 08:02 AM   #9
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radiant heat in new construction


thanks for the input gentlemen! sounds a little more tricky than I first thought but form what I've read it seems to be worth it -- particularly with a first floor thats basically tiled (bath/laundry/mudroom) over a closed crawlspace -- I suspect it would otherwise always be cold to the touch during winter months. I had suspected that the temp might be an issue but assume there are controls that can do this still using the existing hot water system?
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Old 09-04-2013, 12:44 PM   #10
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radiant heat in new construction


Quote:
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I had suspected that the temp might be an issue but assume there are controls that can do this still using the existing hot water system?
Yes is the simple answer. How it would need to be done on your specific system is the detailed answer. With any heating system, how well it functions as far as comfort and efficiency is always in the details.
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Old 10-17-2013, 08:45 PM   #11
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radiant heat in new construction


Quote:
Originally Posted by yellowkid View Post
I'm at the point of considering how to heat my 18'X18' 2-story addition. I currently have oil-fired hot water heat, and had been thinking baseboard or cast iron radiator. the rest of the house uses radiators (mostly smaller salvaged units I've installed during the remodel) and its really nice since they stay warm and keep rooms comfortable. but for the new addition Im thinking about radiant heat since I already have the hot water. Since its all new construction i have all the options open to me. the first floor of the addition will have a bathroom, laundry room and entry hall/mud room. I'm considering tile for all three which seems a natural for radiant heat. second floor will be a bedroom only. plan was sub-floor and carpet. I hate to add the height with the tubing added above the subfloor, and can install from below -- but does this make sense? is it less efficient from below? and while tile above on the first floor seems ideal for heat transfer what about the carpeting planned for the second? Im going to consult with an expert but at this poit I'd like to have a working knowledge and a POV on best approach. thanks in advance as always! jp
Are you set on hydronic radiant heat? Electric radiant heat would not raise your subfloor as much as the hydronic, since it's only 1/8" compared to the tubes for hydronic at almost 1/2". Check out the comparison at http://www.heattechproducts.com/hydr...-floor-heating to see the difference between the two.

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