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Old 12-25-2009, 01:59 PM   #1
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portable propane heater


I have a 10'X12' shed on blocks in the yard; walls and ceiling insulated. How safe are the portable propane heaters specifically Little Buddy and next larger in an enclosed space? Only intend to use it occasionally. Shed is workshop for woodwork and carving. Thanks, Mitch

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Old 12-25-2009, 02:24 PM   #2
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if you have a fireplace take a small handful of sawdust and toss it on the fire. please stand back as the instant fireball is fast and kinda explosive. propane flame plus sawdust = whoosh

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Old 12-25-2009, 02:34 PM   #3
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I use a kerosene torpedo heater in my shed, do wood working, never had a problem. Yes sawdust is flammable and common sense always needs to come into play. I have enough fresh air intake so carbon monoxide is not a problem. The little buddies have a co2 sensor built in so that is really not a problem. They are nice little units great for heating ice shacks.
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Old 12-25-2009, 02:40 PM   #4
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I guess having worked in small shops i notice the dust suspended in the air. maybe a small exhaust fan is all thats neede to poull dust away
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Old 01-04-2010, 06:46 AM   #5
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portable propane heater


For carving with knives and chisels you ought to be OK.

For carving with power tools, sanding, and cutting with tables saws probably not.

You could turn the thing on an hour before you wanted to use the room to warm it up, and then turn it off when you want to start making the explosive powder (sawdust).

As far as other safety issues, Little Buddy heaters (and similar) have an oxygen sensor, so they'll turn off before you die from lack of O2, but I don't think they have a carbon monoxide sensor.

I use one in my camper, but it's a popup camper so it has plenty of ways for air to get in.
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Old 01-04-2010, 06:50 AM   #6
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