Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > HVAC

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 09-06-2008, 06:25 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 15
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Overflow pan in attic


I am having trouble and need some help. The overflow drain leaking into the overflow pan. It is more than a drip and much less than a running faucet. Nevertheless it is constant. I have recently moved into this house and had noticed this a few weeks back. I have made sure the main drane and overflow drain are clear. There was no p-trap installed, pic 9. I have installed the p-trap, pic 10 and its still leaking. What should i look at next as far as troubleshooting??
Its a Trane XL80
Attached Thumbnails
Overflow pan in attic-photos-006.jpg   Overflow pan in attic-photos-009.jpg  

danstar25 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2008, 07:28 PM   #2
Member
 
biggles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Long Island
Posts: 3,630
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Overflow pan in attic


cut the one going into the pan and CAP ITthat pan is for the unit condensate back up if it(your new trap) blocks up but then that should be a straight pipe out NO TRAP...to the outside.if it gets water in it and you see water outside draining off (the straight pipe out)the pan is full below the unit!i've seen those exiting from the attics just over kitchen windows or down to the side of the house porch mostly used areas in home so it can alarm you.the pan on a neww insall should be under the entire cooling side of the attic unit either hung or actually placed inside the pan but the water should never sit when it leaks out when the line you added the trap on blocks up...on a humid day that unit can bang out gallons of water and water running over your kitchen window on a 85F day will test how fast you can hit the attic.the reason you would't trap the EMERGENCY PAN is it isn't working agaist the fan (pressure or negative)..just open attic atmoshere and runs free.the new installed pans would have a 3/4" welded FM adapter to take your PVC run out to the outside

biggles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2008, 07:39 PM   #3
Member
 
biggles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Long Island
Posts: 3,630
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Overflow pan in attic


try this video if it plays just relize he means the evaporator not the condenser when he is running you thru a correct install from what you have ..... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=24S7S...eature=related
biggles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-06-2008, 10:01 PM   #4
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,796
Rewards Points: 1,018
Default

Overflow pan in attic


Quote:
Originally Posted by danstar25 View Post
I am having trouble and need some help. The overflow drain leaking into the overflow pan. It is more than a drip and much less than a running faucet. Nevertheless it is constant. I have recently moved into this house and had noticed this a few weeks back. I have made sure the main drane and overflow drain are clear. There was no p-trap installed, pic 9. I have installed the p-trap, pic 10 and its still leaking. What should i look at next as far as troubleshooting??
Its a Trane XL80
I think you overdid it with the P-trap. The height of the P doesn't need to be that long.

Also, you could install a T at the P and leave it open to allow the fan to pull in air instead of the water back.
handy man88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2008, 09:32 AM   #5
Member
 
1610 CUB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Keokuk,Iowa
Posts: 209
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Overflow pan in attic


If I were to do it I would move your trap into the confines of the catch pan. I would just stick (no glue) the trap into the unit (so its easier to clean later) Make sure its tight. I would also install a liquid level switch in the drain (catch) pan like this
http://www.grainger.com/Grainger/items/2XC13 wire it so it kills the A/C if it gets to full. Then after I moved the trap I would replace the last 90 in the trap with a 'T' That way if the pipe plugs up the water wont back up into the unit. I hope I've helped Now is the time to get a new catch pan built before it rots through!
1610 CUB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2008, 09:42 AM   #6
oops, did I do that!
 
Join Date: May 2008
Location: mid michigan
Posts: 290
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Overflow pan in attic


Where does the drain on the right end, and is it trapped there? Biggles is right, the overflow should not be trapped, neighther should the pan drain. 1610 is calso giving good advise about the pan sensor, its cheap insurance.

Last edited by 8 Ball; 09-07-2008 at 09:47 AM.
8 Ball is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-07-2008, 10:55 AM   #7
Member
 
biggles's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Long Island
Posts: 3,630
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Overflow pan in attic


i forgot to mention that is one condensate pan inside the unit with 2 3/4 female connections .....overkill
biggles is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-09-2008, 11:00 PM   #8
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Texas
Posts: 15
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Overflow pan in attic


Thanks, I have fixed the problem. I had tried just about every variation of all your suggestions but none had worked. Here is what I found. I removed the 2 fittings leading into the air handler and I removed the side. Looked behind the fittings inside the unit and there was rusted metal and orange rust gunk. It took me an hour to fish out and vaccum out. Put itall back together, cut off the p-trap in the overflow drain, capped it, lowered and shortened the p-trap on the main drane. Has been running 2 days now with no problems.
Thanks
danstar25 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2008, 09:39 AM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: Upstate New York
Posts: 368
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Overflow pan in attic


Good going with the P trap - it is critical you have one, otherwise you will draw air up the drain and into the air stream. The standing column of water in the P trap is designed to stop the air flow. Yes, you probably only need one drain depending on whether the unit is mounted vertical or horizontal. Making it easy to disassemble is nice for future cleaning - which you now have discovered is needed regularly.

Last edited by dac122; 09-10-2008 at 09:41 AM.
dac122 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2008, 09:42 AM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,796
Rewards Points: 1,018
Default

Overflow pan in attic


Quote:
Originally Posted by dac122 View Post
You now know you need to periodically clean your coil catch pan as junk will invariable collect there despite good filters, etc.

Good going with the P trap - it is critical you have one, otherwise you will draw air up the drain and into the air stream. The standing column of water in the P trap is designed to stop the air flow. Yes, you probably only need one drain depending on whether the unit is mounted vertical or horizontal. Making it easy to disassemble is nice for future cleaning.
Hold it.

Do people recommend securing the P-trap and other joints with cement or just hand tighten?

Why do some joints have T's to prevent drawback even if there's a P-trap?
handy man88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-10-2008, 11:40 AM   #11
Member
 
1610 CUB's Avatar
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Keokuk,Iowa
Posts: 209
Rewards Points: 150
Default

Overflow pan in attic


Quote:
Originally Posted by handy man88 View Post
Hold it.

Do people recommend securing the P-trap and other joints with cement or just hand tighten?

Why do some joints have T's to prevent drawback even if there's a P-trap?
Leave a way to clean out the trap and or the drain pipe. Use unions . the tee is in the line on the down hill side of the trap its needed to act as a 'stand pipe' so the trap will drain. What happens the air handler is running it wants to suck air in preventing the condensate from exiting. The trap stops that.
If you remove the left hand drain for a minute you should see that from the factory the connection is blocked off 1/2 way up thats why you don't need a trap there.(but I don't it will hurt anything
1610 CUB is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2008, 04:31 AM   #12
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 7
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Overflow pan in attic


Almost everyone mis-understands the A/C Condensate Trap. Its purpose is two-fold. 1.) it forms a liquid seal. This prevents air pressure (positive or negative) generated from the blower fan from escaping into the drain pipe.
2.) it keeps dirt (and contaminents such as lint, dust, pet dander and mold) from coating the entire drain line; although the trap must be cleaned & serviced at least yearly. Furthermore, most Codes require it. It must also be level. Most installations I've run across are either missing the trap or it's installed incorrectly.
DRFREON is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2008, 07:58 AM   #13
Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Posts: 1,796
Rewards Points: 1,018
Default

Overflow pan in attic


Quote:
Originally Posted by DRFREON View Post
Almost everyone mis-understands the A/C Condensate Trap. Its purpose is two-fold. 1.) it forms a liquid seal. This prevents air pressure (positive or negative) generated from the blower fan from escaping into the drain pipe.
2.) it keeps dirt (and contaminents such as lint, dust, pet dander and mold) from coating the entire drain line; although the trap must be cleaned & serviced at least yearly. Furthermore, most Codes require it. It must also be level. Most installations I've run across are either missing the trap or it's installed incorrectly.
How is the p-trap cleaned without pushing the contaminants further down the drain?

There's a company that actually sells p-traps made of clear pvc. I'm surprised it's not more popular, and Home Depot doesn't even sell p-traps that allow easy cleaning.
handy man88 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-16-2008, 03:42 PM   #14
Newbie
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Posts: 7
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Overflow pan in attic


With the use of medium duty Alkaline-poly soap such as Cal-clean. It is also biodegradeable.

Jim M.

DRFREON is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Raccoons in the attic electricpete Pest Control 17 05-12-2011 04:02 AM
Attic fan in Attic access door kubotaart HVAC 10 09-17-2008 12:55 PM
Attic Smell from A/C - I'm at wit's end! cidsamuth HVAC 17 09-06-2008 12:59 PM
Attic Insulation Quote...what do you think? mitchel Roofing/Siding 15 08-06-2008 07:10 AM
Powered Attic Fan question spup345 Roofing/Siding 9 06-30-2008 08:10 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.