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Old 02-24-2009, 07:06 AM   #1
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New Heat Pump Considerations.


OK I live in a 16x80 single wide that currently has an outdoor AC unit and an indoor electric furnace.

In the Summer with the AC running full bore all day and night our electric rarely go over 150-170

In the winter that dang electric heat kills us pushing the bills to their highest point of 306 yesterday when I got the bill.

So I have a few questions:

Does a Package Heat Pump system still need a coil inside? If not can I remove the old electric furnace, plug the hole in the floor and re situate the ducting to connect under the house, and convert the old furnace space into a closet?

If I go with a split system what are the advantages and disadvantages of this type of system. The only thing I can think of is I will still have the old heat as a back up if stuff goes south.

My home is 16x80 witch converts to 1280sf, I have seen several times that a good rule of thumb is 400sf per ton so a 3.5ton system should do the trick. yes/no

I live in North East Tennessee so summer temps range 85to95 high humidity. Winters are usually mild but we do see temps as low as 10f at night for several days in a row.

Giving the construction of a mobile home in the summer if the outside temp hits 70 it will easily get to 80 85 inside, so would a larger unit be needed.

What are some rough average costs installed ready to run?

I am sure I will have more questions but this is a good start.

Thanks
Chip

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Old 02-24-2009, 07:29 AM   #2
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New Heat Pump Considerations.


What is the size of your current A/C?

If you over size. You could end up having to set the thermostat to 66 to make it feel like its 70 in the house because over sized A/Cs tend not to remove enough humidity.

With a split system. You may only need to change your outdoor unit. And not have to have a lot of electrical work redone.

Yes, you can use a packaged unit.

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Old 02-24-2009, 07:56 AM   #3
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New Heat Pump Considerations.


I would still need to buy the inside coil to put in the furnace cabinet with a split system correct.

I am not certain of the size of the current AC it is old and the dataplate is unreadable.
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Old 02-24-2009, 08:03 AM   #4
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New Heat Pump Considerations.


My first thought would be, if you have the indoor real estate for a new air handler (if needed because of newer efficiency compatibility issues) I would go the split route and not try to change a duct system that we assume was designed and balanced for the floor plan.

You are in east TN and that is prime heat pump territory. Lots of 30-45 degree winter nights that will ultimately lower your utility bill as compared to your current AC unit. And if you have only the most common of insulation factors, I think 3 Ton is plenty for your neck of the woods.

If you are considering trying to utilize your current elec furnace and add a new outdoor HP, let us know the make, model and age of your existing indoor unit, as it may not (probably won't) be compatible.

Good Luck
Jay
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Old 02-24-2009, 08:17 AM   #5
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New Heat Pump Considerations.


Coleman Evcon Model eb15a Manufactured in 94
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Old 02-24-2009, 08:26 AM   #6
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New Heat Pump Considerations.


Quote:
Originally Posted by chipperi View Post
Coleman Evcon Model eb15a Manufactured in 94
Won't be compatible with current efficiencies. I still stick to replacing the split system. The cost is not much different then a package unit and you won't have any ductwork to change. Be Leary of the duct static issues that come with manufactured housing. You need to make sure that whatever blower you use is within a reasonable range of your current unit. You will have the same issue with a package unit as well.

Your biggest obstacle will be whether you have enough room to replace your indoor air handler. Without going back to a skinny evcon or similar, you are looking at needing at minimum, 17.5" of width for a modular air handler and matching evap coil.

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Old 02-24-2009, 08:39 AM   #7
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New Heat Pump Considerations.


Just took some pics... It says there is a kit for it. There is currently no coil in it, just a furnace.


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