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Old 02-01-2013, 01:46 PM   #1
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new combustion analyzer


Hey I have a new combustion analyzer I am going to play with. what numbers should I see? I have checked the manual but cant find what is expected.

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Old 02-01-2013, 04:37 PM   #2
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new combustion analyzer


Nat gas and propane.

O2 from 5 to 8%
CO under 100 PPM
CO Air Free under 400 PPM
Stack temp, 80% furnace boiler 350 to 475. Condensing 115 to 130.
CO2( calculated by most CAs) higher then your O2

Go to Bacharach's website and down load their chart. I believe Testo has a vid or 2 on youtube on how to test.

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Old 02-01-2013, 05:55 PM   #3
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new combustion analyzer


120*f condensing for furnaces
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Old 02-01-2013, 06:10 PM   #4
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new combustion analyzer


NOTE: There is a curve on the O2 scale ...i.e., maximum, before you start making CO, is 9% O2..With some boilers/furnaces if you do not have enough air for combustion the reading can go to 8% and you can be producing CO however, your analyser will show excess CO..doesn\t happen very often but, you should be aware of the possibility.
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Old 02-02-2013, 06:57 AM   #5
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new combustion analyzer


Your numbers should also be stable. Increasing CO and decreasing O2 over the course of 10-15 minutes is telling you the appliance isn't venting right or there's a combustion air issue.
NCI has a very good course on CO and combustion analysis that will show you how to use that analyzer for performance and diagnostics and teaches how to correct any problems found. I took it in November and learned a ton. It's expensive($815 for 3 full days of class) but well worth the money IMO,my bosses too. He was impressed enough with the results that he paid me back for the class,paid wages for class time and had me teach the other guys in the shop.
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Old 02-02-2013, 07:13 AM   #6
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new combustion analyzer


Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty S. View Post
Your numbers should also be stable. Increasing CO and decreasing O2 over the course of 10-15 minutes is telling you the appliance isn't venting right or there's a combustion air issue.
NCI has a very good course on CO and combustion analysis that will show you how to use that analyzer for performance and diagnostics and teaches how to correct any problems found. I took it in November and learned a ton. It's expensive($815 for 3 full days of class) but well worth the money IMO,my bosses too. He was impressed enough with the results that he paid me back for the class,paid wages for class time and had me teach the other guys in the shop.
Are they still teaching to use temp compensation for the supply air temp to determine BTU output.
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Old 02-02-2013, 08:16 AM   #7
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They did not. Used the same temp rise and cfm formula that's been standard practice forever.
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Old 02-02-2013, 08:24 AM   #8
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They did not. Used the same temp rise and cfm formula that's been standard practice forever.
They use to. It was pointed out to Jim D. on another site that it was flawed to do so. And was one of the reasons that he never got above 88% efficiency from his calculations on condensing furnaces or boilers.

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