Forums | Home Repair | Home Improvement | Painting | Interior Decorating | Remodeling | Landscaping


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > HVAC

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 03-08-2013, 08:54 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 26
Share |
Default

Need Advice


I bought a foreclosure that will be my house hopefully for a long time. One of the many issues I have yet to deal with is that the gas line started leaking. Obviously, it is turned off but at some point I need to repair it. My dilemma is that I am not sure if I should run a whole new line or go with just a repair. At some point I am thinking that I want to get a modern system(higher psi) and I don't think the old galvanized pipes will handle it...I think there will just be a lot of leaks. I am also worried that a repair will just cause issues down at another junction.


Any advice? I was thinking copper might be good. I really don't understand how they fix the old pipe because of the threading on both sides....you have to unscrew one way but it makes it tighter on the other side. Copper, I would think, would be easy to replace if a section needed had an issue.
01grander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-08-2013, 09:23 PM   #2
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 24,462
Default

Need Advice


#1 Gas lines should never be galvinized pipe.
#2 A Black iron pipe inside a home should never go bad or rust out.

Post a picture of these pipes.
No DIY should be working on gas lines anyway. Only a real licenced plumber with an added gas licence.
joecaption is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 01:35 AM   #3
REP
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 615
Default

Need Advice


The only time copper is allowed is on propane and even then I wouldn't use it.Black iron pipe is strong and will last a lifetime.Galv pipe tends to flake inside and eventually it gets to pilot and burner orfices and plug up.
To get the old galv pipe out,start at the end and unscrew back to the meter.If the gas is shut off at the meter which it should be ,then you could saw at any point with a hack saw but if there is gas trapped in the line you don't want any sparks.If the old line goes to a water heater or stove,there shoulsd be a union to unscrew to get you started.Good luck
REP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 03:47 AM   #4
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 23,446
Default

Need Advice


Get rid of all of the galv pipe. You can run your new line is CSST. It must be sized properly.
beenthere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 06:06 AM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: PENNSYLVANIA
Posts: 2,138
Default

Need Advice


If your line comes into a basement you should get an idea where all the gas appliances are now and what is required gas pipe size, and what the main should be.

Disconnect the Glav at the meter and install a new main line through the basement with tees and caps where the appliances takeoff from the main.
In addition I would install a couple other tees and caps at a couple places on the main in case you want to add or move an appliance at a later date. All black screw pipe with the gas companies blessing. I wouldn't do anything with out a visit from the gas Company.
__________________
No Warranty Means- If it breaks in half you get to keep both halves.
COLDIRON is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 08:32 AM   #6
Roofmaster
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,406
Default

Need Advice


First of all, are you talking about gas lines, water, or compressed air????

Secondly, Yes gas lines are installed from a starting point, and screwed together sequentially from the point where they originate to the appliance they serve. There should be a union near all appliances to allow disconnect.

Third, and I am sure all the old timers are going to yell here. Galvanized pipe can be used for gas if your local codes allow it. Of course your local code official will usually not know why, he/ she will just say because that's the way its always been, or because that's the code.

About a million years ago, there was a concern that the agent that they used to give gas its distinctive odor would cause the zinc to slough off the surface of zinc coated (Galvanized) pipe. After extensive testing it was found that this did not occur, but the legend, and the ignorance concerning it stuck.

There was probably some concern for identification back when galvanized pipe was used for water supply. My dads house has copper supplies, and it was built in 1948, so the use of galvanized pipes for water supply probably stopped just after WWII.

Any way, the legend continues, in spite of erroneous information.

I still hear people using the designation CDX (The X meant Exterior Glue) for plywood sheathing, although plywood has not been laminated with interior glue since at least the 60's. The correct designation is CD exposure 1 meaning a C face veneer, a D back veneer, and exposure 1 designating its resistance to delamination in the presence of moisture.

Exposure 1 is pretty darn good, as the test consists of boiling a 6 x 6 inch section for four days. If it doesn't come apart, it passes.

In the meantime, those of you who are worried about having galvanized pipe supplying gas to your appliances are suffering from unwarranted stress.
__________________
" A lot of men build things, and a lot of things fall down "

jagans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 09:46 AM   #7
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 23,446
Default

Need Advice


There are areas that forbid it in their local code. Some areas require it in their local code.

Since the OP probably doesn't have a 4 wheel cutter, to cut out a section, and then a hand threader to thread the pipe that is still up at the joist. So remove it all, and rerun it in CSST. Saves lots of time.
beenthere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 10:48 AM   #8
Roofmaster
 
Join Date: Oct 2012
Location: Maryland
Posts: 3,406
Default

Need Advice


Rep, please post a picture of a piece of galvanized pipe that has flaked off inside, because I have never seen this happen, or are you just saying this because you heard it somewhere?
__________________
" A lot of men build things, and a lot of things fall down "

jagans is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 12:13 PM   #9
Experienced HVAC Tech
 
HVAC1000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Northern Colorado
Posts: 357
Default

Need Advice


CSST is great and easy to do but to buy it you have to have a certification or at least a company you work for has to. also if you use it you will end up spending about 3 or 4 times as much
HVAC1000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-09-2013, 01:25 PM   #10
REP
Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2011
Posts: 615
Default

Need Advice


Quote:
Originally Posted by jagans View Post
Rep, please post a picture of a piece of galvanized pipe that has flaked off inside, because I have never seen this happen, or are you just saying this because you heard it somewhere?
I was told that at my city's basic gas class given by the local utility.This was not a small town it was a large city.I never questioned that info.
As for using it for water I have replaced galv water line and you couldn't see through a 6" nipple it was pluged solid.How any water got through that is something I can only wonder about.
REP is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2013, 10:28 AM   #11
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 26
Default

Need Advice


Thanks for all the replies. I haven't been around my computer this weekend so I haven't been able to respond.

My house is from 1924 so it has a lot of things that are outdated. It definitely has galvanized pipe which I want to replace with something that will last for the next 30 years at least.

My main concern is the threading and if there is a gas leak again. I've been told that the threading makes it to where if you tighen on one side then the other side is becoming looser.

Isn't csst just for going from the t to the appliance? Or are they using that for the entire line now?
01grander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2013, 10:51 AM   #12
Hvac Pro
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Winnipeg, Canada
Posts: 8,325
Default

Need Advice


Galvanized ALWAYS was/is a hard joint to seal and I did lots of it in a hospital and with high pressure water etc. Steel pipe is the norm and replacing a gas line is NOT a DIY project as you need to be a licensed gas fitter and know the codes and take out a permit etc. Best to get one to replace the whole line from the meter down to all the appliances.
__________________
"Cut it twice and it is still too short".
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
yuri is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2013, 01:20 PM   #13
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 26
Default

Need Advice


So copper is not used with gas?

I wasn't planning on doing it myself but I liked to be informed before I talk to someone. I've hired a few people and they did not do the work correctly. I'd like to be able to talk to them to the extent they know I can check what they are doing.
01grander is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2013, 02:42 PM   #14
Hvac Pro
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Winnipeg, Canada
Posts: 8,325
Default

Need Advice


copper is very expensive and usually only used for small jobs and outside like to hook up BBQs (running from a main line inside). It is easy to puncture and therefore usually used for BBQs and to hook up fireplaces and small jobs. there is this CSST corrugated stainless steel tubing coated with yellow nylon which is a continuos length of pipe but is quite expensive/the fittings etc but for some contractors and in some cases saves $$ on labor, is quicker and easier to install so they may recommend that. does not require all the labor and pipe threading machinery etc so I would be OK if they recommend that. again not a DIY material.
__________________
"Cut it twice and it is still too short".
To view links or images in signatures your post count must be 10 or greater. You currently have 0 posts.
yuri is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-11-2013, 02:56 PM   #15
Member
 
raylo32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Maryland (DC 'burbs)
Posts: 1,022
Default

Need Advice


Not sure where you live but hereabouts (Maryland) houses are built with continuous copper interior gas lines. Each run (from meter to inside manifold and individual line to each appliance) is a continuous piece with no concealed unions or joints. All connections are flare fittings. Not sure where that would fall on the cost continuum but probably more than steel but less than CSST? Probably less labor cost if they could access the joist chases and such to fish it through. You might check to see if that is an option in your locality.
__________________
Live long and prosper.
raylo32 is online now   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Advice is not always correct! Docwhitley Plumbing 9 02-14-2011 09:12 PM
Chain link fence install advice ponch37300 Landscaping & Lawn Care 1 11-10-2010 06:08 PM
Drywall ceiling: Water Damage, looking for advice dawho1 Building & Construction 11 09-13-2010 10:05 AM
looking for Serious advice and Help on Insulation bfan781 Building & Construction 6 05-19-2010 11:02 AM
Electrical Advice Caution!!! Mike Swearingen Electrical 12 03-05-2008 11:51 AM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.