Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > HVAC

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 08-10-2010, 11:28 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Question

Moving warm air with an inline fan.


Hello,

I am new to this forum and was wondering if anyone had advice on my project.

I have a wood stove in the kitchen in my house and I would like to move the warm air from the kitchen to the master bedroom which is about a 65 foot duct run with one 90 degree turn.

My idea was to use an inline fan such as a Vortex fan with an 8" duct installed in the attic space with ceiling registers to move the air.

My questions are:

1. What size fan would efficiently & quietly do the job?
2. Is 8" duct large enough or to small?
3. Should the fan "pull" the air or "push" the air? or be located in the middle of the run.
4. If I want to split the run to other rooms should I use a plenum or "Y's"


These are my questions at this time. If anyone can help it will be greatly appreciated.

Thanks everyone,
Steve.

gopherkiller100 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2010, 06:29 AM   #2
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 23
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Moving warm air with an inline fan.


My sugestion, Run an 8" run at least 40', build a plenum and branch off the plenum with 4" duct to feed each room. Install two (at plenum) 4" booster fans to pull air to the room you want heat. Intall 120V t-stats to each fan to controll off and on in each space. Important make sure you are just moving heated space not Carbon Monoxide.

lamon2524 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-01-2010, 05:25 PM   #3
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 25,527
Rewards Points: 2,734
Default

Moving warm air with an inline fan.


65'. Long run.

Use atleast a 10" duct from the kitchen. If the fan is capable of more then 300 CFM, 8" will be too loud, and also reduce the fans ability.

I'd probably Wye off the 10" to the bedrooms.
beenthere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2010, 12:28 AM   #4
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Moving warm air with an inline fan.


Thanks guy's.

This is a project that I would like to complete before this winter. I am researching any information that I can find.

I like the idea of a larger duct as the fan I am leaning towards is a "Fantech" CF1410. It is an 8" inline fan that produces 408 CFM @ ) 0" static pressure. 173 CFM @ 1.0" static pressure.

It has a variable speed 115V motor which I plan to connect to a controller in the hallway.

Any thoughts on pulling the air or pushing the air??

Thanks everyone,

Steve.
gopherkiller100 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2010, 02:46 AM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 23
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Moving warm air with an inline fan.


Quote:
Originally Posted by gopherkiller100 View Post
Thanks guy's.

This is a project that I would like to complete before this winter. I am researching any information that I can find.

I like the idea of a larger duct as the fan I am leaning towards is a "Fantech" CF1410. It is an 8" inline fan that produces 408 CFM @ ) 0" static pressure. 173 CFM @ 1.0" static pressure.

It has a variable speed 115V motor which I plan to connect to a controller in the hallway.

Any thoughts on pulling the air or pushing the air??

Thanks everyone,

Steve.
Answer your own question! Why would you push airflow back? You are already pushing air from the outside or insinde fan, to be non jugmental. Push and Pull mean the same thing 1 direction. Direct the airflow to what ever the room needs more CFM's. Sure to to get a a reply from Beenthere/Knowitall. Good luck could solve your problem in 1 hour.
lamon2524 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-02-2010, 05:03 AM   #6
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 25,527
Rewards Points: 2,734
Default

Moving warm air with an inline fan.


Quote:
Originally Posted by lamon2524 View Post
Answer your own question! Why would you push airflow back? You are already pushing air from the outside or insinde fan, to be non jugmental. Push and Pull mean the same thing 1 direction. Direct the airflow to what ever the room needs more CFM's. Sure to to get a a reply from Beenthere/Knowitall. Good luck could solve your problem in 1 hour.

LOL...

An 8" flex duct, would have a minimum of .4" static moving 400 CFM.
A 10" flex duct would be .18".

You need to decide how much air you want to move.

A 6" flex, will have minimum of .1" static at 75 CFM.

You can use a 10" duct, and 2 10 X8 reducers if you want to install your fan in the middle of the 10" run.


A friction rate chart, only shows how much pressure you will lose. Not how much pressure is in the duct. Many are confused on this.

So how much air do you want to move, and at what static can your fan move that amount of air.

For the record. A 4" flex duct can move 32 CFM at roughly .12" static.

beenthere is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Moving an 8x10 wooden shed 100 miles; how? (Video of shed inside) snowfall General DIY Discussions 32 10-23-2012 08:54 PM
Dimmer switch is warm even when lights are off! gonzo Electrical 17 05-25-2010 07:10 AM
Moving Warm Air To Basement? GearHd6 HVAC 6 11-23-2008 07:55 PM
moving warm air kt49809 HVAC 1 11-23-2008 02:55 PM
my tile floor is warm minahanna Plumbing 8 01-23-2006 06:04 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.