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Old 05-05-2010, 07:30 PM   #1
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License for HVAC work?


I often see ads in the local newspaper for "Maintenance man for apartment complex, must be proficient in HVAC repair". So just to find out about this, I call about one job and was told that YES I would, at times, have to re-charge air conditioning units with freon. When I told the lady that, as far as I know in our municipality, and the State, you have to have an HVAC license to do this. She told me that you do not need a license if you work for them, they are exempt. I do not believe this. And how do they get away with this? All of the guys I know in the HVAC business have to be licensed and go courses to keep up with the rules on Freon removal/installation. Any ideas here? Thanks, David

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Old 05-06-2010, 06:43 AM   #2
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No license required.

Must be EPA section 608 certified though(it is NOT a license).

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Old 05-06-2010, 04:54 PM   #3
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Nationally you need certified for working with refrigerant but many states have nothing for the heating side.
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Old 12-22-2015, 06:07 AM   #4
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The HVAC certification is legally required to become a technician, it is widely recognized in the field and validates a technician's knowledge.
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Old 12-22-2015, 07:29 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by tk03 View Post
Nationally you need certified for working with refrigerant but many states have nothing for the heating side.
It depends on the refrigerant. In the USA you need an epa card to work with r22, but not r410a

In Canada you need to be certified to work with just about all ozone depleting or green house gas refrigerants (including R410a)
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Old 12-22-2015, 08:31 AM   #6
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As previously stated, in the US, you need a EPA 608, to handle most refrigerants. What that place is probably doing is what I've seen many maintenance shops do around me.

They have one guy that holds a EPA cert and they purchase all their refrigerant under that person. They then let anyone with a gauge set handle it. It's not legal when handling most refrigerants, but they do it.
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Old 12-22-2015, 09:52 AM   #7
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Hope the guy made his decision on the job by now.
USA needs a 608 card to purchase certain refrigerants. This does not mean you know what your doing. And the EPA class doesn't tech you about theory. I've worked on a lot of units that people have grossly overcharged, because they got a card and nothing else.
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Old 12-22-2015, 10:58 AM   #8
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Old thread walking.... Lol
In the great white north, there's a bunch of licensing. Each province does their own thing, but generally you need separate licenses to work with gas systems, oil systems, liquid side of LP, refrigeration systems, most electrical, most plumbing, along with just about anything else. A certificate just to buy and handle just about any refrigerant other then water. Starting run out of pages in my binder to hold them all. It's a real PITA.... DIYers here really have a hard time here.

Cheers!
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Old 12-22-2015, 11:23 AM   #9
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Quote:
Originally Posted by supers05
Old thread walking.... Lol In the great white north, there's a bunch of licensing. Each province does their own thing, but generally you need separate licenses to work with gas systems, oil systems, liquid side of LP, refrigeration systems, most electrical, most plumbing, along with just about anything else. A certificate just to buy and handle just about any refrigerant other then water. Starting run out of pages in my binder to hold them all. It's a real PITA.... DIYers here really have a hard time here. Cheers!
Sheet metal is also a compulsory trade, meaning you have to be either a journeyman or an apprentice. Of course, there is no enforcement, so....
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Old 12-22-2015, 11:43 AM   #10
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Originally Posted by crabjoe View Post
As previously stated, in the US, you need a EPA 608, to handle most refrigerants.
Quote:
Is EPA technician certification required to service R-410A systems?
No, at this time EPA technician certification (i.e., EPA Section 608 certification) is not required in order to service R-410A systems or other stationary refrigeration and air conditioning systems containing HFCs.
http://www3.epa.gov/ozone/title6/pha...ctors_faq.html
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Old 12-22-2015, 11:45 AM   #11
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Old thread walking.... Lol
Hah!
Funny . Just noticed.
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Old 12-22-2015, 12:23 PM   #12
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Already knew that... That's why I said most. You don't need it to handle R134a either... Still, regardless of refrigerant, you're still suppose to follow EPA rules when it comes to handling .. such as recovery because even HFCs are now considered a greenhouse gas.

Around my neck of the woods, you can't locally purchase even R410a without a EPA cert .... because the only places that carry it is at the local supply houses and they won't sell any refrigerant to anyone that doesn't have one. Not law, but that's what they do...

I think there is a way for non-EPA cert holders to purchase even R22 legally. I think all they have to do is state that they are purchasing it for a cert holder or it's for resale. That gets the seller off the hook.
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Old 12-22-2015, 02:53 PM   #13
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Originally Posted by crabjoe View Post
Already knew that... That's why I said most. You don't need it to handle R134a either... Still, regardless of refrigerant, you're still suppose to follow EPA rules when it comes to handling .. such as recovery because even HFCs are now considered a greenhouse gas.

Around my neck of the woods, you can't locally purchase even R410a without a EPA cert .... because the only places that carry it is at the local supply houses and they won't sell any refrigerant to anyone that doesn't have one. Not law, but that's what they do...

I think there is a way for non-EPA cert holders to purchase even R22 legally. I think all they have to do is state that they are purchasing it for a cert holder or it's for resale. That gets the seller off the hook.
If its stated to be for resell, then you need your # to give to who you are buying it from. If your buying it for a certified person, then you need that guys #.

All retail sales are suppose to be recorded. Its a bigger fine doing it the way you suggest, then just buying it. Plus, the IRS can get involved.

You really want to screw with 2 gov agencies? Specially when the one can take everything you own.
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Old 12-22-2015, 04:05 PM   #14
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Originally Posted by crabjoe View Post
Around my neck of the woods, you can't locally purchase even R410a without a EPA cert .... because the only places that carry it is at the local supply houses and they won't sell any refrigerant to anyone that doesn't have one. Not law, but that's what they do...

.
You can buy 410a on line anywhere in the USA and have it shipped right to your door. You don't need to bother with the locals.

Here in Canada you can't purchase any refrigerant without a card (except for hydrocarbon base) and you can't buy disposable bottles (or "topoff" bottles). All refrigerants sold must be in (large) refillable containers. Interestingly enough though there is still no law against importing disposable bottles from the USA..... loop hole I guess.
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Old 12-22-2015, 04:56 PM   #15
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Originally Posted by crabjoe View Post
...because even HFCs are now considered a greenhouse gas...
That is because R410A has a GWP, or Global Warming Potential of 1725. This is compared to CO2, which = 1.

CO2 systems are becoming much more popular for this reason. No ODP and smaller GWP issues. It's also non flammable and doesn't break down to form toxic fumes in extreme heat, like some HFCs and CFCs.


Cheers!

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