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-   -   Lennox furnace ignitor switch(?) (http://www.diychatroom.com/f17/lennox-furnace-ignitor-switch-37015/)

TotallyConfused 01-28-2009 12:45 AM

Lennox furnace ignitor switch(?)
 
I have a Lennox gas furnace. I don't know what model it is though. It is not heating the house at all. Everything is switched over to heat, but when the furnace kicks on the fan thing seems to be working, but it is just blowing cold air. A friend of mine had the same problem a few years ago and said it sounded like the ignitor switch that needs to be replaced. So I was going to remove that part to get a number off it, so I could order the part, but I am having no luck. I didn't know if this sounded like that might be the problem or what. Please help!
TotallyConfused:(

ccarlisle 01-28-2009 08:15 AM

Why do people think they are good at diagnostics when it comes to heating with gas???Do you all realise what your insurance company would say if something went wrong? Hint: "You're SOL if you did it yourself"...!

What value does a $150 service call really have to your safety?

TotallyConfused is a case in point...no idea what has gone wrong, asks a friend, thinks it's the same part but not sure, then asks for help here?:furious:

And what technical responsibility do we have? :whistling2:

Pick up the phone and the YP...that's my advice. Be confused at what cereal you'll have this morning - but don't be here.:no:

TotallyConfused 01-28-2009 09:23 PM

I got on here for help because I thought that is what I was doing. I hardly have money for my bills. So I surely do not have 150 for a service call. For them to tell me to buy a name brand part for a couple more hundred. I really don't appreciate the reply. If that is all you had to say, you should just say nothing. How is anyone supposed to learn, if questions are not asked. Would you rather me ask you the question and act like a dumb blond? If you have a problem with someone trying to DIY then maybe you should be on a different site. I would rather you not even reply to this, if you are just going to complain. Thanks and I hope you have a BEAUTIFUL DAY!!!!!:thumbup:

JohnH1 01-28-2009 09:47 PM

Are you somewhat firmiliar with your unit. Do you know if it has hot surfice ignition, spark ignition or is it a older model with a standing pilot. Also if it is a draft indused unit the 1st thing that will happen on a call for heat is the induser will start. Does this happen?

cobracdn 01-29-2009 08:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ccarlisle (Post 220531)
Why do people think they are good at diagnostics when it comes to heating with gas???Do you all realise what your insurance company would say if something went wrong? Hint: "You're SOL if you did it yourself"...!

What value does a $150 service call really have to your safety?

TotallyConfused is a case in point...no idea what has gone wrong, asks a friend, thinks it's the same part but not sure, then asks for help here?:furious:

And what technical responsibility do we have? :whistling2:

Pick up the phone and the YP...that's my advice. Be confused at what cereal you'll have this morning - but don't be here.:no:


If he knew it all he would not be asking. And with all due respect, your obviously not an insurance agent. You'd be surprised what they will cover when there is no professional to sue. I find it hypocritical to call him out on ignorance on one thing wile you display ignorance in another.

With that said, it can be serious playing around with gas appliances. Do you have the original manual for the unit? A lot of them have a troubleshooting table that is relatively easy to follow. If you don't try : http://www.lennox.com/owners/manuals.asp

Cheers

yuri 01-29-2009 02:23 PM

Post the model and serial#. It is inside the unit by the burners on the left side.

cobracdn 01-29-2009 03:00 PM

:) You folks still in the deepfreeze there Yuri?

Cheers

yuri 01-29-2009 05:26 PM

Been up and down like a toilet seat. Was 0 deg C last week with -30 before that. -20 today -6 tomorrow etc etc. Frost heaving is hard on the roads and water pipes. Great White North. No mosquitoes though.:2guns:

Cheers

frankie3s 01-29-2009 07:02 PM

A big problem on many forums is not only the lack of basic knowledge (which is OK as long as people are open to learn), but that many people create a thread about a problem and don't mention important pieces of information such as the furnace make and at least the model number.

Nothing worse than, "Hey my furnace is not working...couldn't be bothered to look at the decal to see who makes it or to get the model #, can someone tell me the part number for the piece that I need to replace." This is what most techs (which I am not) hate and totally feel insulted over and I for one understand that.

On a side note, after reading a ton of threads I was able to understand my furnace better and in the end, changed the Honeywell gas control valve on my furnace which totally fixed my problem in the end.

ccarlisle 01-30-2009 08:58 AM

....an insurance aspect
 
"And with all due respect, your (sic) obviously not an insurance agent."

:laughing:

No I'm not - but I work with them. Are you an insurance expert? :no: From your posts, I seriously doubt it.

Many homeowners don't realize the legal problems they can run into by not having a professional inspect their heating system on a regular basis, especially on a gas system - and I'd go as far to say that especially so in countries where (a) a gas is more common (b) the legal system is on steroids (c) where 'dumbing-down' of the homeowner a common practice and (d) where "saving" one dollar has become a national sport.


If a fire, or worse, is caused by the furnace and there are no records of the furnace having been properly maintained, the insurance carrier can - and may - deny the claim for damages. And I don't know any damage that could be considered "cheap"...I work in the damage restoration field and have seen damage after a fire and the homeowner with no help from their homeowners insurance policy. Not a pretty sight.

It is relevant to this forum to have this information and especially relevant to homeowners before they consider repairing furnaces themselves. I have no kick against people trying to find out what's going on with their system, what may have gone wrong and how to fix it. But to go beyond that and suggest a homeowner fix it themselves is a step I don't want to take without covering my you-know-what really well.

Here we had a homeowner unable to diagnose the dozens of problems that could be wrong with her gas system, asked a friend for her diagnosis and hoped that - by asking the experts here - she could save $150 on a service call and fix it herself.

So, what, if she has a sore stomach does she take her neighbour's medicine because she has a sore stomach too?

"Well, her doctor told her to take Tums, so I guess I will too. Besides why should I pay a doctor $150 to give me a $2.99 bottle of Tums..."

The analogy is a bit simplistic, OK.

But that's my view on this thread. And this is not a knock on the dozens of professionals who donate their time and expertise to help out the confused homeowner. I respect these people. But many of them might agree with this maintenance issue.
:yes:

cobracdn 01-30-2009 02:46 PM

Quote:

No I'm not - but I work with them. Are you an insurance expert? :no: From your posts, I seriously doubt it.
No I'm a contractor, over 20 years experience, & I work with our local Firechief. My wife is an insurance agent and yes she is licensed.

Your insurance company does not disallow claims on the basis that you are uniformed or ignorant of maintenance schedules or procedures. They also will not disallow a claim if the homeowner themselves attempt repair. Unless the HO was specifically negligent in their actions, or was found to be untruthful in the content of their statement of claim, they will in fact be covered provided an adequate policy was in place and in good standing prior to the incident to which the claim is being made. However if the HO is (in this case), a trained tech in regards to the furnace, and has successfully fulfilled the credentials required to be certified or ticketed, then the claim could indeed be disallowed providing an investigation has revealed negligence or a mistake that his training should have made the incident avoidable.

I strongly suspect in this case that he is not qualified.

In a nutshell, there is no law against stupidity.

Cheers

JohnH1 01-30-2009 04:38 PM

Re: In a nutshell, there is no law against stupidity.

Great that means I am covered. I feel much better now. (Ha Ha)

yuri 01-30-2009 05:34 PM

Stupidity can be deadly. One of our previous posters had a stupid roofer cover his chimney and gas him. People need to have a VERY HEALTHY respect for what gas can do if improperly handled. Getting simplistic answers on the internet from who knows who (some wannabee pros who glean info from surfing) and believing it to be true can be deadly also. The real pro's try to save lives and provide safe info by trying to determine a persons skillset before giving out info. If they feel uncomfortable with that they don't give out the info or try steer the poster in a SAFER direction which unfortunately costs $$ and goes against the DIY at all cost mentality.

Be safe and not sorry:thumbup:

JohnH1 01-30-2009 05:38 PM

I have ran into the roofer issue several times. Some think the chimney is ther personal garbage chute. Tar buckets, Lunches, pieces of brooms. Always check the draft.

yuri 01-30-2009 05:44 PM

Yuck.:drink: They usually use the return air duct for that on new home construction. Coffee cups, half eaten ham sandwich etc. LOL


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