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johnsorious 06-26-2013 06:35 PM

Installing wood stove
 
In the house I just bought there was a wood stove previously installed. I just purchased a new stove and will install it whenever I have free time. How would I hook it up? I took a look down my chimney when I was on the roof installing a bathroom exhaust fan. The roof is seperated in half and their is a metal duct coming up for the boiler and the other half is for the wood stove that was previously installed. Would I have to install pipe in that other half of the chimney for the wood stove?

Daniel Holzman 06-26-2013 06:41 PM

You would need to check with your building inspector as to local regulations. In my town, when I installed my wood stove, I needed to install a stainless steel liner in the half of my flue to be used by the stove. And I needed a permit. Failure to obtain said permit from the town could have resulted in serious trouble with my insurance company, who required proof that the installation met town standards, else they would have dropped my coverage.

joecaption 06-26-2013 07:50 PM

What's the website of the company that made the stove say is needed?

johnsorious 06-26-2013 10:03 PM

I have this wood stove. http://www.homedepot.com/p/Englander...5#.UcudSPksm1s

oh'mike 06-27-2013 12:07 AM

I looked at the specs---you need a fresh air intake--6"

and a 6" flue----have you checked out how you will get a fresh air intake to the unit?

What is your flue size? To large is as bad as to small--a fireplace flue is often to large for a stove---sounds like you need to talk to the manufacturer---My heating supplier has an engineer on staff that gets me the information---Mike----

johnsorious 06-28-2013 05:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by oh'mike
I looked at the specs---you need a fresh air intake--6"

and a 6" flue----have you checked out how you will get a fresh air intake to the unit?

What is your flue size? To large is as bad as to small--a fireplace flue is often to large for a stove---sounds like you need to talk to the manufacturer---My heating supplier has an engineer on staff that gets me the information---Mike----

I have no clue what a flue is. And I have to have a fresh air intake that's 6" in diameter?

Is there a good website that gives all the basics of installing a wood stove? I don't know anything about them

johnsorious 07-01-2013 03:57 PM

2 Attachment(s)
My chimney is split into two halves just like this. It's 5"x5". Can I just hook up my wood stove vent to this? This was where the old one was installed in the family room

FClef 07-01-2013 04:36 PM

The ancient adage of R. T. M. applies here. (Read The Manual)

It gives you the minimum sizing of the flue (your chimney whether it be lined with terracotta or stainless steel) and how to properly install it. They also suggest a stainless steel liner, but if your current flue is approved then you can use it as long as it is in good shape.

Combustion air intake is only required on mobile home applications but suggested for other applications. I would take the suggestion and add it, but you don't have to. It is always best to get your combustion air from outside the home because if you are replacing windows, insulating, caulking up all the gaps and cracks, you can potentially starve your fuel burning appliances for air. This can cause serious and potentially dangerous conditions. You can do what you want but I know what I would do.

Here is the link to the manual. http://www.englanderstoves.com/manuals/13-NC.pdf

My caveat for the manual is that on the manufacturers site they do not have your model listed and only give the model 13-NC which says it covers all of that product line post-2004. Your manual MAY be different so be sure to read it before you install anything.

johnsorious 07-03-2013 07:56 PM

Is the air line required? My wood stove is located in such an awkward place that I don't know where to put it without making it look bad. There was a previous stove installed and I plan to reuse that hole in the chimney for the flue.

jmon 07-03-2013 10:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by johnsorious (Post 1211205)
Is the air line required? My wood stove is located in such an awkward place that I don't know where to put it without making it look bad. There was a previous stove installed and I plan to reuse that hole in the chimney for the flue.

Short answer: Yes. However, that's going to be totally up to you. The manufacturer is very specific in the manual, and your insurance company may require it as well.

Scroll down and read pages 11, 12 and 13 in your manual, it states, that an outside air intake is required in mobile home or basement installations. Additionally, it's reccommended for all home installations, especially if your home is airtight. Without a fresh air intake, it will use the air in your house to burn. This may cause the flame to burn sluggish and have a constant smell of smoke in your house.

Your stove has a 3 inch outside air intake located on the back of the stove for this purpose. IMO, and with the interest of safety in mind, I would try and find a way to get fresh air to your stove somehow.

All the above members have made great points and given you sound advice. Let us know if we can be of further assistance to you. Thanks.

click here for manual

johnsorious 07-03-2013 11:24 PM

I only ask this because my chimney is almost in the center of my house. I don't know how to run the fresh air intake without making it look bad. I want my wood stove installation looking as clean as possible. I'll draw out a floor plan tomorrow.

johnsorious 07-04-2013 10:01 AM

1 Attachment(s)
Here is a diagram of the lower level of my house. It's a ranch style home. The red arrow is where the previous wood stove was installed that was taken out by the renovator. I plan I putting my new stove in the same spot since the hole is cut out in the chimney for it. My chimney is split in two. It's roughly split into two 6"x6" squares. The blue box is where my hwbb is installed. As I said before my chimney is separated in two so the wood stove and hwbb exhaust won't interferre with each other. A photo of what it looks like was previously posted. Any ideas of where to install the air intake? I'm trying to keep the setup look nice.

Also would I have to run pipe in my chimney for the exhaust since my chimney is already 6"?

Daniel Holzman 07-04-2013 10:12 AM

You would need to install a liner in the chimney flue if one or more of these factors applies:

1) The chimney is not rated for wood stove combustion gases
2) Your local jurisdiction requires a liner
3) Your insurance company requires a liner
4) The wood stove manufacturer requires a lined flue

I have a two flue chimney, similar to yours. My local jurisdiction required a stainless steel liner as part of their permit and inspection process. You might want to check with your local jurisdiction. As I have pointed out, installation without a permit may have negative effects on your home insurance policy.

jmon 07-04-2013 11:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by johnsorious (Post 1211432)
Here is a diagram of the lower level of my house. It's a ranch style home. The red arrow is where the previous wood stove was installed that was taken out by the renovator. I plan I putting my new stove in the same spot since the hole is cut out in the chimney for it. My chimney is split in two. It's roughly split into two 6"x6" squares. The blue box is where my hwbb is installed. As I said before my chimney is separated in two so the wood stove and hwbb exhaust won't interferre with each other. A photo of what it looks like was previously posted. Any ideas of where to install the air intake? I'm trying to keep the setup look nice.

Also would I have to run pipe in my chimney for the exhaust since my chimney is already 6"?

John, in your drawing, it's too bad your boiler room wasn't in a basement it would make it easier with a very low profile. However, is it possible to go through the wall where your stove will be sitting without interferring with your chimney draft. Your 3 inch air intake is located on back bottom of stove and there will be a very small portion of pipe showing in your living area. Just an idea, is it possible to get it through the wall somehow, and run it through your boiler room (up high so you won't run into it) to that outside wall without it looking like something from outerspace? The pipe would be a little smaller than your exhaust for dryer. The instruction sheet for the air intake kit says it should be as close to the stove with the least amount of run as possible. See instructions for kit.

I see what your up against. It's a tough one. I agree, you may not be able to do it without it looking like something from mars. Is your home air tight? (new home, new windows, all sealed up, etc.) Stay tuned, let's see if someone else can come up with some more ideas for you.

click here for AC-OAK3 air intake kit instructions

johnsorious 07-04-2013 12:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jmon

John, in your drawing, it's too bad your boiler room wasn't in a basement it would make it easier with a very low profile. However, is it possible to go through the wall where your stove will be sitting without interferring with your chimney draft. Your 3 inch air intake is located on back bottom of stove and there will be a very small portion of pipe showing in your living area. Just an idea, is it possible to get it through the wall somehow, and run it through your boiler room (up high so you won't run into it) to that outside wall without it looking like something from outerspace? The pipe would be a little smaller than your exhaust for dryer. The instruction sheet for the air intake kit says it should be as close to the stove with the least amount of run as possible. See instructions for kit.

I see what your up against. It's a tough one. I agree, you may not be able to do it without it looking like something from mars. Is your home air tight? (new home, new windows, all sealed up, etc.) Stay tuned, let's see if someone else can come up with some more ideas for you.

click here for AC-OAK3 air intake kit instructions

My home isn't air tight I guess because everything except the boiler is original back to 1969. Hopefully someone will have a good idea where to run my air line.


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