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Old 04-10-2013, 08:42 PM   #61
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Humidity question


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how do you post pictures on here?
If you upload it to a hosting service. You can click on insert image at the top of he posting window(what we type in). And insert the link to it.

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Old 04-10-2013, 09:27 PM   #62
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If you upload it to a hosting service. You can click on insert image at the top of he posting window(what we type in). And insert the link to it.
Ok, so my chimney gas insert even though its a direct vent it still relies on natural draft for the venting? I guess I keep confusing all direct venting with fan assisted venting but I have seen direct vent fireplaces that vent horizontally so those have to be fan assisted. I noticed a tank water heater that had a power vent but from I saw it was not direct vent. It had a small draft assembly with a cover on it to take in air from the room. Do you think these have heat exchangers in them or do only tankless have heat exchangers?
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Old 04-10-2013, 09:35 PM   #63
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Your insert uses the liner as a natural chimney.

Yes, a horizontal would have a fan for exhaust.

That water heater was either a direct vent, or a power vent unit.

All water heaters have a heat exchanger. The tank will have a passage way for the combusted gas to travel through and give up its heat to the water. The water heater tank is part of the heat exchanger.
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Old 04-10-2013, 10:04 PM   #64
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Your insert uses the liner as a natural chimney.

Yes, a horizontal would have a fan for exhaust.

That water heater was either a direct vent, or a power vent unit.

All water heaters have a heat exchanger. The tank will have a passage way for the combusted gas to travel through and give up its heat to the water. The water heater tank is part of the heat exchanger.
Mine is a natural draft water heater. By heat exchanger I mean like the metal or steel type in a furnace. I know tankless ones have them so they can product constant hot water.
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Old 04-11-2013, 04:48 AM   #65
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Mine is a natural draft water heater. By heat exchanger I mean like the metal or steel type in a furnace. I know tankless ones have them so they can product constant hot water.

Tankless boilers and water heaters all use coils for their heat transfer. Hot air furnaces don't have a heat exchanger like it due to the blower energy it would require to force air through them.
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Old 04-11-2013, 07:55 PM   #66
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Tankless boilers and water heaters all use coils for their heat transfer. Hot air furnaces don't have a heat exchanger like it due to the blower energy it would require to force air through them.
When you have a metal chimney chase that runs in the attic your supposed to put down some flashing on the attic floor around the opening then seal it and keep insulation away. What does the metal flashing serve as? Is it a moisture and air seal? Also, are you supposed to insulate the actual chase to prevent heat loss and condensation in summer when its not used?
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Old 04-11-2013, 08:01 PM   #67
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The metal flashing is to act as a thimble. Its to support the chimney.
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Old 04-11-2013, 09:37 PM   #68
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The metal flashing is to act as a thimble. Its to support the chimney.
isn't it to keep a distance between the chase and combustibles? Also, did you get my question about the insulation?
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Old 04-12-2013, 04:06 AM   #69
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isn't it to keep a distance between the chase and combustibles? Also, did you get my question about the insulation?
Yep, keeps clearance from combustibles also. Insulation is also kept off of it.
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Old 04-12-2013, 09:09 AM   #70
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Yep, keeps clearance from combustibles also. Insulation is also kept off of it.
So the actual chase itself from the attic floor to roof. The round pipe you do not insulate at all?
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Old 04-12-2013, 03:02 PM   #71
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No need to insulate it. Unless its a very long run from the attic floor/joist to the roof.
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Old 04-12-2013, 03:51 PM   #72
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No need to insulate it. Unless its a very long run from the attic floor/joist to the roof.
What about the heat from the chase and cool air in winter. Wouldn't that cause possible condensation?
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Old 04-12-2013, 05:53 PM   #73
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What about the heat from the chase and cool air in winter. Wouldn't that cause possible condensation?

Condensation where? In the chase, no. On the outside of the chase, no.

Lack of heat(temps below the dew point) is what causes condensation.
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Old 04-12-2013, 09:04 PM   #74
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Condensation where? In the chase, no. On the outside of the chase, no.

Lack of heat(temps below the dew point) is what causes condensation.
When you have the cold attic air and the heat from the chase? Cold always drifts towards warm.
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Old 04-13-2013, 05:46 AM   #75
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Insulation doesn't prevent the something from getting cold/loosing heat. it only slows down the process.

Most chimney liners are not insulated, as it does more harm then good. Since the cold insulation prevents the liner from getting warm as fast.

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