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-   -   Humidistat manual settings question (http://www.diychatroom.com/f17/humidistat-manual-settings-question-92053/)

detyianni 01-11-2011 10:19 PM

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I did see another post on this but I still need some help. I feel like it may be too dry in the house. Attached is a pic. Say its 20 out what should this knob be set at? Im confused because from what it says the higher the temp out the higher the humidity? It should be opposite right?

Also in the months where we don't use heat do I just turn it to off?

I'm in michigan by the way

Thanks

Marty S. 01-12-2011 05:49 AM

The reason the humidity goes lower as it gets colder out is to avoid damage to the home. Moist air will condense inside the walls and on windows.

In the summer just turn to off and close any damper on the humidifier. If you forget to turn it off it's no big deal since the dial will be on 35-40 and the humidity in the house will be higher then that anyway.

detyianni 01-12-2011 08:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Marty S. (Post 568316)
The reason the humidity goes lower as it gets colder out is to avoid damage to the home. Moist air will condense inside the walls and on windows.

In the summer just turn to off and close any damper on the humidifier. If you forget to turn it off it's no big deal since the dial will be on 35-40 and the humidity in the house will be higher then that anyway.


Thanks for the reply, I did some googling and learned that now.. first house so im learning alot on here...

..its a colonial house and I noticed a little condensation on the lower window panes just in the master bedroom on the main floor... about an inch.. there is no condensation on any other windows in the house.. the windows are about 15 years old.. could it just be the windows? if the setting is too high would it be more obvious in all the windows?

Thanks!

veesubotee 01-12-2011 09:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by detyianni (Post 568387)
Thanks for the reply, I did some googling and learned that now.. first house so im learning alot on here...

..its a colonial house and I noticed a little condensation on the lower window panes just in the master bedroom on the main floor... about an inch.. there is no condensation on any other windows in the house.. the windows are about 15 years old.. could it just be the windows? if the setting is too high would it be more obvious in all the windows?

Thanks!

Is there an ajoining shower/bath? Do you notice the condensation mostly after showers?

Seems strange that problem is only in 1 location. Exhaust fan? How's it working?

V

detyianni 01-12-2011 11:21 AM

hmmm that could be it, yes there is a master bath... usually the blinds are closed i wiped all the condensation off this morning before i left for work, and yeah i took a shower..so maybe thats all it is... there is one exaust fan... its a high celing ..i run it ..maybe i need to get up there and clean it up...

I thought about getting a stonger fan, but i dont want to have to make any changes besides swapping it out.. can you do that? are there standard sizes?

diyorpay 01-12-2011 01:12 PM

I will just mention this basic idea. No matter how cold or hot it is outside, the bath window must/should be at least cracked half an inch so that the fan can do it's job. It needs cross ventilation. Best opened before start of a shower. Next best when finished a shower. I have mine on a mechanical, spring loaded timer switch and we set it for half an hour after a shower.

hvaclover 01-12-2011 08:48 PM

Fellow Mi here.

U R right---if the blades are caked with dirt no air will move.

If you "feel" like it may be too dry you should first make sure of your humidity level. This can be done with a five dollar Humidity measuring gauge (a hygrometer as we call them in the hvac biz) at your local hardware store.

The normal range is 35 to 45% Relative Humidifier but there are some who accept 50% as the top end.

If you find your home with in this range you are ok.

i have installed countless humidifiers in my career and I have found that the cold air duct mount humidity control location is the worst location for accurate humidity control of the whole home.

The reason is the un-uniform air flow thru the cold air duct makes it next to impossible to sense the true amount of moisture in the returning air.

The best place to mount the humidity control is next to the thermostat. It senses a majority of the air at that location and keeps the home more uniformly humidified.

There is a compromise used to compensate the location of the humidity control.

Your window moisture could be normal in this cold weather we have today.
If it's 10 or 20*F outside your widow can get cold enough to condense the natural humidity out of your inside air even if you didn't have a humidifier.
This is true for most homes built in the last 25 years and newer.

It is 20*F right now as I type this, and the bottom of all my bathroom windows are wet. The cold surface of the bathroom window is sucking the moisture out of the air put there by the toilet water and the sink as we use it.
my other windows are fine.

Hope this helps.

detyianni 01-12-2011 09:30 PM

Thanks this helps alot...plus a new pad for the humidifier is on the way in the mail maybe that should help too

Mr Dodge 01-12-2011 09:49 PM

Well Dang HVAC, I just installed an Aprilaire 500 on my heat pump and you gotta mount the humidistat upstream, CA return was really the only option per provided instructions. I've noticed the solenoid open at every call for heat, thought that was strange, but it generally shuts right back off after a couple mins. Your thoughts on optimal placement?

Never mind, just read your edited post. Can't do that here the supplied controller picks up on the rear.


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