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Old 10-10-2008, 07:08 PM   #1
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How do I know if the boiler is big enough to service my addition?


I have a V83 series burnham boiler that's about four years old. I am adding an addition to the house that would bring the size of the house to around 3000 square feet. I am not sure if the boiler I have will be large enough to service the added space.

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Old 10-10-2008, 08:35 PM   #2
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How do I know if the boiler is big enough to service my addition?


Find out how many BTU's the furnace is good for. Calculate the total cubic feet (not square feet) of the area you want to heat. Divide the total cubic feet into the BTU's of the furnace.

If you are lower than 5 then you might consider a bigger furnace. If you are above 5 then you are golden.

You didn't mention where you live and that is a factor in your heating. If your climate is temperate then you could get by with a smaller furnace, if you are in a colder climate then a slightly larger furnace might be worth buying.

I have used this figure for years and it has worked so far. Deciding what size furnace is more of an art than science.

There are so many factors that determine the size of a furnace and I have listed them in previous posts.

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Old 10-10-2008, 09:06 PM   #3
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How do I know if the boiler is big enough to service my addition?


Thank you for the quick response Marvin Gardens. I'll post how it worked out.
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Old 10-10-2008, 09:21 PM   #4
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How do I know if the boiler is big enough to service my addition?


What marvin suggest is ok , but the only way you'll find out for sure is to do a Manual J heat load calculation.

There are many things to consider in sizing a piece of equipment. Exposure to wind, degree days , infiltration of air, window quality, height of ceiling, R value of walls and ceiling insulation.

Rule of thumb is has to much fudge factor built into it so in many cases you end up going over the right btu rating,

Do a google search on LOAD CALCULATION and visit the sites. There is one site where they will give you overkill info on load calcs, but I don't think I am allowed to post the link.

Sorry Marv. Just a difference of opinion on sizing.
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Old 10-10-2008, 11:13 PM   #5
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How do I know if the boiler is big enough to service my addition?


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Originally Posted by hvaclover View Post
What marvin suggest is ok , but the only way you'll find out for sure is to do a Manual J heat load calculation.

There are many things to consider in sizing a piece of equipment. Exposure to wind, degree days , infiltration of air, window quality, height of ceiling, R value of walls and ceiling insulation.

Rule of thumb is has to much fudge factor built into it so in many cases you end up going over the right btu rating,

Do a google search on LOAD CALCULATION and visit the sites. There is one site where they will give you overkill info on load calcs, but I don't think I am allowed to post the link.

Sorry Marv. Just a difference of opinion on sizing.
No need to be sorry. There is a lot to sizing a furnace and more input is better than less input.

I appreciate your input.
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Old 10-10-2008, 11:23 PM   #6
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How do I know if the boiler is big enough to service my addition?


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Originally Posted by hvaclover View Post
There is one site where they will give you overkill info on load calcs, but I don't think I am allowed to post the link.
No problem posting the link, as long as it isn't an advertisement for a user-affiliated site or product. If the link is to beneficial information that is pertinent to the thread, it is just fine to post it.
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Old 10-11-2008, 12:01 AM   #7
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How do I know if the boiler is big enough to service my addition?


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No problem posting the link, as long as it isn't an advertisement for a user-affiliated site or product. If the link is to beneficial information that is pertinent to the thread, it is just fine to post it.
Thanks

HVAC-TALK.COM

Residential section is where to ask about the the Manual J calcs.

Please read the site rules as they are very strict on certain things.

They will be able to point you to a professional Manual J sizing for your addition or point you in the right direction to do one your self.

Good luck.
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Old 10-11-2008, 05:50 AM   #8
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How do I know if the boiler is big enough to service my addition?


A load calc will tell you if the current boiler can handle the load of both the addition and cuurent structure at the same time.

If its border line. Zoning can help it. If you use set back stats and don't need the whole house heated to the same temp 24/7.

The next thing that will hinder that boilers abilities. Is the circulator. It most likely has a Taco 007.(a factory standard with 90% of the boilers) Its GPM is too low for most installations.

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