Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > HVAC

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-07-2012, 01:04 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Question

Help!


My home was built in 1985, we have lived here since mid-2006.
Our air handler is in our attic above our kitchen.

September 14, 2009 the a/c handler started to have leaking problems

July & into November 2011 and water damage has continued thinking its the condensation line having a leak. We picked up a shop vac and suctioned the unit from the outside about every other month. In november it damaged the ceiling with small bowing.

However we felt it was under control with the continued suctioning.

In May 2012 we had a leak again, this time the leak damaged our ceiling moreso than the last time - the ceiling bowed a lot. We sent out Service America who handles (under contract) the a/c handler.

The man took a look at it, couldn't see any water (husband suctioned the water the day before - I explaied this to him.) The tech filled up all of the liquids and said that if the leaking happens again, it could be "dirty coils" which aren't covered in our contract - $680.00 fee claiming that the fees are high due to the handler being in the attic.

The following is covered according to our contract:

Thermostat
Fuses – unit blows a fuse
Compressor
Fan Motor
Blower Assemblies
Starting & Running capacitors
High Low pressure switches
circuit boards
contactors
filter line dryer
heater
relays breaker
transformers
defrost control board




Any annual maintance isn't covered in the contract and coil cleanings are $680.00


Since this is our first home, I have no idea what our next step should be. Husband suctioned the extra water out so there is no more leaking, and the drip pan is at a tilt away from the auto-shut off value...which caused for more leaking.

But what is causing the leak we don't know.
Am I getting taken advantage of? What do you think? Any advice is helpful!

Thank you!

mrsprincesslily is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 01:06 PM   #2
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Posts: 2
Rewards Points: 10
Question

Help!


My home was built in 1985, we have lived here since mid-2006.
Our air handler is in our attic above our kitchen.

September 14, 2009 the a/c handler started to have leaking problems

July & into November 2011 and water damage has continued thinking its the condensation line having a leak. We picked up a shop vac and suctioned the unit from the outside about every other month. In november it damaged the ceiling with small bowing.

However we felt it was under control with the continued suctioning.

In May 2012 we had a leak again, this time the leak damaged our ceiling moreso than the last time - the ceiling bowed a lot. We sent out Service America who handles (under contract) the a/c handler.

The man took a look at it, couldn't see any water (husband suctioned the water the day before - I explaied this to him.) The tech filled up all of the liquids and said that if the leaking happens again, it could be "dirty coils" which aren't covered in our contract - $680.00 fee claiming that the fees are high due to the handler being in the attic.

The following is covered according to our contract:

Thermostat
Fuses unit blows a fuse
Compressor
Fan Motor
Blower Assemblies
Starting & Running capacitors
High Low pressure switches
circuit boards
contactors
filter line dryer
heater
relays breaker
transformers
defrost control board




Any annual maintance isn't covered in the contract and coil cleanings are $680.00


Since this is our first home, I have no idea what our next step should be. Husband suctioned the extra water out so there is no more leaking, and the drip pan is at a tilt away from the auto-shut off value...which caused for more leaking.

But what is causing the leak we don't know.
Am I getting taken advantage of? What do you think? Any advice is helpful!

Thank you! ps. this is a x-post from Home Improvement>HVAC. I am unfamiliar with which board would be frequented more.

mrsprincesslily is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 01:33 PM   #3
I'm Your Huckleberry
 
Join Date: Mar 2011
Posts: 5,876
Rewards Points: 2,204
Default

Help!


Air handlers (electric) need a p-tap on it firstly. Secondly, might be a good idea to drop your home warranty. I did that for two years, I know how the game is played. A dirty coil could be where the dirt is coming from, indeed, as dirt accumulates on the evaporator and drips down through your drain but the issue is the drain itself.

Evaporator coil cleanings, condenser coil cleanings is how the company makes money. Other than that the home warranty company only pays the hvac contractor a set amount so they don't make any money that way. Their job is to sell non covered costs to make money once they're in your home. Again, I know as I've done it for two years. Not anymore, though.

The hvac contractor can have anything, be it by manipulation alone, denied just to be able to make money. The repair is not covered (so the warranty company will not pay for it) and then you have to pay directly to the hvac company, leaving out the service provider altogether. And many times the repair is not the repair that was needed so the problem still exists after you've paid.

Anyways, find a good local hvac company, drop the home warranty. Coil is not the issue, the drain is.
Doc Holliday is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Doc Holliday For This Useful Post:
COLDIRON (12-08-2012)
Old 12-07-2012, 02:02 PM   #4
Member
 
JJboy's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Austin - Texas
Posts: 1,402
Rewards Points: 500
Default

Help!


Flush drain line, install p-trap and flow safety switch at the drain pan and main drain line. BUT first you need to make sure the drain line is unclogged. We use high pressure nitrogen to flush.

Sent from my iPhone using DIY Forum
__________________

**Always kill the power ** Hot air rises, but heat will always move from higher to lower temperatures. ** Real man shoot in manual. ** If it ain't grounded, it ain't dead.
JJboy is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 02:29 PM   #5
Member
 
joed's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Welland, Ontario
Posts: 7,825
Rewards Points: 2,444
Blog Entries: 4
Default

Help!


Are you sure the drain is not clogged. There should be no need to suction it out if it is draining properly.
__________________
Do not PM with questions that can be asked in a forum. I will not respond.
joed is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 02:53 PM   #6
HVAC Tech/Owner
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: VA
Posts: 470
Rewards Points: 264
Default

Help!


Pics of your airhandler would help.
Technow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-07-2012, 03:54 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Hartfield VA
Posts: 26,914
Rewards Points: 2,944
Default

Help!


Sure sounds like the condinsate drain is pluged up happens all the time) or the pan it self is leaking.
I've never heard of a dirty coil causing an issue with leaking.
If the coil was dirty the unit outside would be freezing up from lack of air flow.

PS Service Master would have been the last place I would have called for an HVAC problum.
I'm hoping some of the real HVAC guys will chime in later today. I've cleaned many a coil and no way would I have charged someone that much. Any I've cleaned could be done in less then an hour and a $7.00 can of coil cleaner.
I'm not a HVAC tec, so there opion may be differant because they do it all the time, and there the experts.
joecaption is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2012, 05:58 AM   #8
Mold!! Let's kill it!
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Central Pennsylvania
Posts: 2,849
Rewards Points: 2,012
Default

Help!


She said "Service America", not "Servicemasters". Not that I'm convinced that there is a big difference. A clogged condensate drain is a pretty normal occurance on a residential or even a commercial air handler. It has nothing to do with dirty coils, although allowing dirt to accumulate on the coil from poor filter maintenance, can make the problem worse. An air handler cools, in part by condensing moisture out of the air. That condensed moisture drains away through a pan in the base of the unit. It is normal for these drains to accumulate a slimey growth that can block the drain. Your air handler should sit in a containment pan as a back up, which is also piped to drain. There are products to treat drains on AC units and to prevent the slimey growth. Whether a clogged drain is covered by your service contract, we can't say, but you should not need to suction out anything on a regular basis, unless there is a problem.
Maintenance 6 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2012, 06:35 AM   #9
DIY staff
 
Join Date: Sep 2009
Location: Kane county,Illinois
Posts: 21,843
Rewards Points: 2,334
Default

Help!


Merger your two threads together====
__________________
Cast Your Vote!!
New members: Adding your location to your profile helps in many ways.--M--
oh'mike is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-08-2012, 10:50 AM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Sep 2011
Location: western Ny
Posts: 1,247
Rewards Points: 508
Default

Help!


If the OP comes back....Have you been up in the attic to look at this unit? You may find it is easier to fix than you think. Probably a clogged drain hose.

danpik is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off





Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.