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no1hustler 04-24-2013 08:15 AM

Heat Pump to supplement Oil?
 
We are currently receiving quotes to get an AC Condenser installed at our house. We already have the duct work and the blower as we have forced air oil heat. Some of the options that we are being given include a heat pump. They say that we set it up so it comes on instead of the oil until it gets down to 40 degrees (or whatever we decide). This allegedly reduces the amount of oil we will use in a year. My question is, how much extra electricity does it use instead? Is there a way to see how much of a difference there will be? It is tempting as the heat pump only costs about $350 more but I don't want to find out that it will actually cost us more down the road.

Thoughts?

tylernt 04-24-2013 10:25 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by no1hustler (Post 1166152)
They say that we set it up so it comes on instead of the oil until it gets down to 40 degrees (or whatever we decide).

Only down to 40F degrees is a pretty crummy heat pump. Modern heat pumps should be able to operate down to 20F or even lower.

Quote:

This allegedly reduces the amount of oil we will use in a year. My question is, how much extra electricity does it use instead?
It uses about the same as central A/C.

You may find this comparison spreadsheet useful: www.eia.gov/neic/experts/heatcalc.xls . It can't estimate what your bill will be since the size of your house, insulation, and local weather are variables, but the sheet will let you compare the cost of oil to the cost of an air source heat pump to see if it's cheaper or more expensive based on your oil and electricity prices.

no1hustler 04-24-2013 11:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tylernt (Post 1166241)
Only down to 40F degrees is a pretty crummy heat pump. Modern heat pumps should be able to operate down to 20F or even lower.

It uses about the same as central A/C.

You may find this comparison spreadsheet useful: www.eia.gov/neic/experts/heatcalc.xls . It can't estimate what your bill will be since the size of your house, insulation, and local weather are variables, but the sheet will let you compare the cost of oil to the cost of an air source heat pump to see if it's cheaper or more expensive based on your oil and electricity prices.

The unit priced was a Trane. The person said 40 degrees or whatever you decide on so I don't know if 40 is the limit by any means.

hvactech126 04-24-2013 02:31 PM

The balance point is where you put it at. Most contractors leave it up higher to reduce call backs for complaints of "its blowing cold air". Heat pumps put out no where near the amount of heat that an oil furnace does. Having said that, I would absolutely get a heat pump over a straight a/c in your case.

beenthere 04-24-2013 04:01 PM

The heat pump at about 35 degrees and warmer will cost about 1/3 of what the oil would cost to use to heat your house.


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