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-   -   Heat is on even with no thermostat. (http://www.diychatroom.com/f17/heat-even-no-thermostat-188775/)

RyanD 10-18-2013 09:43 AM

Heat is on even with no thermostat.
 
3 Attachment(s)
We moved in about 5 months ago, in the middle of the summer and I thought it was always too warm in this room but I chalked it up to being summer and the house holding heat. Fast forward to yesterday when it was cold out and I walked downstairs (split level home) and that room is nice and toasty which it shouldn't be since the heat is off down there and it's half way underground. I go over and sure enough the heat is on.:eek: Check the thermostat and feel the pip coming out of the boiler and sure enough it's warm and off. Maybe it's a broken thermostat? I remove it and go to work and when I come home that pipe is till warm while the other three zones are cool to the touch. So, now I'm worried that circulator is bad and when ever there is warm water (our water heater is attached to our boiler too) that water is flowing in there and warming up that room. I thought about trying to kill the power but it appears that added this zone and it's just split off another zone so I'd have to shut off both to test if it's that power box (what's that called?).

So, what should I try? I'd like to have a better idea of what's broken before trying to get it fixed. The boiler is one of the areas I usually don't DIY. Here are some shots, you can see I actually shut the valve for that room so stop it from heating up. Is that okay?

beenthere 10-18-2013 06:17 PM

The boxes are circulator relays.

The flow check valve for that zone may be leaking water through when the boiler is heating the indirect water heater.

The circulator itself is not bad.

Nothing wrong with shutting that valve off.

RyanD 10-18-2013 06:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beenthere (Post 1255142)
The boxes are circulator relays.

The flow check valve for that zone may be leaking water through when the boiler is heating the indirect water heater.

The circulator itself is not bad.

Nothing wrong with shutting that valve off.


What can I do to confirm/fix this? Thanks

beenthere 10-18-2013 06:24 PM

Reopen valve. Wait until boiler runs to reheat the water heater. See if the pipes to that zone get warm then.

RyanD 10-18-2013 10:05 PM

Also, why don't I have zone valves? At my previous house I had this things that stuck off the pipe that the wires ran to, it looks like the wires are running to the circulator or are those the valves they're just big and old?

beenthere 10-18-2013 10:10 PM

Because you have multiple circulators, and flow check valves.

Your zone valve system only had 1 circulator.

RyanD 10-19-2013 03:55 PM

Okay, so I spent some time researching. The pumps "pump" and this releases the valve but normally there isn't enough pressure to open the valve so it stays shut. I did the check and the boiler kicked on for the hot water and the pipe for the heater got fully hot. I read on their website in one of their FAQs (it's a taco brand) that normal operation should be all the way clockwise so I go to check and it's almost all the way counter clockwise. I turned it with a wrench all the way clockwise so now I'll see what happens. What would make them open it up like this? That means the heat was always on even in the summer since the water heater was kicking on.

beenthere 10-19-2013 04:51 PM

The circulator or its relay may have gone out. And as a cheap solution, they just manually opened the valve instead of spending money to fit it.

RyanD 10-19-2013 05:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beenthere (Post 1255463)
The circulator or its relay may have gone out. And as a cheap solution, they just manually opened the valve instead of spending money to fit it.

Yeah, that's what I figured. I wonder how long it was open for, it was a single older women who lived here alone so my guess is that was the quick fix that never actually got fixed so that room was always getting hot even in the summer. :eek:

beenthere 10-19-2013 06:49 PM

May have been done to save her money. And she may not have used that room, so never worried about it getting to warm.

RyanD 10-21-2013 09:25 AM

So with it turn all the way clockwise the heat still went down that zone so should I assume the zone valve is busted? I've done plumbing before (heating, sink, toilet) but never messed with the heating system, is this something I could easily change out?

TheBobmanNH 10-21-2013 09:49 AM

"easily" is definitely a stretch. It's a real pain to drain a system, do the plumbing, and then re-pressurize it correctly. I'm sure everyone here will tell you not to do it, but I say do your due diligence (read read read) and give it a try; worst case you have someone come and fix your mess right? ;)

RyanD 10-21-2013 10:31 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by TheBobmanNH (Post 1256077)
"easily" is definitely a stretch. It's a real pain to drain a system, do the plumbing, and then re-pressurize it correctly. I'm sure everyone here will tell you not to do it, but I say do your due diligence (read read read) and give it a try; worst case you have someone come and fix your mess right? ;)

Yeah, the last time I did it (with no research. :whistling2: ) I had tons of air in the system and had to have some guy out to flush it. That's my biggest concern, not the actual plumbing part. I cant imagine something like this would cost too much but in MA who knows where the unions control everything and prices are ridiculous.

beenthere 10-21-2013 08:13 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RyanD (Post 1256050)
So with it turn all the way clockwise the heat still went down that zone so should I assume the zone valve is busted? I've done plumbing before (heating, sink, toilet) but never messed with the heating system, is this something I could easily change out?


The flow check may be scarred and need replaced. As said earlier, easy is a perspective, and skill set thing. Easy for me, may be difficult for you.

RyanD 11-04-2013 04:03 PM

Got a quote. $388...seems pricey.

1) We shall supply and install a new 3/4" heating system feed check valve.
2) We shall cut out and replace a 1 foot section of corroded heat piping on boiler.
3) We shall purge system and test for proper operation.

So the valve is ~$80, copper is maybe $20 so $288 for labor? Sound about right?


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