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-   -   Goodman central air and heat blowing fuses (http://www.diychatroom.com/f17/goodman-central-air-heat-blowing-fuses-105108/)

DannyR 05-21-2011 09:31 AM

Goodman central air and heat blowing fuses
 
We have 9 month old Goodman unit. In the winter, it would not let us turn it up more than 2 degrees at a time without throwing a breaker. Lived with that as we couldn't get our service man out. Couple of months ago, turned air on and it ran for maybe a week and went out. Service came and put in new thermostat. We have now had 3 new thermostats and the unit is blowing fuses. Some fuses last 2 weeks. Put 2 in yesterday and were blown by this morning. Service man has replaced fuse board and did something to the outside unit. Don't know what else to do. Any ideas?

clocert 05-21-2011 09:41 AM

Need more info to comment. what is the size of your new A/C ? what is the size of the breaker (AMP) ? Did you replace the old A/C with a larger unit ?

Doc Holliday 05-21-2011 09:47 AM

Fuses generally are there to protect against low voltage shorts, to protect the board.

All low control (thermostat) voltage wires need to be physically checked for nicks such as nails in the walls, dogs or rats chewing through them, etc. etc. One or more low voltage wire(s) is touching something, possibly themselves and shorting, blowing fuses.

Low control wires also feed outside to your condenser from the furnace.

hvactech126 05-21-2011 02:57 PM

which fuse are you blowing, low volt on circuit board, outdoor unit high voltage or indoor unit high voltage?

beenthere 05-21-2011 09:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hvactech126 (Post 652118)
which fuse are you blowing, low volt on circuit board, outdoor unit high voltage or indoor unit high voltage?

Same questions.

DannyR 05-25-2011 05:33 PM

It's blowing low volt fuse on circuit board. It trips a 30amp breaker sometimes or just goes straight to the fuse. It's the same size unit. Same ac installer put this one in that put the other one in. We are without air as I am writing and can't get him here.

hvactech126 05-25-2011 08:27 PM

If the fuse is blowing then you have a short in the low voltage thermostat wiring. IF your breaker is tripping that is high voltage and something is really messed up in the a/c

beenthere 05-25-2011 08:27 PM

Could be a short at the defrost board.

DannyR 05-28-2011 09:44 PM

Found out something new today. A friend of ours who does install ac units dropped by and looked it over. The installer came out yesterday, put in a new transformer, and something else that I never understood what he meant. It worked for 22 hours and by this morning it had quit again. Went out to check fuses and low and behold there was no longer a place to put fuses. He evidently changed the fuse board for one that doesn't use fuses so it blew the transformer. We ALSO found out our outdoor unit is a 3 ton HEATPUMP UNIT!!!! This friend said it was a good 400.00 more expensive unit than if it were just an ac. However the heating is conventional. He checked all wires and found a short in the wire from the thermostat to the unit. Our installer said yesterday he had already checked that and even though it was 30 years old, it was still ok. SO, we now know sort of what it needs but getting him out here to perform the warranty work is once again the problem. My next question is, if the outside unit is a heatpump but just being used as an ac, does that make the connections different for a thermostat and does it require a special thermostat different from a conventional ac/heater?

DannyR 05-28-2011 09:45 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Doc Holliday (Post 652006)
Fuses generally are there to protect against low voltage shorts, to protect the board.

All low control (thermostat) voltage wires need to be physically checked for nicks such as nails in the walls, dogs or rats chewing through them, etc. etc. One or more low voltage wire(s) is touching something, possibly themselves and shorting, blowing fuses.

Low control wires also feed outside to your condenser from the furnace.

Doc, read my latest post please.

beenthere 05-28-2011 10:40 PM

A heat pump can be wired to provide heat only.

DannyR 05-29-2011 05:51 PM

My parents have a heat pump that is their air and heat.

DannyR 05-29-2011 05:55 PM

One quick question. If you installed a unit and it's only 9 months old, and the customer has had it down more than up, (you have checked it out and are baffled, can't find the problem, whatever) and you know it's got to be the installation or a bad unit, not the customers fault, would you loan them a portable unit to help them out considering it's 96 degrees and they trusted you with 3250.00 to install a unit that you can't keep running more than one day at a time? (then we can't get him back for 2 weeks)

beenthere 05-29-2011 06:21 PM

Well, 3250 is a basement bargain price, so it doesn't include a loaner unit(not from me atleast).

I would return the next time you called for no A/C or heat, and not make you wait 2 weeks. But then I wouldn't have been that cheap on the unit and installation either. Which allows me time to fix something if it does have a problem. Instead of making you wait until I'm done with paying customer service calls. This is a common problem with low priced contractors, they can't afford a lot of time to repair something under warranty. So it sounds like you got one of those contractors that sells boxes for bargain prices, and doesn't bother to take training on what he sells and installs.


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