Furnace Vent Location - HVAC - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > HVAC

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 06-28-2013, 10:49 PM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 12
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Furnace Vent Location


I recently bought a new 95% efficient furnace. I am looking to find out what the laws in my area stipulate in terms of vent locations. The manual that came with the furnace has some guide lines but the they are not clear. Can someone tell me where I can find this info? Or maybe someone knows? I live in a NYC suburb. Thanks.

Advertisement

stevem447 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2013, 01:59 AM   #2
Experienced HVAC Tech
 
HVAC1000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Northern Colorado
Posts: 357
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Furnace Vent Location


Quote:
Originally Posted by stevem447
I recently bought a new 95% efficient furnace. I am looking to find out what the laws in my area stipulate in terms of vent locations. The manual that came with the furnace has some guide lines but the they are not clear. Can someone tell me where I can find this info? Or maybe someone knows? I live in a NYC suburb. Thanks.
Usually ( this is true in my area, idk about yours) the code actually says to follow manufacturers instructions on all class 2&3 appliance venting. Which includes high efficiency stuff. All requirements should be stated in manufactures booklet. However I agree in that they are often worded in tough to understand ways. You could post sections you don't understand and maybe we can help "translate" them

Advertisement

HVAC1000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2013, 06:41 AM   #3
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 12
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Furnace Vent Location


Quote:
Originally Posted by HVAC1000 View Post
Usually ( this is true in my area, idk about yours) the code actually says to follow manufacturers instructions on all class 2&3 appliance venting. Which includes high efficiency stuff. All requirements should be stated in manufactures booklet. However I agree in that they are often worded in tough to understand ways. You could post sections you don't understand and maybe we can help "translate" them
Below is the URL to the manual, pg. 14 has the chart and layout of a typical home. My furnace is 70k and according to what I see on the chart it needs to be 12" from a door or Window. I n my case I have a permanently closed basement window, so I should be ok correct?

http://www.alpinehomeair.com/related...%2010-2012.pdf

Some additional questions: What is the difference between "Direct Vent" and "Other than Direct Vent"? I am using a standard exterior vent I assume this is direct? http://www.ebay.com/itm/Goodman-Flus...item3a6322e875

Can I run PVC vent pipe behind my furnace? There is a 14" space between the wall and the furnace.

I have a brick exterior on my home, what is the recommended method for creating the penetrations? I plan on using a hammer drill.
stevem447 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2013, 06:55 AM   #4
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 26,410
Rewards Points: 4,472
Default

Furnace Vent Location


The PVC can run behind your furnace. There is no clearance to combustibles for PVC venting.

It also needs to be 12" above normal snow accumulation level.
__________________
When posting in certain forums, knowing your location will help others give better feedback/advice/solutions to your questions.
beenthere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2013, 07:28 AM   #5
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 12
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Furnace Vent Location


Quote:
Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
The PVC can run behind your furnace. There is no clearance to combustibles for PVC venting.

It also needs to be 12" above normal snow accumulation level.
Roger that, I am putting it under an over hang with a gutter attached, that should help to prevent snow buildup.
stevem447 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2013, 07:30 AM   #6
Member
 
raylo32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Maryland (DC 'burbs)
Posts: 1,088
Rewards Points: 588
Default

Furnace Vent Location


I did this myself at my house a couple years ago using the same type of vent. Make sure you look closely at all the clearances in the manual. I believe they all come from the National Fuel Gas Code. On my house there was only one single sidewall location that satisfied all of them. Otherwise I would have had to go up to the roof, which would have been almost impossible and prohibitively $$.

I also had brick in the location of my vent. Instead of drilling them out I broke out the mortar and removed whole and half bricks to make a rectangular opening. Then I inserted a piece of pressure treated 2x6 by lumber cut to fit and glued it in with construction adhesive. Then I drilled that out for the pvc.
__________________
Live long and prosper.
raylo32 is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to raylo32 For This Useful Post:
MTN REMODEL LLC (06-29-2013)
Old 06-29-2013, 08:18 AM   #7
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jul 2012
Posts: 12
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Furnace Vent Location


Quote:
Originally Posted by raylo32 View Post
I did this myself at my house a couple years ago using the same type of vent. Make sure you look closely at all the clearances in the manual. I believe they all come from the National Fuel Gas Code. On my house there was only one single sidewall location that satisfied all of them. Otherwise I would have had to go up to the roof, which would have been almost impossible and prohibitively $$.

I also had brick in the location of my vent. Instead of drilling them out I broke out the mortar and removed whole and half bricks to make a rectangular opening. Then I inserted a piece of pressure treated 2x6 by lumber cut to fit and glued it in with construction adhesive. Then I drilled that out for the pvc.
I read the instructions in the manual, it looks like the diagram says that the specs given are National Standards. I was concerned that there might be local standards as well. According to the manual I need to be 12" above the snow line (where do you determine the official snow line?), and 12" from any Window or door. I have a permanently closed window in the basement I was planning on using the area adjacent to that.


Great Idea with the brick, I do not have good masonry skills however.
stevem447 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2013, 08:34 AM   #8
Member
 
raylo32's Avatar
 
Join Date: Nov 2006
Location: Maryland (DC 'burbs)
Posts: 1,088
Rewards Points: 588
Default

Furnace Vent Location


I'd be really conservative with the snow line especially if it is a place on your house that tends to accumulate drifts.

I am remembering more of my job now... my brick was backed by concrete block so I did use a hammer drill and cold chisel to make the rectangular opening in that. The pressure treated piece is glued into the concrete block.
__________________
Live long and prosper.
raylo32 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2013, 08:37 AM   #9
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2012
Posts: 241
Rewards Points: 200
Default

Furnace Vent Location


When drilling through brick, rent a rotary hammer drill with the size bit you need from home depot. a 2" PVC will use a 2 1/2 " carbine bit. you have to drill from the outside because it will blow out the back of the brick. it makes a real nice opening and then all you do is use a little caulk around it. one of these drills cost about a thousand bucks with each large drill about 100. it will slice thru like butter. I had a house that had the red foundation brick on the inside and regular brick on the outside. it was 12" thick. it cut thru that in about 90 seconds with a perfect round hole.
hvac instructor is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2013, 09:05 AM   #10
Hvac Pro
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Winnipeg, Canada
Posts: 10,038
Rewards Points: 714
Default

Furnace Vent Location


there is no official snow line/level. you can always keep shovelling it away. the 12" is so the pipe does not get blocked with snow and shut off with a safety control/pressure switch. you can always add pipe 2 it later/gooseneck it higher if necessary but it is better to try do it properly the first time instead of in the dead of winter when you have a problem. we don't know your area and everyone's yard is different with wind swirling the snow and building drifts in corners etc.
__________________
"Cut it twice and it is still too short".

Last edited by yuri; 06-29-2013 at 09:12 AM.
yuri is online now   Reply With Quote
Old 06-29-2013, 10:06 PM   #11
Experienced HVAC Tech
 
HVAC1000's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2012
Location: Northern Colorado
Posts: 357
Rewards Points: 250
Default

Furnace Vent Location


Quote:
Originally Posted by stevem447

Below is the URL to the manual, pg. 14 has the chart and layout of a typical home. My furnace is 70k and according to what I see on the chart it needs to be 12" from a door or Window. I n my case I have a permanently closed basement window, so I should be ok correct?

http://www.alpinehomeair.com/related...%2010-2012.pdf

Some additional questions: What is the difference between "Direct Vent" and "Other than Direct Vent"? I am using a standard exterior vent I assume this is direct? http://www.ebay.com/itm/Goodman-Flus...item3a6322e875

Can I run PVC vent pipe behind my furnace? There is a 14" space between the wall and the furnace.

I have a brick exterior on my home, what is the recommended method for creating the penetrations? I plan on using a hammer drill.
Direct vent is when you have two PVC pipes connected to the unit. One pulling in air from outside the other expelling flue gas. Non-direct vent is when you only have the one pipe expelling flue and you are pulling in combustion air from inside the structure
HVAC1000 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 06-30-2013, 09:44 AM   #12
Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2013
Posts: 147
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Furnace Vent Location


Quote:
Originally Posted by HVAC1000 View Post
Non-direct vent is when you only have the one pipe expelling flue and you are pulling in combustion air from inside the structure
The problem with non-direct is that it generates negative pressure in the house, creating a cold draft wherever the air comes in to make up for what went out the flue. 2" PVC is cheap, always run a combustion air vent. If you don't want two wall penetrations, use a concentric vent.

Advertisement

taxmantoo is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Natural Gas Cost For Furnace 1 Hour Run Time hammerlane HVAC 15 11-11-2013 11:34 AM
Furnace room Vent with fan grod777 HVAC 2 10-31-2011 10:14 AM
Smoke and Vent on a New Lennox Furnace Handymannabee HVAC 3 04-13-2011 04:46 PM
Direct Vent Wall Furnace - Pilot-Help !! roztom HVAC 4 04-28-2010 11:25 AM
Problems with new furnace..Overheating, having to reset. Furnace too big? Tommy2 HVAC 41 12-01-2008 02:55 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts