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Sophist 12-30-2008 09:59 AM

Furnace Kill Switch
 
I'm not looking for code comments, as I know they vary, but just some suggestions.

I have a month-old furnace and during the first firing, the HVAC installer asked for a kill-switch. I put one in while he was at the house, but just used a regular light switch. It is in the attic about 2 feet from the furnace and it protected from physical damage and attached to the truss. It also has the kill switch when the access panel is removed.

Should I install a metal box and switch with a 20amp fuse combo like other furnaces or am I good to go?

Thanks in advance

beenthere 12-30-2008 03:06 PM

No fuse needed or required at the switch, as long as its connected to the proper sized breaker is in the panel box.

chris75 12-30-2008 05:27 PM

All appliances require a disconnect, a switch is a means of disconnect.

pcampbell 12-30-2008 05:35 PM

Not sure, might by code need to have the red face plate???

biggles 12-30-2008 05:52 PM

that could be considered a service switch which is typical .you might consider cutting one into that attic box and drop another toggle switch into a hall closet or behind a picture with a red painted plate on it.

chris75 12-30-2008 06:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by biggles (Post 204505)
that could be considered a service switch which is typical .you might consider cutting one into that attic box and drop another toggle switch into a hall closet or behind a picture with a red painted plate on it.


By building code, only oil fired appliances require a disconnect outside of the room of the appliance.

jamiedolan 12-30-2008 09:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by chris75 (Post 204495)
All appliances require a disconnect, a switch is a means of disconnect.

Can a breaker serve as a disconnect if it is a dedicated circuit and the furnace is in the same room as the panel that serves it?

Jamie

hvaclover 12-30-2008 11:38 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jamiedolan (Post 204631)
Can a breaker serve as a disconnect if it is a dedicated circuit and the furnace is in the same room as the panel that serves it?

Jamie


No. Not as sole means of interrupting electrical supply.

Switch is supposed to be readily reachable and in plain site mounted on or adjacent to equipment.

I have a job that has the furnace electrical supply connected to a breaker as you describe. I would not want to have to fumble opening the panel door and then hoping I hit the right breaker in an emergency.

A switch at the equipment takes all the risk out of finding the right disconnect.

chris75 12-31-2008 08:51 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hvaclover (Post 204696)
No. Not as sole means of interrupting electrical supply.

Switch is supposed to be readily reachable and in plain site mounted on or adjacent to equipment.

I have a job that has the furnace electrical supply connected to a breaker as you describe. I would not want to have to fumble opening the panel door and then hoping I hit the right breaker in an emergency.

A switch at the equipment takes all the risk out of finding the right disconnect.


Code reference? Of course a breaker can be used as the disconnect. Check out section 422.31

chris75 12-31-2008 08:52 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jamiedolan (Post 204631)
Can a breaker serve as a disconnect if it is a dedicated circuit and the furnace is in the same room as the panel that serves it?

Jamie

Yes a breaker can be used as the disconnect. Check out section 422.31 for all the rules that go with it.

hvaclover 12-31-2008 08:55 AM

Conflicts with mechanical law. Easier to find one switch on the equipment and not find out that the furnace breaker was mislabeled while turning off at breaker during emergency..

chris75 12-31-2008 08:57 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hvaclover (Post 204818)
Conflicts with mechanical law. Easier to find one switch on the equipment and not find out that the furnace breaker was mislabeled while turning of at breaker during emergency..

What mechanical law are you speaking of? And not saying I would go out of my way to not include a service switch, but just speaking code. :)


People tend to see something done a certain way for some period of time they tend to believe its actually some kind of law. :)

hvaclover 12-31-2008 09:06 AM

Has been included in ever form of mechanical code ever adapted. It is pretty much a unwritten law but more to the fact is it makes sense.

Sophist 12-31-2008 09:09 AM

Great Discussion but I failed to convey that the switch I was talking about has a 20 amp fuse with it in the same box. It is metal, has the switch and a small metal cover next to the switch that covers the fuse.

Would this be overkill? New house with 12-2 to the furnace and a 20amp breaker at the sub-panel.

Currently have just a regular light switch next to the furnace.

hvaclover 12-31-2008 09:25 AM

You are good to go with te existing switch. Can't see why you'd want it fused, though. Breaker should plenty over current protection.

But around here the branch circuits are all protected for 15 amps.


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