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Old 09-05-2011, 06:32 PM   #1
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Furnace exhaust - out or up and out?


Hello folks, the previous owner used single-wall exhaust pipe for the furnace and it went up the chimney out the top of the house. What can I use to replace it? I've got 2x90 bends to make and about 16 foot upwards?

Can I bore a hole in the side of the house that the furnace is near and just pipe it up and out using stainless or something? It's behind a fence in the back so I don't care about how it looks from the street.

Is there something else I should consider? Should I use the furnace and try to find flex tubing and fish it through? I am in the Seattle area.

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Old 09-05-2011, 06:46 PM   #2
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Furnace exhaust - out or up and out?


How about some information first.
What size is your furnace and what size is its vent opening.Is the hot water heater involved? Is the 16 foot the measurement of the Chimney hight or is the furnace 16 foot from the chimney?
I don't know about where you are but in my home place,running B vent up the side of the house outside is a code violation.
You could run 2100 degree chimney outside but it is expensive.What fuel are you using?If its oil you have to use 2100 degree pipe.

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Old 09-05-2011, 11:02 PM   #3
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Furnace exhaust - out or up and out?


Thanks REP, it's a Trane furnace, an older one, model number: TUE100A960K1. It's got 4 inch single-wall now from the unit to the thimble in the masonry. Then it's up about 5 feet to a 90 then another 10 feel up the roof through the flue in the chimney that is ceramic lined. The hot water heater is not involved.

You are right, running the B vent up the side doesn't seem correct, but getting something flexible up and out is something I am having problems finding. I know the B type is the type I should use. I am wondering what alternatives I can use, should I try to find a stanless flex? I tried Lowe's, Home Depot, MeClendon's and none of these folks have been able to help...

All said, it sounds like I need to run it up through the chimney like it was. My question is can I use single-wall, double wall (B), some kind of synthetic I just don't know about that I can bend and/or use 90 degree elbows?

All natural gas.

Thanks again for you help.
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Old 09-05-2011, 11:40 PM   #4
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Furnace exhaust - out or up and out?


The best thing would be to run 4" B vent from the furnace and up the chimney.Taking out the 90 degree bend in the chimney so the B vent could go stright up.
You can't do that if the water heater goes into the chimney now.You would have to connect the furnace and water heater just before it whent up and it would have to be sized correctly for both appliances.4" might be big enough for both but I'm not sure so it would have to be properly sized.
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Old 09-06-2011, 06:07 AM   #5
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Furnace exhaust - out or up and out?


What size is the actual pipe inside the chimney now ? Not the pipe from the heater to the thimble but the actual size that goes to above the roof line?
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Old 09-06-2011, 11:19 AM   #6
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Furnace exhaust - out or up and out?


Thanks REP, I won't be able to get around the 90 degree bend in the chimney to get up and out. This is just the furnace, the water heater exhaust is on the other side of the house, properly vented up. What I am really looking for is an alternative to the 4" B vent that is good and flexible for this type of application.
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Old 09-06-2011, 11:21 AM   #7
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Furnace exhaust - out or up and out?


Thanks COLDIRON - there used to be 4 inch 'dryer vent' tubing that connected past the thimble that I pulled out, it was all rusted and not well connected. It was a real mess in there. Good thing is that I don't need to run the furnace for a couple more weeks, it's been off since July.
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Old 09-06-2011, 01:38 PM   #8
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Furnace exhaust - out or up and out?


Are you sure that was dryer vent ? A aluminum or stainless steel chimney liner will look somewhat like a dryer vent because it is flexible, that liner goes all the way up to the roof, I have a feeling you ripped out the chimney liner that went to the roof. Go to the roof and see if the pipe in the chimney looks like the part you ripped out. If it is you can rip the rest out from the roof and install a new one.
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Old 09-06-2011, 02:51 PM   #9
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Furnace exhaust - out or up and out?


Thanks COLDIRON - Not positive, but it was pretty flimsey and well rusted out with mineral deposits all throughout. I tore it all out months ago.
Is there a type of flex pipe, like dryer exhaust, that I can use for this application? Can I use any standard, single-wall flex to do this? Does it need to be stainless?
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Old 09-06-2011, 03:03 PM   #10
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Furnace exhaust - out or up and out?


Quote:
Originally Posted by justininc View Post
Thanks REP, I won't be able to get around the 90 degree bend in the chimney to get up and out. This is just the furnace, the water heater exhaust is on the other side of the house, properly vented up. What I am really looking for is an alternative to the 4" B vent that is good and flexible for this type of application.
What you are talking about is alum,chimney liner.This is approved for gas venting and it is flexible.
The only draw back is that it needs to be inspected every few years for erosion caused by acidic condensation..
The same configuation can be had in stainless but it is more expensive.It dosen't need the inspections that ga
the alum needs.
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Old 09-06-2011, 03:51 PM   #11
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Furnace exhaust - out or up and out?


If you purchase a new liner install it from the roof down , buy a cap to fit the end and screw it on then tie a rope or something similar on the cap with a weight or something on the end then try to get the end down thru the chimney and have someone on the roof feed the new liner in while
the person downstairs puts tension on the line. Don't forget you have to remove all of the old liner first. One more thing get the right Length.

You should probably purchase stainless steel, don't forget the accessories like new bird screen and cap.


Last edited by COLDIRON; 09-07-2011 at 07:00 AM. Reason: changed text
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