Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > HVAC

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 12-26-2006, 09:02 PM   #16
Thoroughbred Mopar Man
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: South/East Kansas
Posts: 638
Share |
Default

Finding DIY HVAC Resources


Hi hennyh

A oxy / acetylene torch is probably the easiest to control your temperature with. A turbo torch works ok but takes slightly longer to reach your target temp of about 1200 deg. Silfos is the best method for connecting any high pressure or high vibration refrigeration system. Thats why all major manufacturers use it. If it is available to you 6 percent is a little less pricy. Forgot to put this in for hennyh, you will want to use a #00 tip instead of a #2. You are getting alot of heat in a hurry with a #2, chances are you will either melt or crystalize the copper.

Good luck
Rusty


Last edited by #CARRIERMAN; 12-27-2006 at 08:31 AM.
#CARRIERMAN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-26-2006, 10:46 PM   #17
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 6
Default

Finding DIY HVAC Resources


Guys, thanks and I think hennyh is right that you don't actually seem to be disagreeing (but what else would one do on a forum?)

Question: some of the DIY stuff I have seen recommended running all of the linesets as dryfit and then leaving it to a licensed dude to do all the final connections and fill the system.

Seems reasonable and would get me away fron the stay bright vs brazing debate but if it is critical that the system stay clean and dry, why would anyone want to leave a loose fit system sittign around till the contrcator shows up?

2 cents and up requested.

ASK
askme233 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-27-2006, 08:23 AM   #18
Thoroughbred Mopar Man
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: South/East Kansas
Posts: 638
Default

Finding DIY HVAC Resources


Hi askme233

Not much of a debate. Most of the time when the systems were installed with the intent of adding air. They did not necessarily want it to be years later. But sometimes that is how things happen. As far as the evaporator goes, as long as it has not been open to the atmosphere and you can find equipment to match up to it. You should be fine, but I do not know what you are working with entirely.

Good luck
Rusty

Last edited by #CARRIERMAN; 12-27-2006 at 09:20 AM.
#CARRIERMAN is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 12-28-2006, 08:54 AM   #19
Newbie
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 6
Default

Finding DIY HVAC Resources


Rusty,

Thanks, but I meant more that some of the DIY resources suggest running the linesets but not performing any of the actual soldering/brazing and just leaving them dryfit. The idea is that then a contractor comes to solder all the joints, fill the system and do the final check out.

Seems like a nice idea if you have one or two elbows, but I forsee many more connections deep in the structure of the house (running a lineset fron the attic, through walls to the basement and then out to the pad).

I was expecting pros might reply with "NFW would I do someone else's soldering" or "no way I would fill a system I didn't do all the joints myself" which would both be helpful feedback.

ASK

askme233 is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Do I need a HVAC return vent in basement? westing HVAC 13 04-03-2014 01:43 AM
New HVAC Issue calvins HVAC 6 11-14-2011 09:37 PM
History of HVAC Industry Brands winkydink HVAC 8 03-25-2011 07:28 AM
HVAC plans for remodel wease HVAC 3 03-23-2011 10:47 AM
new 3 ton hvac Payne units. No cool air comes out when fan, compressor,thermostat run runbikeengr HVAC 10 04-10-2007 05:59 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.