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-   -   fastening insulation over metal ductwork (http://www.diychatroom.com/f17/fastening-insulation-over-metal-ductwork-84212/)

deerhunter 10-17-2010 09:05 PM

fastening insulation over metal ductwork
 
I'm planning to remove the insulation over some metal ductwork, seal the seams, and then reattach the old insulation. I noticed the insulation was fastened with staples. I wonder if such staplers are available at big box and not very expansive. Or are there other ways to fasten the insulation?

nap 10-17-2010 09:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deerhunter (Post 518593)
I'm planning to remove the insulation over some metal ductwork, seal the seams, and then reattach the old insulation. I noticed the insulation was fastened with staples. I wonder if such staplers are available at big box and not very expansive. Or are there other ways to fasten the insulation?

the staples aren't anything special. Just an old Bostich stapler will work fine. After you staple the insulation, you should use aluminum tape to actually seal the seams.

beenthere 10-18-2010 04:42 AM

The stapler normally used. Is a bend out stapler(bends the ends of the staple out, instead of in towards each other).

deerhunter 10-21-2010 09:50 PM

Is it OK if I skip the staples and just fasten the insulation by wrapping duct tape around it? I visited the bigbox and they don't seem to carry the kind of stapler.

kenmac 10-21-2010 10:07 PM

You would have to have an outward clinch staple gun. You could use the metal backed tape. Don't know if regular duct tape will hold or not

nap 10-21-2010 10:21 PM

do not use duck/duct tape. It is not intended for this and does not have the longevity required of the materials for this purpose.



http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...=263602_304652


If you can hold the insulation in place well enough to be able to tape it, I would be ok but chances are you are not going to be able to do a decent job.

Did you use mastic on the joints and seams?

beenthere 10-22-2010 04:09 AM

Duct tape is great for everything, BUT duct work and duct insulation. Use UL approved foil tape.

deerhunter 10-22-2010 11:27 AM

As about duct tape. I mentioned in my other post that the HVAC company that worked our duct system used duct tape extensively for sealing. The major connections of the duct that's connected to the air handler are all exclusively sealed by duct tape. To be fair to the Hvac company these tapes do seem to hold up for the about 4 years time. Still I decided to remove them and use mastic instead.

nap 10-22-2010 12:31 PM

well, since duct tape was originally created as "duck" tape but later, and for a reason I do not know, altered to be "duct" tape, I'm not sure how it ever came to be used on ducts at all.

this is from Wikipedia (the all knowing:laughing:)

Quote:

Usage on ductwork
To provide lab data about which sealants and tapes last, and which are likely to fail, research was conducted at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Environmental Energy Technologies Division. Their major conclusion was that one should not use duct tape to seal ducts (specialty tapes are available for this purpose). (They defined duct tape as any fabric-based tape with rubber adhesive.) The testing done shows that under challenging but realistic conditions, duct tapes become brittle and may fail.[6] Commonly duct tape carries no safety certifications such as UL or Proposition 65, which means the tape may burn violently, producing toxic smoke; it may cause ingestion and contact toxicity; it can have irregular mechanical strength; and its adhesive may have low life expectancy. Its use in ducts has been prohibited by the state of California[7] and by building codes in most other places in the U.S. However, metalized and aluminum tapes used by professionals are still often called "duck/duct tapes".
I found the bolded section particularly interesting.

deerhunter 11-03-2010 09:38 PM

I have bought this staple gun. But it seems the staples I bought from Lowes are too narrow to fit into it. On the manual of the staple gun it mentioned some part number from PowerFast, I cannot find the specific part number on line. There are some powerfast staples on ebay, but it's different part number. Can I buy these or do I have to stick to the part number?

I'm really surprised that there isn't a standard for staples. I though I just need to go to Lowes and pick the right specification. Actually, the only specification the manual mentioned is leg size. I thought this is the whole story but apparently, the crown width also matters.


Quote:

Originally Posted by nap (Post 521036)
do not use duck/duct tape. It is not intended for this and does not have the longevity required of the materials for this purpose.



http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll...=263602_304652


If you can hold the insulation in place well enough to be able to tape it, I would be ok but chances are you are not going to be able to do a decent job.

Did you use mastic on the joints and seams?


berend 11-03-2010 10:05 PM

Well if you got a regular staple gun it probably won't do the trick. You need an insulation staple gun with insulation staples. You can't get them from Lowes. It has to be from a HVAC supply house.

nap 11-03-2010 11:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by berend (Post 528255)
Well if you got a regular staple gun it probably won't do the trick. You need an insulation staple gun with insulation staples. You can't get them from Lowes. It has to be from a HVAC supply house.

if he bought the staple gun in the link I had provided, it was for ductwork.

beenthere 11-04-2010 04:20 AM

Doesn't it use regular T5 staples?

nap 11-04-2010 11:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beenthere (Post 528343)
Doesn't it use regular T5 staples?

it looks like it might

http://www.thermopan.com/products_powerfaststaple.htm

OldSingy 11-04-2010 02:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by deerhunter (Post 518593)
I'm planning to remove the insulation over some metal ductwork, seal the seams, and then reattach the old insulation. I noticed the insulation was fastened with staples. I wonder if such staplers are available at big box and not very expansive. Or are there other ways to fasten the insulation?

===========

Have you considered using adhesive insulation pins? See this link to see what I'm talking about.

http://www.alibaba.com/product-gs/32...SIVE_PINS.html


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