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-   -   failed inspection :( (http://www.diychatroom.com/f17/failed-inspection-173332/)

Startingover 03-01-2013 07:38 PM

failed inspection :(
 
Had my new Trane inspected today by the city. After the workers put it in last week, the owner of the AC Co. (in business for 40 yrs) came out and found a few little things and had his workers come back so that it would pass inspection.

After all that the inspector came and first thing he said was that the condenser outside is facing the wrong way. There's a panel on the side towards the house, which has to have 30" clearance.

Here's my question, (even the inspector said the Co I used was good) how could the installers put it facing the wrong way.........then, how could the owner come here to check the work and not notice.

Question 2. That cubby hole behind the return air.............they put the insulation with the shiney side facing the interior. The inspector said it looks nice and will be easy for me to clean (I never knew I was suppose to clean in there), anyway the inspector said if it leaks I won't see it and it won't dry out. (but it's all sealed up with mastik so how would water seep thru?) anyway, he said the insulation side should be outward, so if there's a leak it will stop at the shiney stuff and it will be exposed to air and it will dry up. But, he said he wouldn't write a violation for that and he'd let me decide if I want the insulation replaced and turned around.

What do you think?

I tried calling the AC Co. owner but he'd left for the weekend.

jagans 03-01-2013 08:47 PM

Sounds like everyone down there is on drugs. Since when do you need a city inspection on a replacement condenser??????

Pretty soon we will have nightly inspections by the authorities having jurisdiction to see if our teeth are properly brushed, and our axes are wiped.

How do you spell Comm-u-nis-mmm????

beenthere 03-01-2013 08:59 PM

Sounds like more then a condenser change out.

OP. Pics would help us.

Startingover 03-01-2013 09:54 PM

pictures tomorrow.

This was a whole new unit, condenser and air handler. Yes, a permit and inspection are required. Pretty much everything here needs a permit to make sure work is up to code.

hvactech126 03-01-2013 10:05 PM

please post the outdoor unit model number.

Startingover 03-01-2013 10:28 PM

ok, got the permit. The inspector called it a 'service door'. The cooling model is: 4TWB3030B 1 = 4TEC3F24B1

COLDIRON 03-02-2013 06:08 AM

Florida is one of the states that are pretty stringent on Contractors.

Over the years many rip off Companies operated in Florida and took advantage of the Elderly retired people.

The State requires Contractors to be certified and pass tests before working on equipment.

It's only for the benefit of the residents to have certification tests and license numbers and inspections.

I don't mean CFC certs either I mean knowledge tests, HVAC, Refrigeration, etc etc.

Startingover 03-02-2013 06:36 AM

2 Attachment(s)
coldiron, you're right about licensing here. A big crackdown began after hurricane Andrew in Miami when shady characters came down, offered to do reroofs, took money then vanished.

posting 2 photos, one each of the things I asked about.Attachment 66620

Attachment 66622

beenthere 03-02-2013 06:42 AM

Is the second pic of the inside or outside of what your talking about. close up like that with no other visual reference makes it hard to tell.

Yep, your serice panel is toward the wall, and makes it hard to work on the unit. Typical installer(referring to the guy that actually did the work, not company), doesn't care about how hard it is for the service tech to work on your unit. He isn't the one that will be working on it on a Saturday or Sunday, or worse at night time.

Startingover 03-02-2013 06:50 AM

2nd photo is the cubby hole when I open the return air grill. The shiney stuff is what the inspector said should be shiney side down and the insulation side upward.

My last unit leaked in here and I had to bail a bucket every 2 hrs. My new unit does have an 'overflow' gadget to shut off if it leaks.

Is it worth putting the company to extra trouble to have them tear this out and flip the insulation over? It does look nice and neat this way.

Why didn't the owner notice the panel was facing the wrong way when he came the next day to check the work so it would pass inspection? I still have faith in him.

beenthere 03-02-2013 06:56 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Startingover (Post 1127998)
2nd photo is the cubby hole when I open the return air grill. The shiney stuff is what the inspector said should be shiney side down and the insulation side upward.

My last unit leaked in here and I had to bail a bucket every 2 hrs. My new unit does have an 'overflow' gadget to shut off if it leaks.

Is it worth putting the company to extra trouble to have them tear this out and flip the insulation over? It does look nice and neat this way.

Why didn't the owner notice the panel was facing the wrong way when he came the next day to check the work so it would pass inspection? I still have faith in him.

Probably because its not easy now to correct, and he may have thought the inspector wouldn't notice it was closer then the instructions say to have it.


With the shinny side up, it won't absorb moisture as quick, and may help prevent mold if a leak occurs. I'd leave it as is since its a return.

yuri 03-02-2013 08:33 AM

they probably did not know the door needs 30 in. access as no installers ever do service (at least in the big companies) plus they usually like to keep the freon lines short and neat. now they will be longer and exposed and easy to step on or get damaged. code is code and they will have to extend them.

beenthere 03-02-2013 09:09 AM

Turned 90 degrees clockwise the lines will be between the wall and unit where they are fairly safe, except for clumsy service techs.


You would think the installers would know, unless its the first Trane they ever installed. Or they never had any other jobs inspected.

yuri 03-02-2013 09:17 AM

or the inspectors are not very thorough. clumsy Bubba sized techs, hoes, shovels, wood and every other kind of junk/debris I have seen piled on top of them. not an issue if you keep the area clean. they can put wood or a support under the lines if they stick out too far.

bobinphx 03-02-2013 11:08 AM

30 or 36 inch clearance for electrical work is a nec code directive or at least what I have been told...I think, could be osha too. I know that at work we have to have 36 inches in front of all electrical panels kept clear. It was explained to me that this open space is so that if someone working on the devices, begins to fall into the panel, there is time for them to arrest their fall. It was also expained that the 36 inches also helps to keep workers from being cramped and or tripping on things and falling into the panel.

Inspectors are the home owners best friend in my book. I wish there were more of them. Inspectors are the subject matter experts that have no other vested interest then the life / safety of the building ocupants. I can tell you that I have had to help neighbors and friends correct things that various trades have fouled up. None of these issues would have existed if an inspector was involved. I also firmly believe in the power of the registar of contractors as a last resort.


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