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Old 01-21-2008, 08:42 PM   #1
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Equipment Room Heater


Is there a natural gas heater that comes on when the temp nears freezing, and that doesn't shut off if the oxygen level gets low? I have an equipment room with an electric heater, but I would like to add a natural gas heater, in case the electric would go out. Thanks, Carlos.

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Old 01-21-2008, 09:44 PM   #2
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Is there a natural gas heater that comes on when the temp nears freezing, and that doesn't shut off if the oxygen level gets low? I have an equipment room with an electric heater, but I would like to add a natural gas heater, in case the electric would go out. Thanks, Carlos.

trying to kill someone? That is an odd question.

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Old 01-22-2008, 05:06 PM   #3
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Equipment Room Heater


you need combustion air, or install a 90% furnace that usees a 2 pipe set up. one pipe exahaust the other pipe is fresh air intake for furnace.
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Old 01-22-2008, 05:45 PM   #4
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I hate to break it to you but if the electric is out, so is the gas unit, the fan would operate electrically.
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Old 01-22-2008, 05:45 PM   #5
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and that doesn't shut off if the oxygen level gets low?
That oxygen sensor is there as a safety device.

I'm more concerned about using a gas appliance in a confined space such as you're asking about. Too little make up and combustion air can make for dangerous by-products. Too little oxygen can cause you to pass out and die if you entered that space and didn't realize it. You might rethink your goals here and keep safety as one of the top most goals on your list.

Good luck.
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Old 01-22-2008, 05:56 PM   #6
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Carlos, one question I did forget to ask is what type of equipment is in this room?
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Old 01-22-2008, 06:18 PM   #7
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And how big is the room? Cubic feet?
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Old 01-23-2008, 02:18 PM   #8
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Equipment Room Heater


Gentleman, thanks for all the replies. In response, this equipment room is a metal room attached to my garage, approximately 9x8x7, about 500 cubic feet. It contains my central air unit, pool pump, filter, and pool heater. When the door swings open, there is only a small space to stand, with equipment in a semi circle around you. There is really no possibility of being overcome by fumes. I go hunting for 5 weeks every fall. Last year while I was gone there were ice storms in St. Louis, that caused power outages for most of the area. I prefer not to winterize the pool. I broke my back in an accident, and it's difficult for me to drain everything. The pool is in an enclosure, so I can swim every month, or so, as therapy for my back. I intended to use an infared heater, without a fan, that would still heat the room, if the power went off. I guess it would need a battery, to turn it on when the temp got too low, if such a heater exists. Of course, it may be too expensive. I appreciate all of your suggestions. Thanks, Carlos.
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Old 01-24-2008, 10:05 AM   #9
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install a generater that powers up when you lose electric.
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Old 01-24-2008, 12:21 PM   #10
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You could use a direct vent natural gas / propane stove hooked up to a millivolt thermostat. They have a sealed combustion chamber with a standing pilot and AA batteries open the gas valve.
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Old 01-24-2008, 07:24 PM   #11
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You could use a direct vent natural gas / propane stove hooked up to a millivolt thermostat. They have a sealed combustion chamber with a standing pilot and AA batteries open the gas valve.

NO millivolts produced by the powerpile generator operate the gas valve.
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Old 01-25-2008, 07:49 AM   #12
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You are correct bigMikeB, the powerpile supplies the voltage for the gas valve, but the pile gets its energy from batteries. My intention was to show another option and not fully explain the operation of the stove to the op. If it were me I would get a generator with an auto transfer switch and not put in a dedicated heater for a storage / utility space.
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Old 01-25-2008, 05:19 PM   #13
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No, a chemical reaction in the pilot assembly produces 750 millivolts, that is the voltage that opens the gas valve. This is the type of system that old floor furnaces used. If you put 1.5 volts (typical battery voltage) or more to a powerpile valve it would just burn out the coil.
No batteries required, nor did they exist when this technology was invented.


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