DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum

DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum (http://www.diychatroom.com/)
-   HVAC (http://www.diychatroom.com/f17/)
-   -   Enviro-Safe 22a refrigerant vs R22 (http://www.diychatroom.com/f17/enviro-safe-22a-refrigerant-vs-r22-152582/)

psehorne 08-04-2012 12:36 PM

Enviro-Safe 22a refrigerant vs R22
 
EDIT: fixed the link to Enviro-Safe 221 refrigerant.

I don't plan on bying any Enviro-Save 22a refrigerant - R22 substitute at 1/3 the price; I have a tank of R22 that should last me for years. I'm just wondering if any forum members have experience with it and your 'informed' opinions.

Thanks,
Paul

turnermech 08-04-2012 12:49 PM

I have not priced it latley. It was more than R-22 the last time I did.

ea0680 08-04-2012 12:59 PM

I have seen the same stuff and was wondering if it was too good to be true (and you know the saying about that ).

I would like to hear what the pros think - other than just a quick - "r22 freon and oil only" response, it would be good to hear if this is indeed a valid alternative and if not, why not - as it seems like it cools better than freon - on paper- and wonder if anyone has real world experience with this stuff.

If this is for real - what would stop me from then buying a new R22 a/c system and having it filled only with the converted equivlant of r22a and get a 30% more efficient system? and if I need to add r22a or fix my system in the future, I can do it myself as no EPA certification is needed for it.

I am sure there is a downside that will pointed out and look forward to the discussion on it.

psehorne 08-04-2012 01:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by turnermech (Post 981293)
I have not priced it latley. It was more than R-22 the last time I did.

Their web site shows $120 for a 30# tank. Actual content is 12# of 22a, but is supposed to be equivalent to 30# of R22.

psehorne 08-04-2012 01:10 PM

I have sent them (Enviro-Safe) an email asking for charging instructions, pressures, temperatures, etc. and if any conversion is need to an existing R22 system besides just changing the refrigerant.

beenthere 08-04-2012 02:10 PM

Its not an EPA approved refrigerant. It contains R290.

turnermech 08-04-2012 02:27 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by turnermech (Post 981293)
I have not priced it latley. It was more than R-22 the last time I did.

I guess I was thinking of the hot shot 22 which i see at the supply houses. I know nothing about it other than it cost more than r-22 last I checked. At a glance that is what I thought we were talking about.

psehorne 08-04-2012 03:20 PM

EDIT: fixed the link to Enviro-Safe 221 refrigerant.

Marty S. 08-04-2012 08:50 PM

It's a zeotropic blend containing Propane, Butane and Isobuten. As beenthere stated it's not on the approved R22 replacement list for for air conditioning so at this time it's illegal to do so. IMO it will never be approved due to the fire/explosion fear.

Zeotropic means when there's a leak it all has to be replaced instead of simply adding a little. Recovery requires specialized explosion proof equipment. Saving $30 up front instead of using R22 is going to cost you hundreds later in recovery and disposal fees.

ea0680 08-04-2012 09:10 PM

Doesn't sound good to me

scottmcd9999 08-05-2012 06:06 AM

It will also void the warranty on your system, for those who are installing the dry-ship units. I don't know of any compressor manufacturer who approves of anything other than R22 in their R22 compressors.

ben's plumbing 08-05-2012 10:03 AM

it plain and simple DON"T USE IT ben sr:no::no:

psehorne 08-06-2012 11:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Marty S. (Post 981595)
It's a zeotropic blend containing Propane, Butane and Isobuten. As beenthere stated it's not on the approved R22 replacement list for for air conditioning so at this time it's illegal to do so. IMO it will never be approved due to the fire/explosion fear.

Zeotropic means when there's a leak it all has to be replaced instead of simply adding a little. Recovery requires specialized explosion proof equipment. Saving $30 up front instead of using R22 is going to cost you hundreds later in recovery and disposal fees.

I understand the R410a is also explosive. Does it require
Quote:

specialized explosion proof equipment
also?

scottmcd9999 08-07-2012 05:15 AM

410A isn't flammable or explosive. As with any tanked gas/liquid, there is a risk of that TANK exploding if it's not handled properly, but that's not limited to 410A.

Here's the info from National Refrigeration's MSDS sheet on 410A:

FLASH POINT:
Gas, not applicable per DOT regulations

FLASH POINT METHOD:
Not applicable

AUTOIGNITION TEMPERATURE:
>750C

UPPER FLAME LIMIT (volume % in air):
None by ASTM D-56-82

LOWER FLAME LIMIT (volume % in air):
None by ASTM E-681

FLAME PROPAGATION RATE (solids):
Not applicable

OSHA FLAMMABILITY CLASS: Not applicable

http://www.refrigerants.com/MSDS/r410A.pdf

beenthere 08-07-2012 05:28 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by psehorne (Post 983181)
I understand the R410a is also explosive.

Thats just one of the many myths that is/was spread around about R410A.


All times are GMT -5. The time now is 03:12 PM.


Copyright 2003-2014 Escalate Media LP. All Rights Reserved