Energy Home Ventilator - HVAC - DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum


Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > HVAC

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
Old 03-27-2012, 07:34 PM   #1
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Chicago
Posts: 57
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Energy Home Ventilator


Over the last 6 months I've taken a number of steps to try and solve an issue of temperature balancing throughout my home. I recently had a full energy audit done by an insulation company to identify issues within the home.

One of the recommendations in the report was to add an energy home ventilator b/c they said that my home is "tight" and would benefit from increased circulation of fresh air throughout the home. It was recommended I consult with an HVAC company for further details.

What does adding a ventilator essentially mean? I currently have two furnaces in the home, one for the basement and main level and one for the upstairs. Is this a piece of equipment that is added to the furnace or is a whole new major system? Any ideas on the cost of adding such a device?

Pretty clueless about all of this and just trying to further educate myself before getting too deep down the rabbit's hole.

Thanks.

Advertisement

ks-man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 08:21 PM   #2
Retired from the grind
 
gregzoll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Midwest - Central Illinois
Posts: 14,423
Rewards Points: 2,508
Default

Energy Home Ventilator


They are talking about "Air Exchanger Systems". http://search.yahoo.com/search;_ylt=...ir%20exchanger

Advertisement

__________________
Ren: Now listen, Cadet. I've got a job for you. See this button? Ren: Don't touch it! It's the History Eraser button, you fool! Stimpy: So what'll happen? Ren: That's just it. We don't know. Maybe something bad, maybe something good. I guess we'll never know, 'cause you're going to guard it. You won't touch it, will you?
gregzoll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 09:14 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Chicago
Posts: 57
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Energy Home Ventilator


From some of those pictures it seems that adding that is a pretty significant project. What would adding a device like this entail? I was hoping it could be incorporated into my current system. My home is completely finished so I can't easily make major infrastructure changes to my system.
ks-man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 09:30 PM   #4
Retired from the grind
 
gregzoll's Avatar
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Midwest - Central Illinois
Posts: 14,423
Rewards Points: 2,508
Default

Energy Home Ventilator


It has to be incorporated into the hvac system, and that means both systems would need one. What does it entail you ask? About $1,000 each starting at the low end, and figure in cost for man hours. You can do it yourself, but better to let a HVAC company do it, so that the work is warranted.

We are looking at one, due to if our home is closed up for a long period during Winter, Air starts to get stale, because there is not enough exchange from inside to out, even though our home is leaky. Personally, I would do it, because not only are you going to get a energy rebate, you will quickly notice a difference in both the feel of the air in the home, along with the smell of the air from cooking, etc.
__________________
Ren: Now listen, Cadet. I've got a job for you. See this button? Ren: Don't touch it! It's the History Eraser button, you fool! Stimpy: So what'll happen? Ren: That's just it. We don't know. Maybe something bad, maybe something good. I guess we'll never know, 'cause you're going to guard it. You won't touch it, will you?
gregzoll is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 09:52 PM   #5
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 26,533
Rewards Points: 4,704
Default

Energy Home Ventilator


Did they tell you your infiltration rate. my have been stated as ACH 50, or ACH natural.
beenthere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 10:02 PM   #6
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Chicago
Posts: 57
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Energy Home Ventilator


Quote:
Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
Did they tell you your infiltration rate. my have been stated as ACH 50, or ACH natural.
This is straight from my report and I think what you are asking to see:

"The blower door measured 3,670 CFM50 of air being pulled in through air leaks in your home's Building Envelope. This air is coming in through gaps, cracks, cavities in and around the components that make up the home's Building Envelope (which is typical of all homes that have not been air
sealed). A conversion calculation was done to estimate your home's "Natural" Air Changes per Hour of 0.21 ACHn. The entire volume of air in you home is exchanged approximately once every 4.84 hour(s). The goal is 1 air change every 3 hours or .35 ACHn."
ks-man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-27-2012, 11:41 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Manitoba, Canada
Posts: 343
Rewards Points: 266
Default

Energy Home Ventilator


These systems can be directly ducted to remove stale air form bathrooms, kitchens, etc. and tied back into the return air ducting of your existing system, or they can be installed in what is reffered to as a simplified method where the unit draws stale air from the house from the existing return air duct and re-introduces fresh air back into the return air duct closer to the furnace (depending on manufacturer anywhere from 3-10 ft of separation). The unit is then interlocked with your furnace fan so that the fresh air will be circulated throughout the home whenever the unit is running.

Depending on where you live you may select an HRV (typically for colder climates) or an ERV (typically for warmer climates). They come in various capacities (CFM) and make a big difference to your indoor air quality (especially if you have humidity issues in the winter time, provided you live in a colder climate).

By chance does your current system use a common return air ducting system, or are both furnaces tied into thier own dedicated return duct system?
HVACDave is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2012, 12:55 AM   #8
Member
 
Join Date: May 2011
Location: Chicago
Posts: 57
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Energy Home Ventilator


Quote:
Originally Posted by HVACDave View Post
These systems can be directly ducted to remove stale air form bathrooms, kitchens, etc. and tied back into the return air ducting of your existing system, or they can be installed in what is reffered to as a simplified method where the unit draws stale air from the house from the existing return air duct and re-introduces fresh air back into the return air duct closer to the furnace (depending on manufacturer anywhere from 3-10 ft of separation). The unit is then interlocked with your furnace fan so that the fresh air will be circulated throughout the home whenever the unit is running.

Depending on where you live you may select an HRV (typically for colder climates) or an ERV (typically for warmer climates). They come in various capacities (CFM) and make a big difference to your indoor air quality (especially if you have humidity issues in the winter time, provided you live in a colder climate).

By chance does your current system use a common return air ducting system, or are both furnaces tied into thier own dedicated return duct system?
Thanks for the information. In my current system each furnace has its own duct system. The upstairs unit has its duct work running throughout the attic. The main level and the basement has the ducts in the ceiling of the basement. I'm not sure if there are any ducts running up the walls of the main levels. I do think I have some vents high on the walls or the ceilings of the main level so I'd assume that means the ducts do travel vertically for those levels.
ks-man is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 03-28-2012, 05:18 AM   #9
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 26,533
Rewards Points: 4,704
Default

Energy Home Ventilator


Quote:
Originally Posted by ks-man View Post
This is straight from my report and I think what you are asking to see:

"The blower door measured 3,670 CFM50 of air being pulled in through air leaks in your home's Building Envelope. This air is coming in through gaps, cracks, cavities in and around the components that make up the home's Building Envelope (which is typical of all homes that have not been air
sealed). A conversion calculation was done to estimate your home's "Natural" Air Changes per Hour of 0.21 ACHn. The entire volume of air in you home is exchanged approximately once every 4.84 hour(s). The goal is 1 air change every 3 hours or .35 ACHn."
ASHRAE standards is 1 air exchange every 3 to 5 hours. You are within their standards.

Advertisement

beenthere is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Insulation and Energy Efficiency Help HomeInsulation Introductions 2 05-27-2011 10:24 PM
History of Lomonaco's Iron Concepts & Home Decor John Lomonaco Introductions 0 11-08-2009 11:39 AM
Energy efficient new home? kcrossley2 Building & Construction 10 01-27-2007 10:04 PM
A facelift for your home Grumpy Remodeling 0 07-07-2004 08:43 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts