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-   -   Electric baseboard heaters ? (http://www.diychatroom.com/f17/electric-baseboard-heaters-96358/)

ants1929 02-23-2011 02:34 PM

Electric baseboard heaters ?
 
I need to install an electric baseboard heater in a small bedroom . I shopped at lowes and they have 2 different types 1.standard electric 2.hydronic electric baseboard . both are made by Fahrenheat my question is it worth the extra money for the hydronic electric or is the standard one just as a good there is a significant price difference. if there is any one out there who has dealt with this recently i would appreciate your input thanks .


2480fool 02-23-2011 03:45 PM

If I am not mistaken, the hydronic unit requires a hot water source to function.
good luck,
2480fool

COLDIRON 02-23-2011 04:15 PM

Is the Hydronic one a plug in type?

Hubcap626 02-23-2011 04:19 PM

Hydronic = water

They are two different heaters at lowes, electric and hydronic which would be used with your boiler.

COLDIRON 02-23-2011 05:11 PM

Sorry I was confused I thought he was talking about the portable plug in oil jobs. If you already have a hot water circ. system in your house you should buy the hydronic and tie it into th existing system.

ants1929 02-23-2011 06:04 PM

Sorry everyone I did not include enough detail both are electric running on 240v they will be hardwired using a wall mounted type thermostat lowes sell the basic 240v electric www.lowes.com/pd_30054-49285-F2544_4294934542+4294965335_41_?productId=1082521& Ns=p_product_prd_lis_ord_nbr|0||p_product_quantity _sold|1&pl=1&currentURL=%2Fpl_Fahrenheat_429493454 2%2B4294965335_41_%3FNs%3Dp_product_prd_lis_ord_nb r|0||p_product_quantity_sold|1&facetInfo=Fahrenhea t
they also sell a high end electric 240v hydronic baseboard heater www.lowes.com/pd_225985-49285-PLF1004_4294934542+4294965335_41_?productId=106266 1&Ns=p_product_prd_lis_ord_nbr|0||p_product_quanti ty_sold|1&pl=1&currentURL=%2Fpl_Fahrenheat_4294934 542%2B4294965335_41_%3FNs%3Dp_product_prd_lis_ord_ nbr|0||p_product_quantity_sold|1%26page%3D2&facetI nfo=Fahrenheat
if anyone has installed these my question is it worth the money for the upgraded one thanks

bob22 02-23-2011 06:40 PM

The "hydronic" one:
http://www.lowes.com/pd_107221-49285...seboard%2Bheat

is filled with silicon oil. I'm not sure who the marketing guru was who thought silicon=hydronic but whatever.

The other is likely a plain, nichrome resistive element type (like a toaster) with no silicon oil/"hydronics".

Thermodynamics being what they are, you can't get more energy out than is put into a system. So, for every watt of energy spent heating up the oil, those can't be used for heating the air in the room. Intuitively, it seems to make sense that the oil would "retain" the heat, but, again, what is put in, is taken out. Otherwise, this would be akin to a perpetual motion machine; just heat it a bit, and it continues to give heat longer than it should. People on Amazon who have them and reviewed the silicon one seem to like it. How big is this room you are trying to heat? Where do you live? How hot do you want it to get? etc.....Children involved?

ants1929 02-23-2011 07:31 PM

i live in nj the room is 90sf with 9 1/2 foot ceiling the room is not insulated and will be used for a nursery . the rest of the 2 nd floor where the room is heated by large 90 year old radiators just this room gets cold because there is no heat in this room ..

beenthere 02-23-2011 08:53 PM

The "hydronic" electric baseboard will tend to minimize cool draft feelings since it takes longer to cool down. Other then that, it has no advantage as far as electric consumption.

ants1929 03-10-2011 07:05 PM

can anyone give me some input on the size for this type of room ?

beenthere 03-11-2011 04:23 AM

1,500 watts, give or take 500.

AllanJ 03-11-2011 08:23 AM

It's filled with silicon oil instead of water so:
(1) The oil does not rust out the interior of the heater as water would,
(2) The oil is non conductive compared with slightly rusty water and would not make for a short circuit if the heating element should fail.

Otherwise the behavior would be the same as a water filled heater unit.

The "dry" heater and the oil filled model of the same wattage will deliver the same number of BTU's. While the oil filled heater will take longer to warm up when turned on, it will also take longer to cool down when turned off.

If the dry heater does not have visible glowing heating elements, both it and the oil filled heater, once warmed up, will behave in almost the same way in heating the room. Any differences depend on the shapes of the parts of the heater and the ways air can flow about the heater.


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