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Old 07-27-2012, 12:27 PM   #1
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Easy Seal/ Super Seal


Has anyone had any experiences good or bad using this stuff to seal leaks in a central air unit.

I have not been able to find many reviews on this product and I'd like some before I actually put the money out for it.( some what expensive ).

Any thoughts?
Thanks.

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Old 07-27-2012, 06:10 PM   #2
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Just .... say .... no.

Find the leak(s) and fix it (or them). Yes, it's a PITA but it's the right way to fix leaks on an HVAC system. No matter the claim, that gunk will cause nothing but troubles in A/C systems, and especially in older capillary tube systems.

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Old 07-27-2012, 06:59 PM   #3
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I hate the stuff. Clogs up metering devices which burns up compressors. Also had to buy new gauge heads on several occasions because of the junk. It will stop small leaks but the price of the can isn't nearly as expensive as the end repair bill is going to be.
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Old 07-27-2012, 10:42 PM   #4
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Easy Seal/ Super Seal


I will go against the grain and say it has its place to be used. I personally have only used it twice. So far in both cases it has stoped the leaks with no ill effect. Fixing leaks is not the problem it is finding them. Every unit I have added refrigerant to in my time in the industry I have spent the remainder of the hour (1 hr min for my company and every other company I have worked for) leak checking. I don't charge systems with large losses with out finding a leak. I do however have a great deal of customer who have small amouts of refrigerant needed every year or two. The hope is when charging one of these times when I spend the remainder of the hour min I will find it. I am alway willing to spend more time they just don't want to spend the money looking.

I do have a few units which leak a little more (say have to be charged twice a year). Some of these units are getting old and in less than ideal condition. these units are IMO not worth spending a lot of money to leak check. These cases this year I started considering the leak seal. I talk to the customers explane the risk/reward and have used it 2 times this year. Most of these cases the customer decied to do nothing other than my typical charge and leak check for remainder of the hr normal proceedure.
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Old 07-28-2012, 05:10 AM   #5
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I've experienced two systems this summer where I believe the leak stuff caused clogging and rendered the system inoperable. Granted in both cases the system was old but in each case the customer reported that prior to having the leak fix gunk added, the system would work fine when fully charged.

In both of those cases a pressure check immediately showed a clog in the evap section of the system.

Good news is we ended up with two system changeouts.
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Old 07-28-2012, 07:21 AM   #6
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If a system leaks enough to need o be recharged twice a year, its generally a big enough leak to find easily with an electronic leak detector.
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Old 07-28-2012, 08:32 AM   #7
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Easy Seal/ Super Seal


Thanks for the replays thus far.
I'm have some trouble understanding how if this stuff is so detrimental to AC units, why isn't there more information about the ill affects of it on the web?
I would think that if it caused so much damage to the point of having to replace the whole unit,why is there not more people complaining about that and why is it still available to purchase by the regular consumer?
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Old 07-28-2012, 08:47 AM   #8
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Quote:
I'm have some trouble understanding how if this stuff is so detrimental to AC units, why isn't there more information about the ill affects of it on the web?
I'd say because it's nearly impossible to say with 100% certainty that the leak gunk caused the failure, so it would be difficult (and perhaps illegal) to post comments blaming the leak gunk for the failure of the system.

If you're not familiar with a refrigerant system, then it's hard to understand why this stuff is a bad idea, but basically: There are some very, very small areas/orifices through which refrigerant must travel in your system (the capillary tubes, or the expansion valves, for example). The leak repair gunk basically flows through the system and attemtps to build up a "dam" at the point of the leak. Of course, it also coats the inside of your refrigerant pipes and such with the gunk, and especially at areas where there are jagged edges/grooves, etc etc. This includes those small areas. If enough gunk builds up in those areas, you begin to have troubles with refrigerant flow, which means you have trouble cooling the system. Once this happens there is no fixing the issue - you would have to determine where the clog is and replace that piece. Given that the leak gunk is still in the system, there's also no guarantee that it won't happen again, so it could become a vicious cycle.

Quote:
I would think that if it caused so much damage to the point of having to replace the whole unit,why is there not more people complaining about that and why is it still available to purchase by the regular consumer?
Again, it would be difficult to prove. Plus, there's lots of things that cause significant harm to many different things that are available for purchase. And I'm pretty sure that the folks who make that stuff do not intend for it to be used by "regular consumers" - the intent would be that an HVAC professional install the stuff.

For example. there are some new R22 replacements coming into the market (like this: http://www.super-freeze.com/super-fr...uivalent-tank/). Our local distributors are posting warnings about the use of those refrigerants, stating that doing so may void the compressor or manufacturer warranty on dry ship units, or on compressor replacements. That doesn't stop companies from selling the stuff, however.

Last edited by scottmcd9999; 07-28-2012 at 08:58 AM.
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Old 07-28-2012, 12:14 PM   #9
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Easy Seal/ Super Seal


I have just had my HVAC repairman use the Super Seal (with dry/r) on my out of warrenty 21 year old trane (live in North east area).

Here is why I chose this option and would like to know what others think. I knew I had a small leak in the system about 3 years ago when a (different) hvac repairman put in 3 pounds freon and a dye to find the leak. I never called him back to find the leak -however the system worked for 3 years - until this year when I seen the suction (big line) was no longer cold and would struggle to stay at 79 degrees in house ( temp difference from return to registers was about 10-12 degrees) . So I said to myself - I have a leak, and the dye was already in - so I bought a UV light and went to all the fittings/joints and exposed pipes looking for the glow-but did not see it - so the "easy" type fixes were pretty much out of the question and left really the evaporator coil -which I never cleaned in the 21 years.

So I opened up the plenum, and then looked at evap coil with the UV light -and can see a glow around the middle part on the fins on the inside of the A. I then cleaned the coil (which suprisingly wasnt that dirty) with evap coil cleaner. So now, up to this point, I had cleaned the condensor coils with water hose, cleaned the evap coil, and air filter is perfectly clean. I then check and now have even better airflow out the registers, but same temp diff of 10-12 degrees(no surprise).

So now here is my choice, I add freon at 50 bucks a pound - 3 pounds plus 100 bucks for labor (est 250) and then 3 years from now (if lucky) have to add more R-22 at who knows what rate as they phased it out -however with this choice I would have bought myself a few years of not paying 3.5K new system yet. Or I can pay them to come in and evacuate the lines, take out the evap coil, try to fix leak -reinstall -recharge- or just put in a new evap coil Either way- I faced about 800-1200 bill. If I was to pay that - I might as well just upgrade to the new 410a and get efficient unit -seeing the saved non repair of 1000 or so dollars as a "discount" to the new inevitable system install.

And now theres another choice. I did research and heard about the super seal stuff and heared the horror stories -compressor issues, line clogged etc. I also heard stories to how it worked very well. I heard that for my evap coil leak - that the super seal is actually pretty good at sealing the small slow leak . but my fear is- how do I know there is no air/moisture in the line now? wont it clog up? but I seen that Super Seal now comes with Dry/r included - which seems to clear out the moisture ,if any, in system. Cost of Super seal was 100 bucks.

I thought what was worst case senerio - I was going to have to pay 1K or 3.5 k with other 2 options but with this option -total cost with freon would be 350. This option also gives me the chance that I wont have to call back for another freon recharge until I decide to upgrade to new system- which could be 5 years or more -who knows. While its only been a few weeks since the HVAC repairman added the sealent - I have about 16-18 degrees difference between return and closest register, nice drop down to 48-50% humidity, and so far the system seems to be working /sounding fine. I also understand that now that sealent is in system, any future small leak will fill in quickly too.

So for me- with a 21 year old R22 phased out system with a small leak in evap coil , at least for my situation- I found that it was worth the risk as I would just upgrade to new system if any compressor issue did materialize as that was in the cards for me anyway giving the existing evap coil leak fix/replace cost I was facing before -and the age of system.
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Old 07-28-2012, 12:39 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ea0680 View Post
I have just had my HVAC repairman use the Super Seal (with dry/r) on my out of warrenty 21 year old trane (live in North east area).

Here is why I chose this option and would like to know what others think. I knew I had a small leak in the system about 3 years ago when a (different) hvac repairman put in 3 pounds freon and a dye to find the leak. I never called him back to find the leak -however the system worked for 3 years - until this year when I seen the suction (big line) was no longer cold and would struggle to stay at 79 degrees in house ( temp difference from return to registers was about 10-12 degrees) . So I said to myself - I have a leak, and the dye was already in - so I bought a UV light and went to all the fittings/joints and exposed pipes looking for the glow-but did not see it - so the "easy" type fixes were pretty much out of the question and left really the evaporator coil -which I never cleaned in the 21 years.

So I opened up the plenum, and then looked at evap coil with the UV light -and can see a glow around the middle part on the fins on the inside of the A. I then cleaned the coil (which suprisingly wasnt that dirty) with evap coil cleaner. So now, up to this point, I had cleaned the condensor coils with water hose, cleaned the evap coil, and air filter is perfectly clean. I then check and now have even better airflow out the registers, but same temp diff of 10-12 degrees(no surprise).

So now here is my choice, I add freon at 50 bucks a pound - 3 pounds plus 100 bucks for labor (est 250) and then 3 years from now (if lucky) have to add more R-22 at who knows what rate as they phased it out -however with this choice I would have bought myself a few years of not paying 3.5K new system yet. Or I can pay them to come in and evacuate the lines, take out the evap coil, try to fix leak -reinstall -recharge- or just put in a new evap coil Either way- I faced about 800-1200 bill. If I was to pay that - I might as well just upgrade to the new 410a and get efficient unit -seeing the saved non repair of 1000 or so dollars as a "discount" to the new inevitable system install.

And now theres another choice. I did research and heard about the super seal stuff and heared the horror stories -compressor issues, line clogged etc. I also heard stories to how it worked very well. I heard that for my evap coil leak - that the super seal is actually pretty good at sealing the small slow leak . but my fear is- how do I know there is no air/moisture in the line now? wont it clog up? but I seen that Super Seal now comes with Dry/r included - which seems to clear out the moisture ,if any, in system. Cost of Super seal was 100 bucks.

I thought what was worst case senerio - I was going to have to pay 1K or 3.5 k with other 2 options but with this option -total cost with freon would be 350. This option also gives me the chance that I wont have to call back for another freon recharge until I decide to upgrade to new system- which could be 5 years or more -who knows. While its only been a few weeks since the HVAC repairman added the sealent - I have about 16-18 degrees difference between return and closest register, nice drop down to 48-50% humidity, and so far the system seems to be working /sounding fine. I also understand that now that sealent is in system, any future small leak will fill in quickly too.

So for me- with a 21 year old R22 phased out system with a small leak in evap coil , at least for my situation- I found that it was worth the risk as I would just upgrade to new system if any compressor issue did materialize as that was in the cards for me anyway giving the existing evap coil leak fix/replace cost I was facing before -and the age of system.
Which means you'll have that stuff in your line set when its time to replace the system, and need to pay for a really good cleaning of the lines, or replace the lines.

Post back next year if your A/C is still running or not.
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Old 07-28-2012, 01:10 PM   #11
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Easy Seal/ Super Seal


Going from R22 to 410a system would mean new lines anyway (higher pressures I believe) - so I already had new lines in my new install price and was part of reason I said ok to the sealent as it will be gone with old system. I will be sure to update on any changes to system operation.

Let me be clear - If they never phased out the R22 freon or made such big efficiency improvements over the past 20 years - I probably would have done the evap fix and moved on. but such expense (1K or more) doesnt seem to make sense on such a now outdated system - at least to me.
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Old 07-28-2012, 01:19 PM   #12
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ea0680 View Post
Going from R22 to 410a system would mean new lines anyway (higher pressures I believe) - so I already had new lines in my new install price and was part of reason I said ok to the sealent as it will be gone with old system. I will be sure to update on any changes to system operation.

Let me be clear - If they never phased out the R22 freon or made such big efficiency improvements over the past 20 years - I probably would have done the evap fix and moved on. but such expense (1K or more) doesnt seem to make sense on such a now outdated system - at least to me.

Don't need new lines for R410A. new line sets aren't made any thicker today then they were 30 years ago.

A new coil today, can be used with an R410A condenser 5 years down the road.
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Old 07-28-2012, 01:42 PM   #13
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Well,
I'm not in a position right now to replace the unit and I don't want to take the chance of " bricking up" the unit I do have now.
I think I will just buy some r22 and gauges off of craigslist and just add the Freon myself as needed till I can replace the unit( 22 years old).
I see it as,why pay someone $70 a lb (r22) for Freon he has paid $10 a lb for when I can just DIY.
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Old 07-28-2012, 02:05 PM   #14
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I am only a homeowner with no knowledge of AC, but what I do know is that you cannot mess around with R22 freon yourself unless you are EPA certified. Not worth the risk IMO with big fines -as you stated only 3.5K would be too much for new system for you right now, but epa fines are tremendously larger.
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Old 07-28-2012, 02:15 PM   #15
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Quote:
Originally Posted by ea0680
I am only a homeowner with no knowledge of AC, but what I do know is that you cannot mess around with R22 freon yourself unless you are EPA certified. Not worth the risk IMO with big fines -as you stated only 3.5K would be too much for new system for you right now, but epa fines are tremendously larger.
Here's an example of how concerned the guy that did my recharge is about the EPA.
Recharged the system,removed the hoses.with the Freon hose pointing into my yard he opens the valve to clear out the Freon left in the line.
I don't think the EPA has the time,energy or resources to check on what home owners are doing with Freon.

Also as a side question for the HVAC guys.
How can u tell how much Freon in terms of lbs your putting into a unit so as to bill the customer accordingly?

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