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-   -   Duct to nowhere (drywalled over) (http://www.diychatroom.com/f17/duct-nowhere-drywalled-over-6690/)

tima2381 02-24-2007 05:13 PM

Duct to nowhere (drywalled over)
 
I was in my attic today checking out the joists for flooring purposes (they're 2x12, and it's a regular ridge/rafter/joist system), and while up there, I noticed a flexible duct disappearing into the insulation and terminating in a metal box that I couldn't correlate with the view from the room side of the ceiling. Sure enough, I have a photo from the framing stage showing a duct right there, so they must have drywalled over it when they installed the ceiling. This is brand new construction, so I will be talking to the builder about this. I can guess, but I'm interested to know what sorts of problems those more experienced than me think this can cause.

mikemy6 02-24-2007 08:15 PM

duct
 
Is this a bathroom below? They may have drywalled over an exhaust fan. Does the duct go to an exterior wall or to the roof? Can you post pics..

tima2381 02-24-2007 10:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikemy6 (Post 34673)
Is this a bathroom below? They may have drywalled over an exhaust fan. Does the duct go to an exterior wall or to the roof? Can you post pics..

Sorry, I didn't explain myself well. The duct goes from the furnace blower to a vent in the living room ceiling. I've been wondering why this room has only two widely spaced vents when a bedroom half the size also gets two vents. This would have been the middle vent, but it was mounted adjacent to a recessed light can, and I guess they chose to drywall over it rather than move it. I can't tell if they sealed it off somehow, but even if they did seal the vent, it would probably increase the noise level in the living room. If they didn't, then the duct is blowing hot/cold air directly onto the drywall (ceiling), which seems like it would be bad for a number of reasons. What do you think?

tima2381 02-24-2007 10:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tima2381 (Post 34681)
Sorry, I didn't explain myself well. The duct goes from the furnace blower to a vent in the living room ceiling. I've been wondering why this room has only two widely spaced vents when a bedroom half the size also gets two vents. This would have been the middle vent, but it was mounted adjacent to a recessed light can, and I guess they chose to drywall over it rather than move it. I can't tell if they sealed it off somehow, but even if they did seal the vent, it would probably increase the noise level in the living room. If they didn't, then the duct is blowing hot/cold air directly onto the drywall (ceiling), which seems like it would be bad for a number of reasons. What do you think?

Here's a photo I took in the framing stage; as you can see, the vent is right next to the can. Too bad I didn't notice it at the time.

http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u...rgeWebview.jpg

mikemy6 02-25-2007 10:23 AM

A Picture Worth A Thousand Words/$$$$
 
Its an easy fix because of your pics you know exactly where it is. Sweat + drywall = mold! These systems are well thought out usually, so icant see not needing that vent. When you call your contracter have him bring his roto-tool it was probably just a mistake by the drywallers.

tima2381 02-28-2007 12:10 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikemy6 (Post 34715)
Its an easy fix because of your pics you know exactly where it is. Sweat + drywall = mold! These systems are well thought out usually, so icant see not needing that vent. When you call your contracter have him bring his roto-tool it was probably just a mistake by the drywallers.

I think they will have to move it out some, as the vent is within an inch of a can and would look bad if left where it is. Once moved, the vent won't line up with the two vents on either side of it, but I guess that's OK. And it's definitely a live duct; I went up in the attic today and felt the cool, cool air pouring out of it onto the ceiling drywall (attic side), about a cm away.

mikemy6 03-01-2007 06:33 AM

Is moving it over to the left to the next run an option or will this just ugly up the spacing as per the 2 other vents? Are you running AC Im in NJ and weve been in the deep freeze all Feb. coldest in 60 years.

tima2381 03-03-2007 09:07 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikemy6 (Post 35186)
Is moving it over to the left to the next run an option or will this just ugly up the spacing as per the 2 other vents? Are you running AC Im in NJ and weve been in the deep freeze all Feb. coldest in 60 years.

Moving it left would put it about 6' from its neighbor to the left and 9' from its neighbor to the right. I could also move it forward so it would remain in the same joist space but lie between the two cans. I can't decide which would look better; oh well, maybe I'll take some pics and play some in Photoshop. I'm in south LA (the state), and it's been A/C season off and on for the last couple of weeks.

redline 03-04-2007 01:28 PM

If you left the vent there but moved the can then would that help?

tima2381 03-04-2007 10:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by redline (Post 35573)
If you left the vent there but moved the can then would that help?

They didn't drywall over the can, so it needs to stay where it is. (The ceiling, and whole house for that matter, is finished.)

mikemy6 03-18-2007 05:10 PM

Tima how did you make out?

tima2381 03-18-2007 11:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mikemy6 (Post 37452)
Tima how did you make out?

Been busy, and I haven't got around to it yet. There are a few things I'm still looking into before contacting the builder. The latest thing I noticed is a bathroom fan duct terminating in the attic, stapled to a rafter right under a ridge board. There's not even a ridge vent close to it. I've determined the 2003 IRC was in effect for the construction of my house in 2006, and I know the latest IRC disambiguates whether or not the duct is required to terminate to the outside (it is). Now to ask the city what the deal is. About the vent: I plan on asking them to move it over one space to the left as you suggested. Keeping all three in a row will look better than staggering them, and it will help cool the living area, which could use it more than the dining area anyway. Thanks for asking!

mikemy6 03-19-2007 09:05 AM

I agree on both points, I dont do many bath fans, but when I do I allways run them outside. I seems to me that if not, your just moving the moisture to some other place but still in your house.
Good luck!

pjpjpjpj 03-19-2007 12:02 PM

Seems like residential contractors often just terminate bathroom exhaust fans in the attic. It's probably no problem if it is from a half-bath, but you definitely want it terminating to the outside if there is a shower or tub (or other moisture-producer) in the room you are exhausting.

From your picture, it looks like the runout to the mystery grille is just flex duct. You could probably relocate it yourself if you want it done quickly and a contractor isn't available (I know how easy it is to find a contractor in south LA post-K :icon_rolleyes: ). Just make sure you keep wide sweeping turns in the duct and no sharp bends or kinks. Of course, you would have to pay for the ceiling grille if you did it yourself.... but as long as you could find one that matched the others, it might be worth it if the contractor is being a pain (grilles usually between $5 and $25).

You probably ought to do this sooner rather than later, as the cold air could create a permanent stain (mold) on your ceiling.

tima2381 03-19-2007 02:09 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by pjpjpjpj (Post 37557)
Seems like residential contractors often just terminate bathroom exhaust fans in the attic. It's probably no problem if it is from a half-bath, but you definitely want it terminating to the outside if there is a shower or tub (or other moisture-producer) in the room you are exhausting.

This is a full bath I'm talking about, and we do shower in it. The rationale probably includes, "It's so humid in southern La. anyway..." :) Hopefully the city code that was in effect last year is more clear than the 2003 IRC on this issue, so I can say "code violation" if the builder doesn't want to fix it. Most houses they're building out here don't have obvious bathroom vents on the roof, and obviously I can't tell if they're venting to the soffits, so I don't know what standard practice is. I need to check the master bathroom as well, but it's harder to get to.

Quote:

From your picture, it looks like the runout to the mystery grille is just flex duct. You could probably relocate it yourself if you want it done quickly and a contractor isn't available (I know how easy it is to find a contractor in south LA post-K :icon_rolleyes: ). Just make sure you keep wide sweeping turns in the duct and no sharp bends or kinks. Of course, you would have to pay for the ceiling grille if you did it yourself.... but as long as you could find one that matched the others, it might be worth it if the contractor is being a pain (grilles usually between $5 and $25).

You probably ought to do this sooner rather than later, as the cold air could create a permanent stain (mold) on your ceiling.
This is something I expect the builder to fix under new home warranty. They're still out here building a bunch of new houses and will be for at least another year or two.


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