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Old 03-04-2012, 01:43 AM   #16
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Drip pan for my heat pumps compressor


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Originally Posted by REP View Post
The installers should have left you with a home owners manual.In that little book it would show that "pump ups" are reccomended.If you look around you will find them on most heat pumps.You will not find them on a/c units.
Your idea of having a pan underneath the pump ups is perfectly acceptable and in your case probably a good idea .The only reason that they did not install the pump ups was to save the cost of these items.P.S. they are not expensive but if one cuts corners this is something one is apt to see eliminated.
It would be a real good idea to have the charge checked to make sure that isn't adding to the condensate one would normally expect.
ok. thats what i thought.

i just looked up pump ups/snowlegs..(finally)..and then found the installer manual for my unit online, it has some as an optional accessory.

what kind of work is involved when installing snow legs? would the unit need to be completely disconnected and lifted up, tilted? i will have the installer do it, i was just wondering. because if they are going to have to come out and disconnect it all, i might as well have them slide it off the carport onto the ground (2 feet away) of course on one of those slabs made for the outdoor units (with the snow legs and drip pan under it.)

kind of skeptical that they even know what they are, or that they exist...they are very professional people though...

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Old 03-04-2012, 01:54 AM   #17
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Drip pan for my heat pumps compressor


It all depends on how the lines have been run.They would have to lift the unit up at least the 12 inches without kinking the copper refrigerant lines.
To move the unit they would have to pump the unit down,make some alterations to the lines.
One man can't do it by himself so he would need a helper and 3-4 hours labor,possibly a new electrical whip, brazing of some copper fittings and maybe a couple oz of refrigerant plus the new pad and the pump ups.
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Old 03-04-2012, 08:33 AM   #18
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Drip pan for my heat pumps compressor


The difference between being just on the concrete and sitting in a pan. Is that on the concrete the water runs away a little before freezing, as you see of it wouldn't have ice over such a large area. In a pan, it won't have any where to run to and would just freeze in a much smaller area.

A pan with pump ups supporting the unit, will allow several gallons to collect before over flowing.
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Old 03-04-2012, 09:03 AM   #19
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slide a 2" lipped aluminum pan under it with a 3/4 FMP connection a PVC it away,or just the pan and let it evaporate with the day...ice build up coils busting please what is this the Titanic don't scare the guy... anything above 32.1F in the car port the ICE will melt...how about this park your car so the exhuast blows into the condenser pan and melts the ice as you warm it up going out for the day....going green or what if the sun swings on the car port in the winter the solar heat will melt it...for water to go from 32F water to 32F ice...my calculations... 20F with a wind chill of 25MPH in Texas?the pan is the best deal even plastic if you can find one and definitly slide something under the condenser to get it off the slab.HD/LOWES
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Old 03-04-2012, 09:09 AM   #20
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Guess you never seen the damage the ice does to a heat pump that isn't set up above the ground or its pad. It crushes the lower tubes of the coil.
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Old 03-04-2012, 09:15 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by biggles;
869873...for water to go from 32F water to 32F ice...my calculations... 20F with a wind chill of 25MPH in Texas?
Your calculations are off.
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Old 03-04-2012, 09:23 AM   #22
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that was just an guess... http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eNx99...ture=endscreen when the defrost cycle doesn't kick in and the ice is so thick you can't hear the compressor running in the heating mode...now that is ice...
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Old 03-04-2012, 09:31 AM   #23
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See a fair number like that every year.
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Old 03-04-2012, 11:21 AM   #24
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The difference between being just on the concrete and sitting in a pan. Is that on the concrete the water runs away a little before freezing, as you see of it wouldn't have ice over such a large area. In a pan, it won't have any where to run to and would just freeze in a much smaller area.

A pan with pump ups supporting the unit, will allow several gallons to collect before over flowing.
in a pan with a drain line, it would have some where to go....down the drain line....

once the ice has formed about 1-2" thick around the bottom of the unit, THERE IS NO DIFFERENCE sitting on the slab, or in a pan.....period. if you think there is, i would like a little more of an explanation of to why it is different. the one you provided doesnt explain anything, at all, because once it builds up on the slab.....it doesnt have anywhere to go, contradicting your statement. however, if you mean it has somewhere else to go before it freezes.....then how is that different then being in the pan (which too, has somewhere else to go)?

maybe i just completely misunderstand your reasoning?
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Old 03-04-2012, 11:29 AM   #25
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slide a 2" lipped aluminum pan under it with a 3/4 FMP connection a PVC it away,or just the pan and let it evaporate with the day...ice build up coils busting please what is this the Titanic don't scare the guy... anything above 32.1F in the car port the ICE will melt...how about this park your car so the exhuast blows into the condenser pan and melts the ice as you warm it up going out for the day....going green or what if the sun swings on the car port in the winter the solar heat will melt it...for water to go from 32F water to 32F ice...my calculations... 20F with a wind chill of 25MPH in Texas?the pan is the best deal even plastic if you can find one and definitly slide something under the condenser to get it off the slab.HD/LOWES
thanks, this was my initial thoughts on the issue. i mean its texas....this year i only saw water freeze once. However, the carport has an awning, and is on the north side of the house, so there is only sun in the morning that hits the unit. its just that last year (or the year before) it froze a lot, thats when i saw the ice build up on the slab.

its been 28F here, all night before, water still didnt freeze....

i bet if i use a black poly pan (or even just paint a metal one black) for the drip pan.....i would even have a lot better chance of it not freezing.
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Old 03-04-2012, 11:44 AM   #26
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in a pan with a drain line, it would have some where to go....down the drain line....

once the ice has formed about 1-2" thick around the bottom of the unit, THERE IS NO DIFFERENCE sitting on the slab, or in a pan.....period. if you think there is, i would like a little more of an explanation of to why it is different. the one you provided doesnt explain anything, at all, because once it builds up on the slab.....it doesnt have anywhere to go, contradicting your statement. however, if you mean it has somewhere else to go before it freezes.....then how is that different then being in the pan (which too, has somewhere else to go)?

maybe i just completely misunderstand your reasoning?
1 to 2" without a pan, and sitting in a 2" high pan and then building up another 1 to 2" is a lot different.

If you use a pan, it will need a heater as was said earlier in the thread, and so will the drain line.
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Old 03-04-2012, 11:48 AM   #27
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Drip pan for my heat pumps compressor


I see all the posters have an idea of a drip pan with a drain line.

since this unit is outside on a cncrete pad, is there any reason you couldn't cut a small channel in the concrete leading to the yard ( and possibly an underground piece of PVC or something leading away from the slab?
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Old 03-04-2012, 02:59 PM   #28
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1 to 2" without a pan, and sitting in a 2" high pan and then building up another 1 to 2" is a lot different.

If you use a pan, it will need a heater as was said earlier in the thread, and so will the drain line.
still doesnt make sense to me. i do not see a difference. either way it would still keep building up past the point of the 1-2" either way. am i incorrect? I would really like to understand your reasoning of it being different. if the ice builds up on the slab 1-2" or the pan fills up its capacity of 1-2" then they become one in the same. they equal each other as well as their capacity to build up higher or their capacity/capability of draining away/overflowing....

im really not trying to be annoying here. just trying to see what im not understanding.
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Old 03-04-2012, 03:02 PM   #29
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I see all the posters have an idea of a drip pan with a drain line.

since this unit is outside on a cncrete pad, is there any reason you couldn't cut a small channel in the concrete leading to the yard ( and possibly an underground piece of PVC or something leading away from the slab?
anythings possible...
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Old 03-04-2012, 03:47 PM   #30
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Drill a hole in the slab and make a drain.

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