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-   -   Draft Inducer Squealing Noise (http://www.diychatroom.com/f17/draft-inducer-squealing-noise-121387/)

rbh123456789 10-26-2011 01:28 PM

Draft Inducer Squealing Noise
 
Hey guys,

I have a Keeprite N9MP1 single stage 90 AFUE furnace.

The draft inducer has been making a high-pitched squeal for over a year now.

I've decided to purchase a new inducer assembly (you can google 'Heil Draft Inducer Assembly 1172823' to see what i am looking at).

My question is, will i need a sealant, or gasket installed between the inducer housing and the metal furnace plate (which the inducer fastens to)?

I know all models might be different, but i assume that since all high efficiency furnaces have an inducer, there should be a general best-practice? Perhaps the gasket is built-in to the back of the assembly...not sure.

I have read through the furnace documentation, and they make no mention of any sealant. In addition, i was looking through the replacement-parts manual for my model, and there doesn't appear to be a separate gasket that is needed.

beenthere 10-26-2011 04:23 PM

Some com with the gasket, some don't. High temp RTV silicon works fine.

hvac5646 10-26-2011 05:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beenthere (Post 757364)
Some com with the gasket, some don't. High temp RTV silicon works fine.

The flue temps aren't 400*F going into the inducer. A good standard 100% silicone caulk will suffice and save you some money and head aches. RTV will cement the inducer to the mating surfaces and could cause some major issues if the inducer need to removed in the future.

Silicone caulk won't give you that problem.
I know...some of the pros are going to disagree but I was told this by a factory rep and after more than 350 inducer change-outs it has never failed me yet...

Other pros are invited to share their thoughts.

beenthere 10-26-2011 05:43 PM

On a 90%er they aren't, on some 80% they are. RTV won't cause any problems unless its applied sloppily.

hvac5646 10-26-2011 06:15 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beenthere (Post 757431)
On a 90%er they aren't, on some 80% they are. RTV won't cause any problems unless its applied sloppily.

Agree on the 80%... but RTV is a bit difficult to work with and has stuck on tight on a lot of jobs. And like you said SOME 80s have high flue temps but not high enough to prevent silicone usage. The caulk I use is a brand called HVAC hi-temp caulk good up to 450*f.

beenthere 10-26-2011 06:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by hvac5646 (Post 757467)
Agree on the 80%... but RTV is a bit difficult to work with and has stuck on tight on a lot of jobs. And like you said SOME 80s have high flue temps but not high enough to prevent silicone usage. The caulk I use is a brand called HVAC hi-temp caulk good up to 450*f.

I've used that already, it works ok.

Generally, you shouldn't have to replace the inducer twice on the same furnace. So I use RTV.

ben's plumbing 10-26-2011 07:00 PM

fight nice boys as a side thought ask any supplier what they recommend as a sealant for inducers 80% or 90% then i rest my case.....

rbh123456789 10-26-2011 08:44 PM

thanks for all the thoughts everyone.
i ended up emailing the parts distributor, and asked them what actually comes in the box that the inducer is shipped in.
he advised that the gasket and rubber clamp (?) comes with the inducer assembly. so i guess that solves my issue. i think the install should be pretty straight forward; shut off the power to the furnace, disconnect and reconnect the new motor in the same manner.

diyorpay 10-27-2011 02:31 PM

I would not throw out the old one because, in the dead of winter:
1) an old squeally one that works still works if you needed it
2) old unit has other parts like the cage and maybe a capacitor etc

Some can be oiled; others supposed to be permanently lubed.

rbh123456789 01-05-2012 12:37 PM

2 Attachment(s)
Hey guys - just wanted to update this thread in case anyone else decides to do this type of install.
The installation was VERY easy. If you have the technical ability to change your cars spark-plugs; you can do this too. Once the shipment arrived i was pleased to find the following materials in the box:

1) motor and casing (since i bought the entire assembly)
2) 4 long threaded screws (to replace the current ones)
3) new power wire connector (to replace the current one)
4) rubber fitting with 2 clamps (which connects the inducer exhaust port to pipe of the flute)
5) o-ring style **adhesive** gasket (interfaces the draft housing to the back black plate)
6) instructional guide

I bought my assembly from Shorts HVAC, online. If you have questions about what is included in your package, just call them and ask. But i think most of the contents are pretty standard across the board.
http://shortyshvac.com/index.php?mai...oducts_id=1962

I advise you to read the directions a few times before installing; then follow the instructions step by step.
I believe the only tool i used was a flat head screw driver - but no specialty tools are required.

Here is a couple items that came up during the install that the directions didn't actually make mention of:

1) the gasket was a sticker-type. i guess this would be pretty obvious to some, but you do indeed need to peel the 'wax-paper' off before mounting the gasket
2) make sure the spout coming off of the new rubber fitting is angled downwards, probably a 35 or 45 degrees angle. This enables any water to drip down the spout off the fitting, down the rubber hose and into your drain
3) CLEAN off the remains of the old gasket from the back plate before putting on the new one. You want the new gasket to have a good seal. Use some type of solution to remove the left-over glue from the previous gasket.

I suggest that if you don't already have any, buy a couple of AC wall-outlet CO detectors, which in my case cost about $80 including tax.
Plug one in at the top of your basement stairs, and another one in an upstairs bedroom; close to a hvac vent. This way, if you have a leak, you will be nearly guaranteed that the alarm will sound.
Even if you have the ceiling mounted CO detector, buy 2 (or at least 1) wall-mounted detectors anyways. CO fills up a room the same way that a liquid would; so its possible that by the time the ceiling CO detector senses the CO - it might already be too late! (especially if you are sleeping).

I have uploaded a picture of the old inducer before i removed it, and after. I also labeled the parts that came with the new package.


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