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Old 01-05-2010, 12:25 PM   #31
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DIY floor heating


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Old 01-05-2010, 12:26 PM   #32
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Old 01-05-2010, 03:49 PM   #33
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Originally Posted by beenthere View Post
1/2" pex.
Pex has its own fittings.

Make a drawing of your planned set up. Then its easier to answer questions.
Don't put the system on a timer.
Here's a rough diagram of what I'm thinking. I might be missing something.

There is probably more then one way to do this maybe a better one then this.

Also any specific reason I cannot put it on a timer? I would rely on the hot water heater's thermostat to keep the water at a certain temp, which I'd have to experiment with to see what is best temp to use. The timer would be so it only runs at certain intervals instead of all the time. I would run it a couple hours before my lunch and a couple hours before my supper, then have a way to override if I want to make it run outside of normal times.
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Old 01-05-2010, 04:16 PM   #34
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Radiant is a slow heat.
Specially if its a staple up system.

Zones/loops should have flow rate set for the BTU the area needs.

Better if circ is on supply side.
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Old 01-05-2010, 08:03 PM   #35
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How long about do you think a typical system takes to be noticeable on the floor? If it's a couple hours I rather be able to just time it a few hours ahead, then have it run 24/7 including when I'm not home, or in bed. Though I'd have to experiment, if the HW heater is not running that often then I could maybe set it low and not use that much power. I'm not looking for a heat power house, more or less a warm feeling on the tiles much like those electric pads that are added in the tile thinset.

As for putting the pump on the supply side will that be an issue if the pipe coming out of the tank is higher then the pump? Or will it be able to suck the water out? In a perfect situation there should be no air so guess this wont matter as it will just push the water that's ahead through the system, which will then push water out of the tank.

Should I have valves at the end of each loop as well? That way when filling I can do one loop at a time. I'm wondering if my current method of filling would make it possible for air to get trapped in the loops while other loops fill.

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Old 01-05-2010, 08:07 PM   #36
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My system under tile floor may take 30 min to 1 hour to go from 65 to 70
You will be going thru the subfloor/floor, so possibly longer depending upon thickness
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Old 01-05-2010, 08:52 PM   #37
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My system under tile floor may take 30 min to 1 hour to go from 65 to 70
You will be going thru the subfloor/floor, so possibly longer depending upon thickness
Wow that's not too bad then. I have enough to go through so it may take me longer. Starting from bottom: 1x6 planks (spaced by about 1mm), 1/2 plywood if I recall, old linoleum tile glue/paper (gave up trying to remove it LOL), small plywood subfloor (2-3mm maybe?), ceramic tiles. So yeah that's a lot of layers to go through.

I will probably add rigid foam after the pipes are installed where I can so the heat will be trapped and naturally will go up.
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Old 01-05-2010, 10:38 PM   #38
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Circs don't suck water, nor do they pump water(they aren't pumps). They just create a pressure difference. So they location in the system doesn't effect their operation.

It can however effect air problems. And being in the supply, helps minimize air problems.

I'd say 2 hours or so, to warm the floor. Another hour to 1 hour to begin to notice an increase in room temp.
Plus the time it takes to get the water temp up, from having the water heater turned off, in the first place. So could be 3 hours. Or a little more.
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Old 01-05-2010, 11:22 PM   #39
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I can't seem to find circulators on any of stores here, would they still be called pumps?

Would something like this work?

http://www.homedepot.ca/webapp/wcs/s...k=P_PartNumber

Any disadvantage to having too fast of a water flow?
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Old 01-06-2010, 05:23 AM   #40
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No, that wouldn't work.

These are circs.

Too much water flow is a noisy system. And can decrease heat transfer.
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Old 01-06-2010, 09:13 AM   #41
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Hey Red Squirrel-
You're on the right track but there's a little more to what's called a "dry" installation of this system and it's the least efficient way of installing a radiant heat floor. Have been researching for quite some time and there's lots to read if you Google "Radiant Heat". In general, radiant heat is very efficient, super snuggly, and very healthy. Have a blast with it!!

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