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jamesf78 10-04-2012 09:48 AM

Condensation Solutions?
 
Hiya,

Long time reader, first time poster (I have never known why people say that!)

I have really bad condensation in my home, we currently have warm air heating which I'm sure doesn't help.

I'm thinking about getting new windows but didn't want to spend all that money if it wasn't going to do any good.

I was wondering what people thought I should look at?

Thanks in advance

joecaption 10-04-2012 11:03 AM

Condinsation inside the has nothing to do with the windows. It's simply to much humity inside the home.
Roof venting, soffit vents, having propper sized bathroom fans and using them everytime someone takes a shower and leaving them on for a while after the shower, vent over the stove that blows outside not just recirulates, a vaper barrier on the ground under the house if there's a crawl space.

techpappy 10-04-2012 12:07 PM

Install a dehumidifier.

We need more info re house
Ventilation..as previously stated..exhaust fans
location?
structure? age, materials, method, vapor barrier, doors, windows, weather stripping...insulation ceiling/walls
near water?
ground, rock, sand, clay...swamp..river
type of heating/air conditioning...are they operating OK

Occupancy..how many people..doors/windows left open?..number of showers...laundry dryer..vented outside

Fairview 10-04-2012 12:56 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jamesf78 (Post 1023594)
Hiya,

Long time reader, first time poster (I have never known why people say that!)

I have really bad condensation in my home, we currently have warm air heating which I'm sure doesn't help.

I'm thinking about getting new windows but didn't want to spend all that money if it wasn't going to do any good.

I was wondering what people thought I should look at?

Thanks in advance

The moisture level of your indoor air could average within normal range and your windows only condense moisture when cooking etc. Thermal windows or anything that tends to warm the glass panes that are in contact with the indoor air will certainly help that.

A few more details may help diagnose and make recommendations but we certainly don't need to know where you live. We only need ambient air and dew point temps.

techpappy 10-04-2012 01:47 PM

by location I meant Country...North, South East, or West..southwest, northeast etc. to give an idea of climate..I am near Lake Ontario ..very humid at times...go 2 hrs away from lake and RH drops significanly..and I remember checking a furnace one time where there was actually a creek running through the basement...That sort of info could be very helpful

thanks

johnnystripes 10-04-2012 07:01 PM

Does a dehumidifier effect the climate of a room at all? I was thinking about installing one to keep a basement room at a more even temperature but it might just be the humidity that makes it feel hotter.. not sure.

techpappy 10-04-2012 07:29 PM

yes, humidity makes a room feel hotter...dehumidifier lowers humidity and makes room feel cooler and drier...

jamesf78 10-05-2012 02:56 AM

I live in the UK in the south. It is a flat but there are only two in the block (so in effect it's like a semi detached house) there are 2 of us and a baby and a dog. 2 bedrooms the shower room has a fan and the kitchen has a fan too.

We have a vent in the babies bedroom and the heater in there is on constantly.

Is that any help?

Fairview 10-05-2012 05:38 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by jamesf78 (Post 1024120)
I live in the UK in the south. It is a flat but there are only two in the block (so in effect it's like a semi detached house) there are 2 of us and a baby and a dog. 2 bedrooms the shower room has a fan and the kitchen has a fan too.

We have a vent in the babies bedroom and the heater in there is on constantly.

Is that any help?

That information may help some folks, and congratulations on your family, but I'm sorry it doesn't help determine the severity of your condensation problem.

Until the room temperature and dew point temperature is determined so a calculation can be done we won't know if it " just feels " or " really is " too moist and many corrective measures may be of little consequence. i.e. knowing if there is only condensation on the window panes or is water droplets about to form on the ceilings and drip off.

Room temperature is easy if you have a thermometer. Determining dew point temperature is a little more difficult but not much. A glass of water cooled until condensation forms will tell that story.

A sling psychrometer can be used to directly measure relative humidity but I feel the dew point method is a better measure in this instance. This was originally known as the silver cup method but that was probably before glass was invented.

techpappy 10-05-2012 08:41 AM

Amount of air entering home can be greatly influenced by any fireplaces that may be out of use but where the flue damper is open or missing...also greatly affects ability to heat space...couls also be from excess moisture getting into walls from leaking roof, window/door frames etc., All of UK known for high humidity..lots of rain..except when the wife and I visited abiut 5 yrs ago..warm and sunny for the whole two weeks we were there in Nottingham, Skegness and Liverpool..(Great Beatles TAXI TOUR!!)..but, I digress. Can you elaborate on these conditions? We stayed in many houses of my wifes relatives.None had those problems..She was born in Nottingham Sherwood Forest..I always said I married Maid Marion!!:laughing: So, let's see if we can help if you can provide more info..BTW..how is the home heated..Hot Water/Steam Rads..are any of those leaking?

classicair 10-05-2012 05:33 PM

t's essential that the condensate tray work properly or the excess water will drip onto the heat exchanger — the most critical component of the furnace — and can rust it prematurely, necessitating that you replace the furnace. Although you can't see the condensate tray, you sometimes can see signs that it's malfunctioning. Water stains on the top of the furnace indicate that the condensate tray is cracked or tilted. It can also mean that pan is overflowing because the plug to the drain line is clogged. Or the condensate line could be leaking, missing, broken, or plugged.
Condensate pumps are prone to failure, so if you have one, check it monthly. If your pump does break, it's relatively inexpensive and easy to replace. Also check drain lines, if you can access them, to make sure they're attached to their pan, are flowing freely and have no leaks.
If your central air unit is in need of maintenance or repair, it's best to hire a qualified contractor

jamesf78 10-08-2012 04:23 AM

Thanks for that guys. I will try and get a dew temp. In regard to the heating I have a warm air heater in the middle of the property.

It is basically old and pumps hot air through a vent in the front room and I guess it is supposed to circulate around the home but the bedrooms are cold (except for the babies) The condensation doesn't form on the ceilings but is so bad on the windows in the morning that I have to use a squeegee to get the excess moisture off the window and then dry the bottom of the window with a dishcloth

techpappy 10-08-2012 06:39 AM

Do you have access to your forced air heater ..is it a gas fired unit..is it shared with the other flat ..if so, could there be excess moisture from other flat ..are there any return air ducts which transfer room air back to the unit...can you post pictures of the unit..what are the room temps and humidity/outdoor temps and humidity..all/any of this info could be helpful

sktn77a 10-08-2012 05:02 PM

Do you have single pane or thermal pane windows? (If the former, you're going to have condensation problems no mater what) What kind of heat generation do you have? Electric? Gas? If gas, how is is vented? Gas heat combustion produces water and carbon dioxide, both of which need to be vented out of the house (for different reasons). The South of England doesn't get that cold (growing up in Newcastle-on-Tyne, I'm familiar with the cold, damp climate). Do you have a separate heater in the baby's room (if so, what is it - electric, paraffin?) or is it part of the central heating system? How old is the flat? How old is the heating system (original?).

Answer these basic question first.


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