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Old 09-11-2015, 09:37 PM   #1
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Condensate drain


My daughters A/C condensate drain hose is plugged again. She has an interior townhouse. Its almost 30 Yrs old. The drain hose goes thru interior walls about 40 ft to the front of her house. It plugged about 2 years ago but I was able to blow it out enough to get it going again. At that time I also bought a new pump. I think even if I can get it going again, its just going to plug up again later. I have it temporally draining now across her rec room floor to a nearby toilet. I have located a drain pipe in the furnace room wall from an upstairs bath sink drain. Its a very difficult location to get to but I think I can do it. I plan on drilling a hole into the PVC pipe, screw in a brass barbed nipple and attach a 1/2 in plastic hose to it. I was planning on using a loop in the hose for a trap but with so many obstacles in the way, by the time the hose gets to the pipe, its too low to allow room for a loop(without being too tight and may kink). Would a sag in the hose enough to hold water be sufficient for a trap? A 1&1/2 inch sag should allow the 1/2 inch hose to fill with no air passable. Any downside to this solution? I'm all out of ideas otherwise.
I'm hoping to be able to get rid of the pump also.

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Old 09-12-2015, 10:36 AM   #2
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Condensate drains cannot be direct connected into the plumbing system. Direct connected means tied into the drain without an air gap. I would suggest getting some algaecide blowing open the drain then treating it. Bleach is an algaecide.

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Old 09-13-2015, 11:24 PM   #3
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Use a shop vac and suck the line clear
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Old 09-14-2015, 02:21 AM   #4
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A couple of things: 1) In my area it would be illegal to run the condensate drain from an A/C unit into a municipal sanitary sewer line. Strangely enough it is legal to allow this condensate drain to run out onto the ground--go figure. 2) The main reason that condensate drain lines for A/C units become clogged is algae. Some would tell you that it is mold/mildew because it is normally a slimy green color, but it is algae. I have some education in this area and that is what they taught us. IF the drain pan for this A/C unit can be easily reached it is a good idea to put some Clorox into the drain pan quite often. We're not talking about a lot of Clorox, maybe a tablespoon about once a month. When people say they have "cleaned out the line" by blowing air through it or using a water hose to blow out the mess--the line is not really cleaned out. All you have done is to create just enough of a passage in this line to drain what water appears to be in the drain pan and line. Using the Clorox will kill the algae and it will wash on out even with the small amount of water during normal use. Almost all of these type A/C systems I have worked on had a type of "P" trap just after the drain pan, but maybe yours doesn't.
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Old 09-14-2015, 04:00 AM   #5
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CLR is wonderful stuff also.

Calcium and lime build can be removed using this without scrubbing.
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Old 09-14-2015, 09:54 PM   #6
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Original poster here.
I guess I gave too much information. What I really wanted was an answer to this question.
Would a sag in the hose enough to hold water be sufficient for a trap? A 1&1/2 inch sag should allow the 1/2 inch hose to fill with no air passable.
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Old 09-15-2015, 04:18 AM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by partner View Post
Original poster here.
I guess I gave too much information. What I really wanted was an answer to this question.
Would a sag in the hose enough to hold water be sufficient for a trap? A 1&1/2 inch sag should allow the 1/2 inch hose to fill with no air passable.
Of course it will hold enough water.

Should you do this? No.

The furnace will also need to produce enough condensation so the line never dries out.
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Old 09-15-2015, 08:28 AM   #8
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Where I am we don't bother with traps. The amount of air leakage is negligible compared to them plugging with bacteria and causing overflow problems and lots of damage.

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