Go Back   DIY Chatroom Home Improvement Forum > Home Improvement > HVAC

CLICK HERE AND JOIN OUR COMMUNITY TODAY...IT'S FREE!

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
Old 01-13-2010, 10:49 AM   #1
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: michigan
Posts: 11
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Cold Air return question


My furnace is located in the basement, I have a total of 6 ceiling heat runs in the basement that were there when I bought the house. It still seems a little chilly in the basement.

I was about to cut a 3" hole in the cold air return duct about 6 inches or so off the basement floor as my boss suggested that dabbles in heating and cooling,he claims I need to move the air around in the basement so it won't be chilly down there .

I figured I would wait on cutting the hole and ask for advice on this, do you agree with his suggestion or have another suggestion?.

Jay0018 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2010, 01:48 PM   #2
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 25,645
Rewards Points: 2,970
Default

Cold Air return question


Gonna need more then a 3" hole if you have 6 supplies.

Will still be cooler in the basement. Since the cool air from teh first floor will always fall to the basement. And the warmest air in teh basement will always rise to the first floor.

beenthere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2010, 03:44 PM   #3
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 2,362
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

Cold Air return question


Don't cut holes in the return drop if you furnace or water heater are gas. It will cause the flues for those appliance to downdraft and put CO in your house.
Marty S. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2010, 04:13 PM   #4
Member
 
newtech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 251
Rewards Points: 162
Default

Cold Air return question


Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty S. View Post
Don't cut holes in the return drop if you furnace or water heater are gas. It will cause the flues for those appliance to downdraft and put CO in your house.
Thats odd... My basement has 3 cold air returns and I'm still alive. Furnace and hot water tank are gas fired...
newtech is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2010, 05:06 PM   #5
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 2,362
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

Cold Air return question


Quote:
Originally Posted by newtech View Post
Thats odd... My basement has 3 cold air returns and I'm still alive. Furnace and hot water tank are gas fired...
Never said you couldn't have returns in the basement. They can't be within 10' of a combustion appliance and that is what the poster was planning to do. Ducting them into another room is perfectly fine and adds quite a bit of comfort to a cold basement.
Marty S. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2010, 05:38 PM   #6
Member
 
newtech's Avatar
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Posts: 251
Rewards Points: 162
Default

Cold Air return question


Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty S. View Post
They can't be within 10' of a combustion appliance and that is what the poster was planning to do. .

Did he edit his original post??? I didn't see where he was going to intall the return in the post I read. Correct me if I'm wrong. But isn't the 10' rule for fresh air, not return air???

Last edited by newtech; 01-13-2010 at 05:52 PM.
newtech is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2010, 05:59 PM   #7
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 2,362
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

Cold Air return question


Nope, no edit. Can't think of any place other then the return drop,right next to the furnace, where there's going to be return duct to cut a hole in 6" off the floor though.
Marty S. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2010, 06:28 PM   #8
Old Newbie
 
Join Date: Aug 2009
Location: Ottawa Valley, Eastern Ontario, Canada
Posts: 70
Rewards Points: 75
Default

Cold Air return question


Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty S. View Post
Nope, no edit. Can't think of any place other then the return drop,right next to the furnace, where there's going to be return duct to cut a hole in 6" off the floor though.
tinmanrob is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2010, 07:57 PM   #9
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: michigan
Posts: 11
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Cold Air return question


Quote:
Originally Posted by Marty S. View Post
Nope, no edit. Can't think of any place other then the return drop,right next to the furnace, where there's going to be return duct to cut a hole in 6" off the floor though.

Yes this is where I was going to cut the hole as suggested,obviously you don't want to make it to big though otherwise it seems like you would lose your draw from upstairs.

Yes the furnace is gas powered and my high effeincy water tank is gas powered in a seperate room about 20 ft away from furnace. There is a drop cieling in basement also if that helps any.

So are you guys saying that I can't cut a hole in my cold air return drop down right next to the furnace or I can?.

I have to get back to work home for lunch break but will read replies when I get home at 2:00a.m.

Thanks for feedback

My furnace is also high efficency so if my thinking is correct I shouldnt have to worry about co build up because my fresh air is being drawn from outside...is my thinking correct or no? Or does the cold air return still have to be ducted 10 feet away from the furance?

Last edited by Jay0018; 01-13-2010 at 08:09 PM.
Jay0018 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2010, 08:08 PM   #10
Member
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Nebraska
Posts: 2,362
Rewards Points: 1,000
Default

Cold Air return question


If your furnace has PVC intake AND exhaust vents then you can cut into the drop since the water heater is in another room. If it has a metal flue you can not.
Marty S. is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-13-2010, 08:10 PM   #11
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 25,645
Rewards Points: 2,970
Default

Cold Air return question


10' from furnace.

A 3" hole won't make enough of a difference for you to notice it improve your heat.
beenthere is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2010, 03:13 AM   #12
Newbie
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: michigan
Posts: 11
Rewards Points: 10
Default

Cold Air return question


Yes intake and exhaust are both PVC no metal, yes agree beenthere but a 3inch hole is just a starting point as we say in the machine shop you can always take more metal off it's harder to put it back on, specially when you are doing aerospace work.

Guess I could go bigger with the hole from the get go maybe 3"w x 6"L to start with if worse comes to worse can just sheet metal some of the hole back up if I lose too much draw from upstairs.

Thanks to all for your help.
Jay0018 is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2010, 04:14 AM   #13
Member
 
hvaclover's Avatar
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: Suburbs of Detroit Mi
Posts: 3,704
Rewards Points: 2,000
Default

Cold Air return question


Quote:
Originally Posted by Jay0018 View Post
Yes intake and exhaust are both PVC no metal, yes agree beenthere but a 3inch hole is just a starting point as we say in the machine shop you can always take more metal off it's harder to put it back on, specially when you are doing aerospace work.

Guess I could go bigger with the hole from the get go maybe 3"w x 6"L to start with if worse comes to worse can just sheet metal some of the hole back up if I lose too much draw from upstairs.

Thanks to all for your help.
Start with a standard size register hole, say 10x4 with a built in damper.

You'll know the first day if any improvement has occurred. I like your thinking:You can always remove more if you go conservative on cutting RA registers.

I like bigger blowers for the same reasons. If you have too much air flow you can change to a lower speed.
__________________
Just slow, not stupid.
hvaclover is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 01-14-2010, 04:35 AM   #14
An old Tradesmen
 
Join Date: Oct 2008
Location: PA
Posts: 25,645
Rewards Points: 2,970
Default

Cold Air return question


In residential new construction. When the house is being built. And they need heat. But don't want to draw drywall dust into the furnace.
What is often done. Is the return drop is not connected. It still draws the same amount of air for the first and second floor. Just lets the drywall dust have time to settle i n the basement instead of being directly drawn into the furnace.

So, it you cut a 20X20 hole in the return. It will still draw the same amount of air from the first floor. Unless your duct is undersized. In which case. You just helped your system anyway.

The larger the return opening you make. the easier you make it to put air into your basement.

Don't know about aerospace.

But, in HVAC, we measure twice, cut once.

beenthere is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply


Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Running wire through a cold air return? beezlebub03 Electrical 37 02-28-2010 10:57 AM
Need advice on odd cold air return size angrydot HVAC 1 12-12-2009 01:23 PM
Weak Cold Air Return sbhcom HVAC 1 12-11-2009 01:14 PM
Cold air return grill at furnace intake Zeke2112 HVAC 6 11-20-2009 06:41 AM
Cold air return questions ekulrenlig HVAC 19 10-09-2009 01:44 PM




Top of Page | View New Posts

Copyright © 2003-2014 Escalate Media. All Rights Reserved.