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-   -   chimney flue liner question (http://www.diychatroom.com/f17/chimney-flue-liner-question-132679/)

andrewjs18 02-05-2012 04:38 PM

chimney flue liner question
 
Hi all,

I recently had my chimney inspected to ensure it was safe for use with my fireplace. My chimney has two flues, one for the fireplace and one for the boiler/water heater. Over the years, the heat source in my house was coal, then changed to oil, and now it's gas. Apparently, according to the guy that inspected my chimney, that can wreak havoc on the liners. the fireplace liner isn't in bad shape, some very minor flaking but all in all, it's good to go. my liner for the boiler and water heater, however, is in need of repair ASAP - entire sections of the old liner are missing, there was chunks of terracotta in the cleanout, etc..

Anyhow, the question I have is whether or not I'll have issues going forward if I replace my old boiler (140,000 BTUs) with a newer and more efficient boiler. According to the guy that did the inspection, 140,000 BTUs seems a bit much for a house of my size (approximately 1,320 SqFt). I believe he said my current liner is a 6in, would I have issues if when I bought a new boiler, it only needed a 4 or 5in liner?

REP 02-05-2012 05:00 PM

At 140,00 btu s I would guess that is twice what it has to be.
There is no benifit from repairing the bad flue.You could have a flue liner of flexible metal installed or if it were my house I would run "B" vent in the old chimney.Neither of these are new and both have been around for decades.
When you get your new 50,000-70,000 boiler get an indirect water heater so that nothing else has to be vented up the chimney.

andrewjs18 02-05-2012 05:33 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by REP (Post 845338)
At 140,00 btu s I would guess that is twice what it has to be.
There is no benifit from repairing the bad flue.You could have a flue liner of flexible metal installed or if it were my house I would run "B" vent in the old chimney.Neither of these are new and both have been around for decades.
When you get your new 50,000-70,000 boiler get an indirect water heater so that nothing else has to be vented up the chimney.

the chimney guy quoted $1600 for a stainless steel liner with a lifetime warranty that was transferable. I just don't want to put out that money and then have issues down the road if I decide to upgrade the old boiler.

hvac5646 02-05-2012 06:02 PM

or u could save more than a grand and use a standard chimney liner
http://s.ecrater.com/stores/191377/4...f4_191377f.jpg

Plumber101 02-05-2012 06:08 PM

You can use an aluminum flue liner or use single wall metal. The Stainless steel live us used more often for wood stoves and pellet stove. Where it is natural gas the flue temp won't reach the temp needed for stainless steel

Ebay has flue liners for a pretty good price. With the lowering of the BTU's and encased in a chimey you should be able to reduce to 4".

andrewjs18 02-05-2012 11:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Plumber101 (Post 845393)
You can use an aluminum flue liner or use single wall metal. The Stainless steel live us used more often for wood stoves and pellet stove. Where it is natural gas the flue temp won't reach the temp needed for stainless steel

Ebay has flue liners for a pretty good price. With the lowering of the BTU's and encased in a chimey you should be able to reduce to 4".

the downfall to using an aluminum liner, at least in my specific instance, is that the chimney guy only warranties it while I'm living here, it's not transferable. at least with a SS liner, the warranty will transfer if I were to sell the house, which could be used as a selling point.

I don't plan on upgrading the heater at the same time as getting the new liner installed. this is why I was curious if this would be an issue later down the road if I were to upgrade the heater.

Ironlight 02-05-2012 11:34 PM

I have never heard of someone deciding to buy a house because it had a stainless steel liner in the chimney. In fact, the inspector likely won't even note what the furnace liner is made from, only that the terra cotta flue was "recently relined." Don't shell out for something on the theory that it's going to help you sell your house down the road. Renovated kitchens and bathrooms sell houses and recoup some of their cost, chimney liners don't.

andrewjs18 02-06-2012 12:17 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Ironlight (Post 845668)
I have never heard of someone deciding to buy a house because it had a stainless steel liner in the chimney. In fact, the inspector likely won't even note what the furnace liner is made from, only that the terra cotta flue was "recently relined." Don't shell out for something on the theory that it's going to help you sell your house down the road. Renovated kitchens and bathrooms sell houses and recoup some of their cost, chimney liners don't.

that's a good point too. thanks for giving me a proverbial slap, it was needed!


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