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Old 01-24-2013, 03:42 PM   #16
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Bleeding radiators and adding water


I'm not a boiler guy--the others answering you are--so I'll stay in the background and watch--

I have two pumps on my system---they have a life of about 12 to 14 years before the impellers are worn away---

I also have a pressure/feed valve on mine---so I can't add much---good luck----you are in good hands already.

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Old 01-24-2013, 04:47 PM   #17
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Bleeding radiators and adding water


The blue handled valve near the boiler is your manual water feed valve. You'll also need to open the blue handle valve up at the ceiling.
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Old 01-24-2013, 06:38 PM   #18
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Bleeding radiators and adding water


OK.. These old eyes can't see a pressure reducing valve on your boiler system. That's a first for me inside city limits. That means you have to manually replace the water you loose in bleeding the rad's. You will have to carefully watch your pressure guage while filling to not over pressurize your system.
As others have pointed out..Both blue valves will need to be cracked open to do this.
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Old 01-24-2013, 11:37 PM   #19
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Bleeding radiators and adding water


Okay, so I am going to do this:

1. Put thermostat on 55, so the system is off.

2. Insert key in radiator, turn slightly, let air escape until water starts to come out. Turn key back.

3. Do this to all radiators on ground floor.

4. Go downstairs to boiler and look at gauge.

5. If it is not at 12 - 15 lbs or 25 - 30 feet, I will open both blue valves.

6. Keep eyes on gauge and close valves when they reach the numbers above.

I have a photo of the gauge as it is now (included in first group posted). My plan is to fill it until it looks the same.

Is this plan right?

Heat has been on all day and it has only gone from 58 to 63.5 degrees on the main floor (it's 66.7 upstairs) - I hope this works. Fingers crossed. I will wait and do tomorrow after hearing back from this forum. Thanks!!!
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Old 01-24-2013, 11:42 PM   #20
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Bleeding radiators and adding water


How often is the boiler serviced,have you been keeping system flushed out?
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Old 01-25-2013, 12:02 AM   #21
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How often is the boiler serviced,have you been keeping system flushed out?
Haven't done anything to the boiler since it was put in in 2006. Never heard anything about keeping it flushed out - never flushed the one prior. Before this boiler I had an old octopus, cast iron boiler originally coal, converted to gas. House was built in 1904. Hated to see it go, but the cast iron had disintegrated. But then I digress......
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Old 01-25-2013, 04:13 AM   #22
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Bleeding radiators and adding water


No need to flush out a closed system.
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Old 01-25-2013, 04:19 AM   #23
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Bleeding radiators and adding water


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Haven't done anything to the boiler since it was put in in 2006.
Wow i have my guy come in every year clean it good check expansion tank. So on and so fourth. I will tell you how my guy did this. First he shut the boiler off. He then went around with skate key and bleed everything. My boiler water line is always open. (freshwater coming in line)
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Old 01-25-2013, 08:10 AM   #24
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Bleeding radiators and adding water


This is my plan. BeenThere and How, you have been following this all along - should I do as outlined below. Of course, help from any interested parties is always appreciated.



Quote:
Originally Posted by hubbard View Post
Okay, so I am going to do this:

1. Put thermostat on 55, so the system is off.

2. Insert key in radiator, turn slightly, let air escape until water starts to come out. Turn key back.

3. Do this to all radiators on ground floor.

4. Go downstairs to boiler and look at gauge.

5. If it is not at 12 - 15 lbs or 25 - 30 feet, I will open both blue valves.

6. Keep eyes on gauge and close valves when they reach the numbers above.

I have a photo of the gauge as it is now (included in first group posted). My plan is to fill it until it looks the same.

Is this plan right?

Heat has been on all day and it has only gone from 58 to 63.5 degrees on the main floor (it's 66.7 upstairs) - I hope this works. Fingers crossed. I will wait and do tomorrow after hearing back from this forum. Thanks!!!
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Old 01-25-2013, 10:00 AM   #25
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Bleeding radiators and adding water


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No need to flush out a closed system.
Ive had many systems over the years that Ive serviced that were filled with water that resembled mud from years of not being serviced,especially with steel lines running in the system.
Ive found boilers run much more efficiently pumping clean water rather than rust/mud,much easier on the pumps also
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Old 01-25-2013, 11:59 AM   #26
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Bleeding radiators and adding water


Quote:
Originally Posted by hubbard View Post
Okay, so I am going to do this:

1. Put thermostat on 55, so the system is off.

2. Insert key in radiator, turn slightly, let air escape until water starts to come out. Turn key back.

3. Do this to all radiators on ground floor.

4. Go downstairs to boiler and look at gauge.

5. If it is not at 12 - 15 lbs or 25 - 30 feet, I will open both blue valves.

6. Keep eyes on gauge and close valves when they reach the numbers above.

I have a photo of the gauge as it is now (included in first group posted). My plan is to fill it until it looks the same.

Is this plan right?

Heat has been on all day and it has only gone from 58 to 63.5 degrees on the main floor (it's 66.7 upstairs) - I hope this works. Fingers crossed. I will wait and do tomorrow after hearing back from this forum. Thanks!!!
Ayuh,.... That's a Good start to find the problem, 'n bleed the system,...

Btw,... Havin' a Pro service, check, 'n clean yer boiler, Annually is Always a Great Idea....
Much more important, with an Oil boiler, but preventative Maintenance should be done on ALL systems...
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Old 01-25-2013, 06:34 PM   #27
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Bleeding radiators and adding water


Quote:
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This is my plan. BeenThere and How, you have been following this all along - should I do as outlined below. Of course, help from any interested parties is always appreciated.
Ya, thats a good outline.
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Old 01-25-2013, 06:37 PM   #28
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Bleeding radiators and adding water


Quote:
Originally Posted by plummen View Post
Ive had many systems over the years that Ive serviced that were filled with water that resembled mud from years of not being serviced,especially with steel lines running in the system.
Ive found boilers run much more efficiently pumping clean water rather than rust/mud,much easier on the pumps also
Those systems probably had fresh water added on a regular basis. Its the oxygen that eats a way at the steel.
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Old 01-25-2013, 07:14 PM   #29
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Bleeding radiators and adding water


The boiler set ups that take in new water on a regular basis from leaking auto bleeds or P&T's, or from regular flushings can often rival the dreaded poly B systems for rapid boiler oxygen based deterioration.
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Old 01-25-2013, 08:36 PM   #30
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Those systems probably had fresh water added on a regular basis. Its the oxygen that eats a way at the steel.
Most of the time they hadnt been serviced in years and no rust inhibitor in water.
Once I got the steam boiler in my big building under control by completely fushing the system several times and getting the chemicals/rust inhibitor in the system my utilitie bills for heating went from $2000.00 plus on really bad months down to closer to $1200.00 on really bad months to heat with that old 93hp kewanee.
I would flush some trash out of system in the morning and some at night,then on saturday mornings Id flush maybe 50 gallons out of bottem of boiler.
All the late night calls I was getting about no heat stopped after I started checking the system daily,the serious cuts in the gas bill made it worth the little extra time everyday to stop by and check things out.

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